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Old 11-07-2008, 08:28 AM   #1
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I need a code book - 680.43


I have been searching online, and can't find a copy of 680.43, only references to it, that are not answering my question.

I understand for a outdoor hot tub / spa that you must use 4 insulated conductors. However my understanding is that there are some different rules, that are less strict for indoor tubs. I was referred to 680.43 (appreciate the reference), but as I mentioned, am unable to find the exact code and understand what it means.

Could anyone tell me what that part of the code says or possible summarize the differences for a indoor tub installation over a out door one?

Thanks very much
Jamie

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Old 11-07-2008, 08:36 AM   #2
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I need a code book - 680.43


The NEC is listed in http://www.nfpa.org/aboutthecodes/li...ookie%5Ftest=1 You will have to register to look at the online version.

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Old 11-07-2008, 09:50 AM   #3
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I need a code book - 680.43


680.43 Indoor Installations
A spa or hot tub installed indoors shall comply with the provisions of Parts I and II of this
article except as modified by this section and shall be connected by the wiring methods of
Chapter 3.
Exception: Listed spa and hot tub packaged units rated 20 amperes or less shall be
permitted to be cord-and-plug connected to facilitate the removal or disconnection of the
unit for maintenance and repair.
(A) Receptacles
At least one 125-volt, 15- or 20-ampere receptacle on a general-purpose
branch circuit shall be located not less than 1.5 m (5 ft) from, and not exceeding 3.0 m
(10 ft) from, the inside wall of the spa or hot tub.

(1) Location
Receptacles shall be located at least 1.5 m (5 ft) measured horizontally from
the inside walls of the spa or hot tub.

(2) Protection, General
Receptacles rated 125 volts and 30 amperes or less and located
within 3.0 m (10 ft) of the inside walls of a spa or hot tub shall be protected by a groundfault
circuit interrupter.

(3) Protection, Spa or Hot Tub Supply Receptacle
Receptacles that provide power for
a spa or hot tub shall be ground-fault circuit-interrupter protected.

(4) Measurements
In determining the dimensions in this section addressing receptacle
spacings, the distance to be measured shall be the shortest path the supply cord of an
appliance connected to the receptacle would follow without piercing a floor, wall, ceiling,
doorway with hinged or sliding door, window opening, or other effective permanent
barrier.

(B) Installation of Luminaires (Lighting Fixtures), Lighting Outlets, and Ceiling-
Suspended (Paddle) Fans
(1) Elevation
Luminaires (lighting fixtures), except as covered in 680.43(B)(2), lighting
outlets, and ceiling-suspended (paddle) fans located over the spa or hot tub or within 1.5
m (5 ft) from the inside walls of the spa or hot tub shall comply with the clearances
specified in (B)(1)(a), (B)(1)(b), and (B)(1)(c) above the maximum water level.
(a) Without GFCI. Where no GFCI protection is provided, the mounting height shall
be not less than 3.7 m (12 ft).
(b) With GFCI. Where GFCI protection is provided, the mounting height shall be
permitted to be not less than 2.3 m (7 ft 6 in.).
(c) Below 2.3 m (7 ft 6 in.). Luminaires (lighting fixtures) meeting the requirements
of item (1) or (2) and protected by a ground-fault circuit interrupter shall be
permitted to be installed less than 2.3 m (7 ft 6 in.) over a spa or hot tub:
(1) Recessed luminaires (fixtures) with a glass or plastic lens, nonmetallic or
electrically isolated metal trim, and suitable for use in damp locations
(2) Surface-mounted luminaires (fixtures) with a glass or plastic globe, a
nonmetallic body, or a metallic body isolated from contact, and suitable for
use in damp locations

(2) Underwater Applications
Underwater luminaires (lighting fixtures) shall comply
with the provisions of 680.23 or 680.33.

(C) Wall Switches
Switches shall be located at least 1.5 m (5 ft), measured horizontally,
from the inside walls of the spa or hot tub.
Receptacles, wall switches, and electrical devices and controls not associated with a
spa or hot tub are required to be located at least 5 ft from the inside wall of the spa or
hot tub. Receptacles within 10 ft are required to be protected by a GFCI. Receptacles
supplying power to a spa or hot tub are also required to be protected by a GFCI unless
the unit is a listed package unit with integral GFCI protection.
Lighting fixtures, lighting outlets, and ceiling-suspended (paddle) fans located less
than 12 ft over a spa or hot tub and within 5 ft horizontally from the inside walls of the
spa or hot tub are required to be protected by a GFCI.

(D) Bonding
The following parts shall be bonded together:
(1) All metal fittings within or attached to the spa or hot tub structure
(2) Metal parts of electrical equipment associated with the spa or hot tub water
circulating system, including pump motors
(3) Metal conduit and metal piping that are within 1.5 m (5 ft) of the inside walls of
the spa or hot tub and that are not separated from the spa or hot tub by a
permanent barrier
(4) All metal surfaces that are within 1.5 m (5 ft) of the inside walls of the spa or hot
tub and that are not separated from the spa or hot tub area by a permanent barrier

Exception: Small conductive surfaces not likely to become energized, such as air and
water jets and drain fittings, where not connected to metallic piping, towel bars, mirror
frames, and similar nonelectrical equipment, shall not be required to be bonded.
(5) Electrical devices and controls that are not associated with the spas or hot tubs
and that are located not less than 1.5 m (5 ft) from such units; otherwise they shall
be bonded to the spa or hot tub system
Bonding and grounding requirements are similar to those in Parts I and II of Article
680, except that metal-to-metal mounting on a common frame or base is an acceptable
bonding method.
Small conductive surfaces such as air and water jets, drain fittings, and towel bars are
not required to be bonded. See 680.43(D)(4), Exception.
Listed packaged units are permitted to be cord connected.
(E) Methods of Bonding
All metal parts associated with the spa or hot tub shall be
bonded by any of the following methods:
(1) The interconnection of threaded metal piping and fittings
(2) Metal-to-metal mounting on a common frame or base
(3) The provisions of a copper bonding jumper, insulated, covered, or bare, not
smaller than 8 AWG solid.

(F) Grounding
The following equipment shall be grounded:
(1) All electric equipment located within 1.5 m (5 ft) of the inside wall of the spa or
hot tub
(2) All electric equipment associated with the circulating system of the spa or hot tub


Last edited by chris75; 11-07-2008 at 09:53 AM.
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Old 11-07-2008, 09:54 AM   #4
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I need a code book - 680.43



(G) Underwater Audio Equipment Underwater audio equipment shall comply with the
provisions of Part II of this article.

680.44 Protection
Except as otherwise provided in this section, the outlet(s) that supplies a self-contained
spa or hot tub, a packaged spa or hot tub equipment assembly, or a field-assembled spa or
hot tub shall be protected by a ground-fault circuit interrupter.
The requirements of 680.44 specify that field-assembled spas and hot tubs with heater
loads of 50 amperes or less are to be GFCI protected. Spas and hot tubs utilizing
voltages over 250 volts or 3-phase power are not required to have GFCI protection
because GFCI devices are not available in all voltage, amperage, and phasing
arrangements. Combination spa-pool or hot tub–pool arrangements are not required to
have GFCI protection if they share a common bonding grid.
(A) Listed Units
If so marked, a listed self-contained unit or listed packaged equipment
assembly that includes integral ground-fault circuit-interrupter protection for all electrical
parts within the unit or assembly (pumps, air blowers, heaters, lights, controls, sanitizer
generators, wiring, and so forth) shall be permitted without additional GFCI protection.

(B) Other Units
A field assembled spa or hot tub rated 3 phase or rated over 250 volts or
with a heater load of more than 50 amperes shall not require the supply to be protected by
a ground-fault circuit interrupter.

(C) Combination Pool and Spa or Hot Tub
A combination pool/hot tub or spa
assembly commonly bonded need not be protected by a ground-fault circuit interrupter.

FPN: See 680.2 for definitions of
self-contained spa or hot tub and for packaged spa or hot tub

equipment assembly
.
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Old 11-07-2008, 10:53 AM   #5
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I need a code book - 680.43


Hi chris;

Thanks for posting the code for me. It seems to all be common sense. All stuff I have already done with taking out outlets and switches (man was that a ton of work - took multiple attic junction boxes to extend the switch wires, and several new pulls of cable) that are too close and such, and adding GF protection for the outlets in the room.

Only thing that I didn't expect, but isn't a big deal is that if I understand it correctly, the light fixture that will be above the tub on a 9 foot celing will need to have GF protection as well. Not a big deal, I just din't think they used to ever require GF on light fixtures.

The wiring is no different for the tub it's self than it would be outside? Still 4 conductor? I don't know why I am confused on this, maybe the code changed from what it used to read, I really thought it was a 3 wire setup indoors.

Thanks again,

Jamie
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Old 11-07-2008, 10:54 AM   #6
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I need a code book - 680.43


Quote:
Originally Posted by gregzoll View Post
The NEC is listed in http://www.nfpa.org/aboutthecodes/li...ookie%5Ftest=1 You will have to register to look at the online version.
Thanks greg
jamie
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Old 11-07-2008, 11:12 AM   #7
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I need a code book - 680.43


Quote:
Originally Posted by jamiedolan View Post
The wiring is no different for the tub it's self than it would be outside? Still 4 conductor? I don't know why I am confused on this, maybe the code changed from what it used to read, I really thought it was a 3 wire setup indoors.

Thanks again,

Jamie
I still dont even know what your doing? Are you installing a tub indoors? You still need to follow parts I & II of 680. Also, what does the tub require? That will tell you if you need 3 or 4 wires. Also, the location of the GFCI protection will also tell you if you need 3 or 4 wires.

Just as a sidenote, I never recommend a spa/hot tub or a pool as a DIY project, its just not that easy as it sounds / looks.

Last edited by chris75; 11-07-2008 at 11:18 AM.
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Old 11-07-2008, 11:45 AM   #8
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I need a code book - 680.43


Quote:
Originally Posted by chris75 View Post
I still dont even know what your doing? Are you installing a tub indoors? You still need to follow parts I & II of 680. Also, what does the tub require? That will tell you if you need 3 or 4 wires. Also, the location of the GFCI protection will also tell you if you need 3 or 4 wires.

Just as a sidenote, I never recommend a spa/hot tub or a pool as a DIY project, its just not that easy as it sounds / looks.
I applogize I was not more clear. Yes, it is a indoor spa / hot tub 5 person 250 gallon unit. It is my parrents unit, my dad installed in his home years ago. They are not using it and are giving it to me. I am going to look at my dads current wiring, he has one of the hot tub GF breaker boxes installed, at 50Amp. I assume all of his wiring meets current code, but want to make sure about the extra wire.

The only thing I was really confused about is if your required to use a 4th wire with a indoor hot tub setup. It sounds that the requirment is based upon the GF location and the tub.

I plan to locate the GF unit in the same room as the tub, about 5 feet away.

I was hoping to make use of some materials I had on hand, (NM), which I have one piece of 6/2 with solid ground (non-se cable). I don't mind running solid conduit to my panel, however, I plan to change out my panel, and am afraid the the configuration could change enough that my wires would not be long enought to connect to the new panel, so thats why I was thinking of atleast running NM or flex conduit to the panel (I figured I could leave some more slack up in the rafters with NM or flex conduit, but didn't see a good way to do it with ridgid conduit.

Then for the run to the tub from the disconnect, I would use sealtight, which appears to only be readily available in 3/4 inch, so I would need to run 8 gage from the GF to the tub if I have to run 4 conductor.

Thanks again

Jamie
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Old 11-07-2008, 12:05 PM   #9
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I need a code book - 680.43


Jamie

I don't have a lot of time at the moment but I'll try to get back later this evening.... for your reference here is a link to the entire article 680 (2005 version).


http://www.mikeholt.com/files/PDF/Pooldownload.pdf
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Old 11-07-2008, 12:33 PM   #10
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I need a code book - 680.43


Dont take this the wrong way, but IMO your over your head and I know you dont want anyone to get hurt at you residence, so why not just hire a pro to do the hookup?
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Old 11-07-2008, 02:17 PM   #11
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I need a code book - 680.43


Quote:
Originally Posted by chris75 View Post
Dont take this the wrong way, but IMO your over your head and I know you dont want anyone to get hurt at you residence, so why not just hire a pro to do the hookup?
I just want to learn how to do this stuff myself. I was in over my head 8 months ago when I started our remodeling; with soldering copper valves, wiring 4 way switches, running and fishing wires in walls, installing ceramic tiles, installing vct tiles, konecto, painting, duct work, building walls, insulation, drywall, hung doors, etc. Everything I have done, I have taken the time to learn exactly what I needed to know, and have done a professional level job on every singe thing I have done.

I apologize that I end up with so many questions, it's just how I have learned everything, by asking people questions, reading books, guides, codes, etc.

I can tell you that I only do things that I am sure about, and I know are correct. My electrical connections are all twisted tight and top notch work. I fix old connections I find that are stripped to long or not looped on the end.

Then on larger things, there is an inspection to catch errors, which there have not been.

I do want to thank you guys again for all of the help, and assure you that I am obsessively cautious with everything I do (unlike my sometimes poorly spelled and poorly worded e-mails, - I am extremely articulate, but have a hard time getting my words onto paper), especially electrically work.

No offense taken, and thank you again.

Thanks again,
Jamie
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Old 11-07-2008, 03:28 PM   #12
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I need a code book - 680.43


Quote:
Originally Posted by jamiedolan View Post
I just want to learn how to do this stuff myself. I was in over my head 8 months ago when I started our remodeling; with soldering copper valves, wiring 4 way switches, running and fishing wires in walls, installing ceramic tiles, installing vct tiles, konecto, painting, duct work, building walls, insulation, drywall, hung doors, etc. Everything I have done, I have taken the time to learn exactly what I needed to know, and have done a professional level job on every singe thing I have done.

I apologize that I end up with so many questions, it's just how I have learned everything, by asking people questions, reading books, guides, codes, etc.

I can tell you that I only do things that I am sure about, and I know are correct. My electrical connections are all twisted tight and top notch work. I fix old connections I find that are stripped to long or not looped on the end.

Then on larger things, there is an inspection to catch errors, which there have not been.

I do want to thank you guys again for all of the help, and assure you that I am obsessively cautious with everything I do (unlike my sometimes poorly spelled and poorly worded e-mails, - I am extremely articulate, but have a hard time getting my words onto paper), especially electrically work.

No offense taken, and thank you again.

Thanks again,
Jamie
No disrespect was meant, I just want to make sure you know this is not a joke and lives are at hand with what your doing, this is not tiling, plumbing or woodworking, this is electricity and humans. thats all I'm pointing out.
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Old 11-07-2008, 05:51 PM   #13
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I need a code book - 680.43


The NEC is in the public domain because the courts ruled that anything that was a law can't be copyrighted. You can download any version without registering here:

http://bulk.resource.org/codes.gov/
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Old 11-07-2008, 06:27 PM   #14
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I need a code book - 680.43


Quote:
Originally Posted by Gigs View Post
The NEC is in the public domain because the courts ruled that anything that was a law can't be copyrighted. You can download any version without registering here:

http://bulk.resource.org/codes.gov/
Good find.
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Old 11-08-2008, 02:21 PM   #15
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I need a code book - 680.43


Quote:
Originally Posted by Gigs View Post
The NEC is in the public domain because the courts ruled that anything that was a law can't be copyrighted. You can download any version without registering here:

http://bulk.resource.org/codes.gov/
Thank You!!!

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