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Old 12-28-2012, 11:01 AM   #16
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I have an invention that requires 220V


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Originally Posted by imautoparts View Post
.... and when installed it looks like crown molding, ........
Not many homes have outlets of any kind near the ceiling and I doubt that very many people would want a cord hanging all the way down the wall.

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Old 12-28-2012, 12:42 PM   #17
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I have an invention that requires 220V


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Originally Posted by imautoparts View Post
It is a radiant heater that utilizes a unique new ceramic to provide directional, radiant warmth at high frequencies (infrared). My prototype units all utilize the 240V that my home has in every room - as it was built with embedded ceiling heat when new.

I designed a replacement electric radiant element using the new ceramic and when installed it looks like crown molding, but radiates sufficient heat to heat any room up to approximately 15' X 12'. And it isn't 6 - 8 watts, it is 6-8 amps on a 20A dedicated 240V line-in. This amp reading was gained by using a non-contact voltage tester.

I've not yet thoroughly researched heat output per amp and/or different metallic conductor materials at the 120V level. Since I've not studied AC since school 35 years ago any input would be great.

Any and all thoughts are welcome - thanks!
In this case efficiency isn't going to be greater with 240VAC, but the amps will be lower (and you can use smaller wire.) You will want to use 120VAC if you want any mass appeal/ease of use. Here's the numbers:

240VAC @ 8A = 1920W
1920W/120VAC = 16A

240VAC @ 7A = 1680W
1680W/120VAC = 14A

240VAC @ 6A = 1440W
1440W/120VAC = 12A

As someone else mentioned, this is likely to need a dedicated 20A circuit @ 120VAC. You will also want to verify the amperage reading using a multimeter in series.
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Old 12-28-2012, 01:01 PM   #18
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I have an invention that requires 220V


Quote:
Originally Posted by imautoparts View Post
It is a radiant heater that utilizes a unique new ceramic to provide directional, radiant warmth at high frequencies (infrared). My prototype units all utilize the 240V that my home has in every room - as it was built with embedded ceiling heat when new.

I designed a replacement electric radiant element using the new ceramic and when installed it looks like crown molding, but radiates sufficient heat to heat any room up to approximately 15' X 12'. And it isn't 6 - 8 watts, it is 6-8 amps on a 20A dedicated 240V line-in. This amp reading was gained by using a non-contact voltage tester.

I've not yet thoroughly researched heat output per amp and/or different metallic conductor materials at the 120V level. Since I've not studied AC since school 35 years ago any input would be great.

Any and all thoughts are welcome - thanks!
OK, so it's 1440-1920W, rather than 5-6W. 1920W is the maximum allowable continuous load on a 20A 120V circuit, so you could implement this in a 120V version as well. It is trivial to make a heating appliance work at a different voltage. Whatever the resistance is at 240V, you need 1/4 of that resistance to obtain the same wattage at half the voltage. Most permanent space heating is 240V to save on wire cost, though.

Make sure you include overtemperature cutouts in each unit.
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Old 12-28-2012, 01:16 PM   #19
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I have an invention that requires 220V


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Originally Posted by SuperJETT View Post
clamp-on ammeter.


Not what I think of when someone says a non-contact tester, but it fact you are correct.
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Old 12-28-2012, 01:23 PM   #20
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I have an invention that requires 220V


Same here, I think of something like this


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