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-   -   How to prep and install bx. (http://www.diychatroom.com/f18/how-prep-install-bx-35612/)

rgsgww 01-10-2009 09:34 PM

How to prep and install bx.
 
This is just a little guide I made for prepping bx.

What I have.

http://i428.photobucket.com/albums/q...Picture001.jpg


Cutting the bx.

http://i428.photobucket.com/albums/q...Picture002.jpg

Sliding the jacket off.

http://i428.photobucket.com/albums/q...Picture003.jpg

Remove ALL of the paper!

http://i428.photobucket.com/albums/q...Picture004.jpg

Pull bonding strip back, wrap around cable, insert bushing.

http://i428.photobucket.com/albums/q...Picture005.jpg

Slide connector on so that red "tab" from bushing sticks out with wires.

http://i428.photobucket.com/albums/q...Picture006.jpg


Sorry for poor font in pictures...don't blame me, blame jpeg.

chris75 01-10-2009 09:37 PM

red heads are not required just so you know.

rgsgww 01-10-2009 09:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by chris75 (Post 210660)
red heads are not required just so you know.


Thanks, I didn't think they were.

chris75 01-10-2009 09:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rgsgww (Post 210665)
Thanks, I didn't think they were.

Dont get me wrong, I usually use them, and I like you post alot. but I do like to state the facts also.

InPhase277 01-10-2009 10:13 PM

Also, some cables state they are not to be terminated with set screw connectors. I personally prefer saddle grip connectors, or even the two-screw type that resemble romex connectors.

And if you really wanted to be anal, you could get the healthcare type AC which has a bonding strip AND a green ground wire. Redundant grounding.

rgsgww 01-11-2009 01:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by InPhase277 (Post 210680)
Also, some cables state they are not to be terminated with set screw connectors. I personally prefer saddle grip connectors, or even the two-screw type that resemble romex connectors.

And if you really wanted to be anal, you could get the healthcare type AC which has a bonding strip AND a green ground wire. Redundant grounding.


I've seen the other connectors, I knew some cable couldn't be terminated with screw connectors, didn't think many cables had requirements.

Healthcare type AC? That sounds like a waste with all of that grounding. I suppose it might help in emi/rfi rejection.

InPhase277 01-11-2009 02:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rgsgww (Post 211001)

Healthcare type AC? That sounds like a waste with all of that grounding. I suppose it might help in emi/rfi rejection.

Maybe, but the Code calls for (in Art. 517) a redundant grounding system where procedures are performed on patients. This includes checkups and dental procedures. If one ground fails then there is another. Hate to kill a patient while getting his teeth cleaned:no:.

There must be at least two grounds in a metal raceway, and the raceway can be one of them. So that means everything gets wired in conduit with a ground wire pulled, or bonded AC cable with a second ground. Hospital grade receptacles are required where patients sleep.

rgsgww 01-11-2009 03:02 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by InPhase277 (Post 211025)
Maybe, but the Code calls for (in Art. 517) a redundant grounding system where procedures are performed on patients. This includes checkups and dental procedures. If one ground fails then there is another. Hate to kill a patient while getting his teeth cleaned:no:.

There must be at least two grounds in a metal raceway, and the raceway can be one of them. So that means everything gets wired in conduit with a ground wire pulled, or bonded AC cable with a second ground. Hospital grade receptacles are required where patients sleep.



Yeah, it sounds like two grounds are safer.

Hospital grade receptacles are marked with a green dot on the front, right?

I've always wondered how they wired tvss's and transfer switches in hospitals, they must be pretty big.

frenchelectrican 01-11-2009 08:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rgsgww (Post 211042)
Yeah, it sounds like two grounds are safer.

Hospital grade receptacles are marked with a green dot on the front, right?

Oui ya got it right.


Quote:

I've always wondered how they wired tvss's and transfer switches in hospitals, they must be pretty big.
Speaking of transfer switches in Hosptail they are pretty huge depending on the size and set up and many place will have more than one transfer switch the last hosptail I work on { in USA } have four yeah four transfer switches.

Here how this place set up

Generator 1 TS1 Generator 2 TS2 Normal power TS3 and there is a foruth one will shread non circital ciruits if one of the generators fail and yeah both generators are at 750 KW size each and I did ran it with load test by putting a full load run on generator power and it handle pretty good with one unit at 81% full load so both running it will take about 40ish% load each that for everything on it.

If one of the generator fail for some reason the fourth transfer swtich will active by shreading non circical circuits so that way the geneator stay at 80 % or less load on the unit { yes they can run full 750 but the way it set up only need about 600Kw }

Merci,Marc

handyman78 01-13-2009 07:57 AM

Nothing wrong with a Dremel but if you have a lot of BX to do, it would be worth buying a BX roto cutting crank type tool. For about $30. it cuts the jacket cleanly with a few turns of the handle.

rgsgww 01-13-2009 10:27 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by handyman78 (Post 211898)
Nothing wrong with a Dremel but if you have a lot of BX to do, it would be worth buying a BX roto cutting crank type tool. For about $30. it cuts the jacket cleanly with a few turns of the handle.

Yeah, I thought about it...but I don't have alot of bx to do.

frenchelectrican 01-14-2009 01:23 AM

The only time I used the dermil or air powered cutoff wheel when I get into large BX/MC cables for smaller one which it a common size I used the Rotozip it is a time saver and also prevent nicking the conductors as well.

I go thru alot in both resdentail and commercal side.

Merci,Marc

rgsgww 01-14-2009 07:20 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by frenchelectrican (Post 212369)
The only time I used the dermil or air powered cutoff wheel when I get into large BX/MC cables for smaller one which it a common size I used the Rotozip it is a time saver and also prevent nicking the conductors as well.

I go thru alot in both resdentail and commercal side.

Merci,Marc


Just a question but...do you prefer mc or romex? What do you think is better?

frenchelectrican 01-15-2009 01:12 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rgsgww (Post 212416)
Just a question but...do you prefer mc or romex? What do you think is better?


It depend on the situation where it run and there are some area the code do not allowed to run romex { right now I don't have the NEC code book due it left in the office [ Yeah I am in Paris France now }

For unfinshed garage C'est simple MC useally work fine unless you have the wall enclosed.

Merci.Marc


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