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Old 03-16-2011, 07:46 AM   #16
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How many amps are delivered to the house's main panel?


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I. It's just like transformers. If the one there is big enough to feed 3 houses, ... If 5 or 6 go in, it might not get changed. That is one reason the one at the end of my line caught fire one day. It was simply overtaxed and eventually died, in smoky flames.
There should have been a fuse up on the pole next to the transformer.
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Well, what I had in mind is to up the main breaker in the house panel to 150 or 200 amps, then run a 100 amp sub panel to the garage. That's why I was hoping to find out if there was a standard wire size used in Ontario from the lines to the house. :
While a #2 copper (or #0 aluminum) line is needed for 100 amps coming into your house, the portion strung through the air, say from a utility pole can carry somewhat more without overheating. How well it performs (how much voltage drop you get when drawing 150 to 200 amps) depends on the distance. There are usually two wire sizes for 120/240 volts (secondary lines) up on the poles, a larger size between poles and a smaller size for the service drops to the houses.

When you put in the 200 amp panel you will replace the wires from the meter to the panel. I think it is OO copper or OOO aluminum you need.

If you want to you can just go ahead with your project. Then if you do get too much voltage drop, put in a complaint to the power company.

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Old 03-16-2011, 08:16 AM   #17
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How many amps are delivered to the house's main panel?


Is it possible to purchase the new 150 or 200 amp main breaker for my existing panel, or would I have to buy a panel that has the right size main breaker already in place?

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Old 03-16-2011, 09:57 AM   #18
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How many amps are delivered to the house's main panel?


Your panel will have a label stating its capacity. What does your panel have on this label?
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Old 03-16-2011, 10:12 AM   #19
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How many amps are delivered to the house's main panel?


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Your panel will have a label stating its capacity. What does your panel have on this label?

That I will have to check once I move in. I am just trying to start planning things out for this summer, since I'd really like to have my shop up and running asap.
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Old 03-16-2011, 01:24 PM   #20
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How many amps are delivered to the house's main panel?


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AllanJ;610430]There should have been a fuse up on the pole next to the transformer.
yep, sure was. It allowed to x-former to heat up pretty good and catch fire.
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Old 03-16-2011, 02:29 PM   #21
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How many amps are delivered to the house's main panel?


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I don't know how they do things in Canada but in my area, while there is standard sizes of wires for an installation, it is not unusual to find that the service drops were never upsized when a new larger service was installed. They like to leave what is there until there is a problem and then replace it. It's just like transformers. If the one there is big enough to feed 3 houses, if a 4th house goes in, it doesn't get changed. If 5 or 6 go in, it might not get changed. That is one reason the one at the end of my line caught fire one day. It was simply overtaxed and eventually died, in smoky flames.
Its the same here in Ontario. Our engineers go to school for seven years and then sit in an office copying whatever is done in Michigan.
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Old 03-17-2011, 12:41 AM   #22
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How many amps are delivered to the house's main panel?


(This is the US standard)

The problem I see with this is

1. that his Meter Base needs to be rated for 150 or 200 amps.
2. His current panel MORE THAN LIKELY will not be able to have a 150 or 200 amp breaker "just dropped into it" 150 and 200 generally are molded case breakers
3. 4/0 Alum is the service size for 200 and 2/0 alum is service for 150. (dont go with copper is it god awful expensive)
4. His overhead is of no concern, as I was told by a POCO guy: "we dont have to abide by the NEC." Whether this is true or not is up to debate, but what i do know is that overhead, free air conductors can carry MUCH more current than service conductors..generally about 50% more...or so...
5. If you do work on the meter base, you will probably have to pull a permit to have it reconnected to the meter....

Bottom line, you can either install it next to your drop and have them switch it over, or you will have to have the knife or your service drop pulled and put back in which requires a POCO and a Permit.

Good luck partner.
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Old 03-21-2011, 11:18 AM   #23
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How many amps are delivered to the house's main panel?


Turns out I may be ahead of the game. I was under the impression that the garage just had a couple of 15 amp 110 volt circuits run from the house, but as luck would have it, the fellow I'm buying the house from worked for Ontario Hydro for years, and put 220 volt in the garage. I had a real quick look at the subpanel in the garage, it's an older screw in fuse style, but looks like it has at least 3 gauge wire running to it. Once I get a chance I'll look at how he attached it from the house.

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