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-   -   How many 4" recessed lights for a 14x22 room? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f18/how-many-4-recessed-lights-14x22-room-169259/)

CareBear 01-16-2013 02:20 AM

How many 4" recessed lights for a 14x22 room?
 
8' ceiling, 65 watt equivalent LED 4" 2700K recessed lights. Dimmable.

I read that you want 1.5x the square footage in light wattage. 1.5x14x22 = 450 watts = 7 lights. That seems like less than what people usually recommend for that size of a area for 4" lights.

Any wisdom would be appreciated.

silversport 01-16-2013 04:37 AM

The bulbs you're using should have a brightness rating in Lumens. Calculate the number of lights you need based on lumens per square foot. 20 lumens per sq-ft is a good number for general lighting in a living room or rec room - when it is supplemented by task lighting (lamp on end table for reading, etc). Of course, there are other factors. You'll probably need more than 7 lights.

CareBear 01-16-2013 04:42 AM

Thanks. 308 sq ft x 20 lumens per sq ft = 6150 lumens required. The lights are 575 lumens each, so that's 10.7 lights, which can be rounded up to 12 in order to arrange neatly.

oh'mike 01-16-2013 05:29 AM

4" cans do not have a very wide spread of light----Why have you chosen 4" instead of 6"

You need to consider the spread as well as the lumens or you will end up with uneven coverage on the walls and work surfaces or floors/

Speedy Petey 01-16-2013 07:16 AM

I would NEVER do 4" cans in a room that large for all around general lighting.

You're looking at 24 or so (depending on the pattern) if you did them for general lighting.

I would put them in sections or areas, not all over the ceiling.

Fairview 01-16-2013 08:28 AM

Trying to use a formula to determine lighting is ridiculous. With the frequent trendy thoughts going through the half a$$ed brains of interior decorators it's just impossible. Case in point. When the house was built, let's say light interior colors were the norm, and xx number of lumen s were sufficient. So as things change from light to dark, including furniture possibly or probably, now the lumen s need to be increased to xxxxxxxxxxxxxx.

Attempting to use a formula as such would be equal to doing a manual J for hvac but omitting building orientation and the number of leaking windows.

CareBear 01-16-2013 11:35 AM

People ask why 4" instead of 6". The reason is that 4" looks a lot better. 6" looks ugly and commercial. I haven't heard any designers or homeowners say otherwise, either. When I read the Home Depot reviews of these lights, there are people doing the same and they like it, such as http://reviews.homedepot.com/profile...13/profile.htm

CareBear 01-16-2013 11:37 AM

@Fairview I think you can argue that calculations are non-optimal, but I don't think you can say that they are ridiculous. Using divining rods would be ridiculous.

oh'mike 01-16-2013 12:22 PM

For even light spread they need to be about 6 feet apart---8 feet is typical for 6" cans.

Buy two and rig them up temporally to see what spacing gives you even coverage.

CareBear 01-16-2013 12:30 PM

@oh'mike thanks for the tip about testing two of them. I'm going to definitely need some 4" for the hallway, so it's not a waste to buy them if I decide afterall that I won't want 4" in the main room.

silversport 01-16-2013 12:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CareBear (Post 1094874)
People ask why 4" instead of 6". The reason is that 4" looks a lot better. 6" looks ugly and commercial. I haven't heard any designers or homeowners say otherwise, either. When I read the Home Depot reviews of these lights, there are people doing the same and they like it, such as http://reviews.homedepot.com/profile...13/profile.htm

I have 14 of the ecosmart 6" downlights (cree cr6) in my basement and I think they look great -- I also have a couple of the 4" you're considering (cree cr4) over a desk area. I did exactly as Oh'mike suggested. Bought a few and rigged them up with extension cords and Edison socket adapters to determine spacing.

Missouri Bound 01-16-2013 12:49 PM

Wattage is not an accurate measurement of light output. Lumen output is, and is part of the lamp information. It will vary with fixture design, but most fixture manufacturers have this info available.

Ocelaris 01-16-2013 12:57 PM

We just put in 8x 13w CFL 5" cans in our new house's living room. I usually aim for about 4-6 feet apart (on center) @ 13watts for compact fluorescents. We're using 5" cans because we had 6" last time and with the small CFL bulbs you see the cheap galvanized backing if you don't have a fancy trim (which we don't because it's ridiculous to pay that price). 4' apart is very bright (our last house was 4' and light colored and it was too bright) for our ~8 foot ceilings, 6' is about right. If they're not bright enough, you can always get 18w bulbs, but I prefer a lower wattage, more evenly spaced is better for distribution. These are just my personal opinions and I like it a bit brighter.

http://18buckinghamplace.com/wp-cont...1/DSC04438.jpg

fltdek 01-16-2013 11:45 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Neighbors kitchen remodel. I did (9) 4" recessed (dimmable). Looked great when it was finished. They originally picked out 5 or 6" baffled, and I said no, wouldnt install them.....so out dated!!! Ceiling wasnt painted yet in picture!!

k_buz 01-17-2013 07:41 AM

4" cans are for accent lighting, not main room lighting.


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