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Old 05-16-2013, 01:13 AM   #31
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How to figure load on a circuit


And, in all other applications, Amps = watts/volts

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Old 05-16-2013, 05:19 AM   #32
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How to figure load on a circuit


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Originally Posted by Philly Master View Post
Your basic homeowner 1/3 HP sump is about 800 running watts and 1300 starting watts ....

20 amp circuit is 2400 watts
Quote:
Originally Posted by crescere View Post
Are you saying:

Sump (at start) = 1300
Dish washer = 1100
Garbage disposal = 750
Total 3150 exceeds max of 2400
YES....

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Originally Posted by crescere View Post
Ok, I find the watts on the appliance, but where do I find the max watts for any given circuit?
already answered ......

120 v times the breaker size ... or 120 v x 20 amps= 2400 watts ... max watts on that circuit

120 x 15 amps = 1800 watts
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Old 05-16-2013, 05:38 AM   #33
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How to figure load on a circuit


A dishwasher/disposal are not listed to be on the same circuit as the sump. Likewise, a sump pump will generally require its own circuit. Since the manufacturer's specs/listing becomes part of the code, to put the sump on with these appliances is a code violation.

It is obvious the OP does not care about code compliance, so I suggest giving this poster any advice other than what code states.

Run a new circuit. If you don't want the GFI in the crawlspace, install a GFI breaker, or a deadfront GFI outside the crawlspace to feed the sump receptacle.
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Old 05-16-2013, 07:30 AM   #34
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How to figure load on a circuit


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Originally Posted by k_buz View Post
A dishwasher/disposal are not listed to be on the same circuit as the disposal. Likewise, a disposal will generally require its own circuit. Since the manufacturer's specs/listing becomes part of the code, to put the sump on with these appliances is a code violation.

It is obvious the OP does not care about code compliance, so I suggest giving this poster any advice other than what code states.

Run a new circuit. If you don't want the GFI in the crawlspace, install a GFI breaker, or a deadfront GFI outside the crawlspace to feed the sump receptacle.
...And an alarm if it is a critical sump pump.
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Old 05-16-2013, 08:14 AM   #35
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How to figure load on a circuit


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I am not at the house now, and when I am I do not have a fancy internet phone to post here. Again, I assume I just add up the amps to see if they exceed 20? Or is there some other maximum like 80%?

Yes, stay under 80%. 16A.

http://www.sears.com/ue/lawn/Sears+Generator-WattageWorksheet.pdf

http://www.housenspect.com/pdfs/07-6...ence-Guide.pdf

Appliance: Running/Starting

Sump: 1050/2200
Dishwasher: 1500/1500
Disposal: 850/2000

Quote:
Originally Posted by crescere View Post
The thing is though that the garbage disposal is certainly intermittent. No one leaves theirs on for more than a few minutes.


True, but one might typically start the dishwasher, then clean the sink, then run the disposal. If the Sump kicks on then too, all 3 are quite probably going to run at once. Not worth the risk.

Running wattage total is 3400. /120 = 28A. Way over.

Maybe your appliances are smaller. Pick what you have from the lists above.

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