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Old 02-12-2011, 03:22 PM   #16
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How does this rough in look?


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Originally Posted by Tigerloose View Post
Not much in the way of electrical work is shown but what is shown looks ok. The framing is another story. Purlins should be the same size as the rafters they support. Purlin braces should land on a bearing wall or a beam, not ceiling joists. The same holds true for ridge supports. Their appears to not be a rafter to ceiling joist connection and therefor, no rafter tie. The ceiling joist appear to have insufficient bearing on the wall top plate.
Fwiw, the inspector signed off on the work when the building was constructed last year (by the builder, not me).

I've since found other issues (such as no caulk on the hardi siding joints) that I didn't know to look for. The builder already had to rip out and redo a brand new driveway that was poured improperly (no control joints, excess surface water, cracks a week after it set up, surface rubbing off ect). The builder was paid so I am pretty much stuck with what I have. This is why I went to the library and started learning about how to wire.. at the very least I know enough not to be screwed.. and am doing most of the work myself now.

That said, what would need to be done to strengthen the roof? Can it be fortified and put right without taking the entire roof down?

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Old 02-12-2011, 08:28 PM   #17
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How does this rough in look?


I went looking for your info to see where you are from and I found another thread where GBR in WA told you the same thing I did. I suggest that you follow his advice. If I were you, I would find local, competent help as there are probably other serious issues.

As far as the building inspector passing the work; he did the job the way many jurisdictions expect, which is to leave everybody smiling. At the very least, I would ask the blind inspector's supervisor to do the inspection over.

The absence of a rafter tie can be a fatal flaw, so fix that. The worst case for the undersized purlins sitting on the ceiling joists is drywall cracks and nail popping when the wind blows or during a heavy snow load. If I were you, I'd fix that too. The ceiling joist bearing problem can be fixed with hangers and the misplaced rim joist needs a solid attachment to the top plate.

GBR mentioned the lack of shear transfer from the roof diaphragm to the walls which I could not see from the posted pictures but you should fix that too. There may be eave blocks behind the misplaced rim that serve the purpose but I didn't see the picture GBR referred to.

Last edited by Tigerloose; 02-12-2011 at 10:14 PM.
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Old 02-13-2011, 07:37 AM   #18
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How does this rough in look?


I'll save my opinions about the builder, who was paid handsomely for constructing this garage.











See anything more here?
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Old 02-13-2011, 07:44 AM   #19
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How does this rough in look?


Ok see what you mean here: http://www.nachi.org/collar-rafter-ties.htm and for purlins: http://www.hvva.org/hvvanews1-10a.jpg

Can rafter ties be 2x4's?

Last edited by sheslostcontrol; 02-13-2011 at 07:51 AM.
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Old 02-13-2011, 10:26 AM   #20
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How does this rough in look?


"See anything more here?"

Yes! But it is probably an optical illusion. A lot depends on what seismic design category you are dealing with and what building code is applicable. Assuming that this structure was built in compliance with approved, engineered blueprints, I am loathe to pick it apart from a group of pictures.
That being said, all too often, I encounter incorrect approved, engineered plans.

If seismic requirements do apply, the OSB requires solid blocking/nailing on the horizontal edges and the sheets should have been offset. There is no shear transfer from the gable roof to the foundation. The gambrel rafters provide a shear diaphragm that requires positive connection to the foundation as well. Of course, an engineer could stipulate more or less and I am no engineer.

There should be solid full depth 2x blocking between the gambrel rafters that rest on the knee wall.


Rafter ties can be 2x4, however, there is a chart, as GBR told you, that stipulates the number of 16d nails that are required and as I recall GBR pinpointed 8-16d. It is impossible to place 8-16d without splitting a 2x4, even if you drill pilot holes. 2x6 barely provides enough area and adding an A35 is always a good idea.

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