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-   -   Hot water heater Breaker???? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f18/hot-water-heater-breaker-34036/)

Bigbobdallas 12-19-2008 08:17 AM

Hot water heater Breaker????
 
What is the recommended breaker size for the hot water heater

Gary_602z 12-19-2008 08:32 AM

If electric normally 30 amp. Do you have your instructions? It may say on the side of it also.

Gary

InPhase277 12-19-2008 08:50 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bigbobdallas (Post 200104)
What is the recommended breaker size for the hot water heater

How many watts? Your average residential 30 or 40 gallon water heater is 4500 watts and usually goes on a 30 A breaker.

Gigs 12-19-2008 08:57 AM

The wire size of the circuit feeding it determines the breaker amps, not the water heater itself. Come on guys. :)

Bigbobdallas 12-19-2008 09:04 AM

Wire size
 
Ok if it is the wire size then. What wire size should I have cominy to the heater?

Bigbobdallas 12-19-2008 09:09 AM

Wire size
 
Ok if it is the wire size then. What wire size should I have coming to the heater?:thumbsup:

jerryh3 12-19-2008 09:25 AM

Depends on the heater. We need a little more info. Nameplate rating, model number, ... A "standard" water heater would be a 30A breaker on 10/2 wire.

Termite 12-19-2008 09:25 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gigs (Post 200124)
The wire size of the circuit feeding it determines the breaker amps, not the water heater itself. Come on guys. :)

Huh? The appliance manufacturer specifies the circuit ampacity, the appropriate breaker is installed, and the necessary wire size is installed based on the circuit ampacity. By your statement, he could theoretically use #14 wire and a 15 amp breaker on his water heater...And although I know that's not what you meant, it illustrates the point.

Bigbobdallas, check your water heater's manual or download the model's information from the manufacaturer's website. #10 wire and a 30 amp breaker is pretty common for residential water heaters, but not in every case. If you can't find that, provide the wattage information and as Inphase277 suggested, we can get you right in the ballpark.

Bigbobdallas 12-19-2008 09:29 AM

Breaker gets hot and flips
 
Thanks for all the info. When I get home tonight I will check this out.

I am not sure what it is but here in the last three or four days it has been flipping off ever so often and wife says it is hot.:(

Wethead 12-19-2008 09:39 AM

What brand of water heater is it?

Termite 12-19-2008 09:41 AM

Then it is doing its job! :thumbsup: Sounds to me like your breaker is undersized, which leads me to believe that there's possibly a wire size issue as well. Is it a new water heater???

Bigbobdallas 12-19-2008 09:43 AM

At Work
 
At the present time I can't remember. It is about 1 yr old and can't remember sorry.

Gigs 12-19-2008 09:44 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by thekctermite (Post 200132)
Huh? The appliance manufacturer specifies the circuit ampacity, the appropriate breaker is installed, and the necessary wire size is installed based on the circuit ampacity.

Yes, yes, but for all we knew he was eyeballing a 12/3 wire that ran near his water heater. I think it's an important distinction to make sure people understand the wire gauge determines the maximum overcurrent protection you can use. It may seem basic to us but maybe not to everyone asking questions here.

Termite 12-19-2008 12:19 PM

I just don't want it to be convoluted into making the OP think that any wire is fine as long as the breaker is sized to for it. That's a backwards approach that could easily lead to dangerous mistakes. Start with the appliance and work toward the panel and you can't go wrong.

micromind 12-19-2008 12:21 PM

Is this water heater a replacement for an older one? If so, the breaker and wire might be too small.

Years ago, it was not uncommon to have a 3000 or 4000 watt water heater fed with #12's and a 20 amp breaker. This was fine for these heaters, but most modern heaters are 4500 watts. They will trip a 20 amp breaker, and if a 30 is installed using existing wire, it'll eventually burn up the wire and likely start a fire.

A 4500 watt heater needs #10's and either a 25 or 30 amp breaker.

Rob


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