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-   -   At home 30A RV hook up (http://www.diychatroom.com/f18/home-30a-rv-hook-up-179594/)

Exjay 05-14-2013 08:50 PM

At home 30A RV hook up
 
is there a diffrence between wiring up a 30A plug outside right off the breaker panel for a RV hook up vs. say for a home dryer?

Jim Port 05-14-2013 08:55 PM

The dryer is 240 volt and either 3 or 4 wires depending on its age.

The RV will be 120 volts with one hot, a neutral and a ground.

TarheelTerp 05-14-2013 08:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Exjay (Post 1179588)
is there a diffrence between wiring up a 30A plug outside right off the breaker panel for a RV hook up vs. say for a home dryer?

Is your RV a 240Volt connection like a dryer?
Take a look at your cord.

Link

Speedy Petey 05-15-2013 05:34 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TarheelTerp (Post 1179594)
Is your RV a 240Volt connection like a dryer?

30A RV and travel trailer circuits are 120V 3-wire.
50A circuits are 120/240V 4-wire.

md2lgyk 05-15-2013 06:34 AM

Yes, there is quite a difference. RVs with 30-amp electrical have a 3-prong plug that is not used anywhere else in the U.S. The easiest way to accomplish what you want is to go to an RV parts place and buy a panel that's equipped with the necessary receptacle (a TT-30R). Mine cost about $40. You'll also need a 30-amp single pole breaker, which any big box store should have. The wiring is essentially the same as any other 120vac receptacle (hot, neutral, and ground).

Unless you need to run the air conditioner, an easier solution is to buy an adapter and a 12-gauge extension cord and just plug into one of your existing outside receptacles.

Exjay 05-15-2013 02:06 PM

Thanks guys. no, our camper is 120 30A not sure why i was thinking 240 dryer :blush:. Anyways, we have the 120 outlet adapter but on occasion it trips the outside GFCI due to the load. I would like to beable to run things for a few days (inc the AC unit and fridge) a few days before our trips out just to make sure all is good. also it convient that out camper is parked on the side of the house right next to the breaker panel which will minimize our wire run.

Jim Port 05-15-2013 02:09 PM

The GFI is not tripping due to the load. It is sensing a fault that current is leaking somewhere and shutting off. Breakers trip due to overloads.

mpoulton 05-15-2013 04:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Exjay (Post 1180009)
Thanks guys. no, our camper is 120 30A not sure why i was thinking 240 dryer :blush:. Anyways, we have the 120 outlet adapter but on occasion it trips the outside GFCI due to the load. I would like to beable to run things for a few days (inc the AC unit and fridge) a few days before our trips out just to make sure all is good. also it convient that out camper is parked on the side of the house right next to the breaker panel which will minimize our wire run.

If the GFCI is tripping, it indicates a ground fault in your trailer. This is a safety hazard and needs to be fixed. GFCIs do not trip from overloads, only from ground faults.

usair 05-15-2013 04:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mpoulton (Post 1180058)
If the GFCI is tripping, it indicates a ground fault in your trailer. This is a safety hazard and needs to be fixed. GFCIs do not trip from overloads, only from ground faults.

It may not be an issue with the RV but could be as simple as a worn cord.

FixitDragon 05-15-2013 04:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Exjay (Post 1180009)
Thanks guys. no, our camper is 120 30A not sure why i was thinking 240 dryer :blush:. Anyways, we have the 120 outlet adapter but on occasion it trips the outside GFCI due to the load. I would like to beable to run things for a few days (inc the AC unit and fridge) a few days before our trips out just to make sure all is good. also it convient that out camper is parked on the side of the house right next to the breaker panel which will minimize our wire run.


The reason you were thinking "dryer" is because up until 1996 the NEMA 10-30 receptacle could be used for dryers. The NEMA 10-30 is ungrounded 240/120VAC, but it looks A LOT like a NEMA TT-30 which is grounded 120VAC. THEY ARE NOT THE SAME! Since it was acceptable up to 1996, there is a high potential to find NEMA 10-30 in a home laundry room or garage.

There have been plenty of cases where people thought this dryer receptacle was the same as their RV plug since they look very similar, forced the plug and ZAP killed the electrical in the RV. (Go to RV.net and do a search, it is not uncommon) Sometimes even the pro's mess it up. There was a thread recently where an RVer paid a pro to install and wire a 30A 120VAC for their RV. The pro installed the proper NEMA TT-30, but wired it as 240VAC. ZAP!

Exjay 05-16-2013 06:19 AM

^ Just got done working on my dryer a week ago and maybe thats why I was thinking that. The GFCI outlet is used alot outside from x-mas lights, yard tools, battery chargers, etc and maybe a bit worn. the GFCI trips on occasion and not specifically related to my RV but sometimes on the above things also. I will start there with replacing the outlet to fix this issue but I did find a good yourube vid for properly wiring a at home RV outlet. Once I get this done I will post up some pics of my install.

Olsy 05-16-2013 04:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Exjay
^ Just got done working on my dryer a week ago and maybe thats why I was thinking that. The GFCI outlet is used alot outside from x-mas lights, yard tools, battery chargers, etc and maybe a bit worn. the GFCI trips on occasion and not specifically related to my RV but sometimes on the above things also. I will start there with replacing the outlet to fix this issue but I did find a good yourube vid for properly wiring a at home RV outlet. Once I get this done I will post up some pics of my install.

Can you post the youtube link? I am curious

sammy37 05-16-2013 06:35 PM

My GFCI used to trip with our RV at home but only because I would try to run the air and the circuit just wasnt large enough.

I ended up doing like suggested earlier. I Went to Lowes and bought a 30 amp single pole breaker, 10 gauge wire and they had had a female RV receptacle, they call it a trailer plug.

mpoulton 05-16-2013 06:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sammy37 (Post 1180768)
My GFCI used to trip with our RV at home but only because I would try to run the air and the circuit just wasnt large enough.

GFCI's do not trip from overloads. That's not what they do or how they work. If the GFCI trips, it is because current is leaving the GFCI on the hot wire but not all of it is returning through the neutral wire. The only thing the GFCI senses is this imbalance, not the total current flowing through it. If your GFCI tripped when the AC came on, it's because the AC had a ground fault.

sammy37 05-16-2013 10:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mpoulton (Post 1180770)
GFCI's do not trip from overloads. That's not what they do or how they work. If the GFCI trips, it is because current is leaving the GFCI on the hot wire but not all of it is returning through the neutral wire. The only thing the GFCI senses is this imbalance, not the total current flowing through it. If your GFCI tripped when the AC came on, it's because the AC had a ground fault.

You are correct. Now that I think back, I had to reset the breaker not the actual GFCI outlet itself.
Old age is starting to get me!:laughing:


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