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Old 01-13-2009, 12:15 PM   #1
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help with wiring diagram


Hi There.

I'm in a situation where I currently have a hexagonal box, that has a configuration (see diagrams below). This box has it, so that the power comes in from the main circuit breaker (power), then also has a wire coming in for a light fixture, and finally, there is another one coming in for a switch that controls this fixture.

Essentially, what I want to do is run power THROUGH this hexagonal box so that I can use the power from the circuit breaker in another box elsewhere, and have the switch only control the current light fixture that it switches on/off in the current box.

I mainly wanted to do this, because the circuit only has this one fixture on it, and I figured I could use it for a few more lights in my basement, without fear of any circuit being overloaded with too much.

I'm not a 'professional' by any means, but I have done wiring of switch boxes and so on, but I don't think I've encountered this situation before.

Can you provide me with some guidance about this diagram and tell me if this is proper or if there is an easier way?

Thanks in advance for your help!

P.S. Apologies for the cryptic diagrams...I'm limited in my paint skills!
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Old 01-13-2009, 12:27 PM   #2
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help with wiring diagram


Electrically your diagram is correct; though you don't need multiple wire nuts for the same purpose. Just use one per wire function (hot/neutral/ground). In other words, where your hot power is fed into the box, use one wire nut to join the incoming power, the power out to the switch's white wire, and power out to the new additon. Do the same for the incoming neutral as well, only you would tie the incoming neutral with the light fixture neutral and the new addition.

Also, by code you must color code the white wire to the switch with either a black or red mark in either tape or a marker (sharpie). This must be done at both ends of the wire to indicate the white wire is a current carrying conductor.

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Old 01-13-2009, 02:48 PM   #3
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help with wiring diagram


Thanks for your quick reply.

The only reason I tried to 'pigtail' the hot/netural ones is that I wanted to ensure consistent power to the cable that will supply power to the other box. If I remove the pigtails, won't that make it so that the switch will control the other power box too?
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Old 01-13-2009, 03:29 PM   #4
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help with wiring diagram


This will help
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Old 01-13-2009, 06:53 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mcvane View Post
Thanks for your quick reply.

The only reason I tried to 'pigtail' the hot/netural ones is that I wanted to ensure consistent power to the cable that will supply power to the other box. If I remove the pigtails, won't that make it so that the switch will control the other power box too?
I assumed that your circles over the wires were indicating wire nuts. Follow Stubbie's diagram, you only need 4 wire nuts (including the ground wires). The diagram you posted showed you using 7 and several un-needed pigtails; you don't have enough wires to need to split the connections up in multiple wire nuts.
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Old 01-14-2009, 08:16 AM   #6
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help with wiring diagram


Thanks - this is just what I needed.

I had previously come up with a wiring that made the switch give power to both the light fixture and the new unswitched power source, but I now realize my mistake before was that I used a wire nut to join the light fixture's hot, the switch's hot (black) and the unswitched power's hot. By simply moving the unswitched hot and connecting it to the hot incoming power source, it solved the problem!

Many thanks again.

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