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Old 02-01-2009, 08:34 AM   #16
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HELP - with my breaker box. Interesting issue.


What size wire is run for the dedicated circuit? Also, is this a seperate amp or a receiver/amp?

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Old 02-01-2009, 08:43 AM   #17
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HELP - with my breaker box. Interesting issue.


The wire had to be 40 feet to reach the home theater system. 14 guage wire, 15 amp breaker.

Some asked about the box before: It is a Square-D box - QO breakers.

The amp is a receiver/amp - Denon 3202
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Old 02-02-2009, 09:33 AM   #18
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HELP - with my breaker box. Interesting issue.


Well... I will call the power company and have them check things on the line outside, but I am not convinced that that will solve this issue.

Am I correct in saying that voltage fluctuates in any given household?

Since my amp appears to be very sensitive to drops in voltage, the only solution that I have been able to find that looks like it would act as a permanent solution is the monster power avs-2000 automatic voltage stabilizer.

It takes 80-140 volt input and spits out exactly 120v at all times.

I hesitated to go this route in the first place because I didn't want to 'cover up' a problem in my house's wiring by buying the avs-2000.

But after replacing the breakers, and noticing an effect, the breaker replacement obviously helped the electrical well-being of my home.

Since there is really no way that I can control the voltage swings from the power company, this looks like my only route.

As an added bonus, having clean 120v power at all times is probably better for my amp/htpc/projector anyway.

Thanks to everyone who helped out!
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Old 02-02-2009, 09:48 AM   #19
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HELP - with my breaker box. Interesting issue.


Have you tried plugging the amp into a different circuit?
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Old 02-02-2009, 10:32 AM   #20
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HELP - with my breaker box. Interesting issue.


Ugh...monster...I would go with an isolation transformer.

http://www.tripplite.com/EN/products...xtSeriesID=324

This one is rated at 1000 watts.

If you need more wattage...find a different one. They go up to 20 amps.

Voltage stabilizers aren't as good as isolation transformers. I suppose the ultimate setup would be an isolation transformer with a voltage stabilizer plugged into it.

Last edited by rgsgww; 02-02-2009 at 10:36 AM.
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Old 02-02-2009, 01:41 PM   #21
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HELP - with my breaker box. Interesting issue.


I read up on that link you gave me.

I then called Tripp-lite to ask about it.

That unit is mainly for line noise filtering, but not covering dips in voltage as much.

They discussed a UPS that they sell that passes all its power through its inverter, and all the output is at 120V at all times. (+- 2%).

This may be the road I take unless I get a great deal on a used monster AVS. But Monster is SO overpriced.

newegg link to the ups:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16842111064
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Old 02-02-2009, 01:44 PM   #22
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HELP - with my breaker box. Interesting issue.


Tripplite might be better in some cases than monster.

I have a tripplite 20 amp rack mount strip. It is pretty nice quality.
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Old 02-02-2009, 02:12 PM   #23
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HELP - with my breaker box. Interesting issue.


I am just about done with this problem though, and the monster avs-2000 keeps the voltage crazy close to 120v at all times - like 119.5-120.5v.

I already have a UPS system too. So I would feel silly buying another one..

(I also have like 10 other ones in the house that I have collected, so I don't need another.)

The avs-2000 weighs something like 60lbs... hopefully they have stuffed it with all I need and more.
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Old 02-02-2009, 04:09 PM   #24
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HELP - with my breaker box. Interesting issue.


Is the sound less likely to cut out of the volume is not that high?

You might want to measure voltage at the panel to see whether the whole house (or one side of the line, that serves more or less half of your house) drops to 106 volts. Have an electrician help you do yet more measurements, on the line side of the main breaker, both legs. If you attach a thin, say 20 or 22 gauge, insulated wire to the end of your voltmeter probe to poke at the main breaker contacts, this is no more dangerous than measuring the 120 volts at a receptacle.

For good measure, retorque (tighten) the various connections in the main panel including grounds and neutrals connected to the respective bus bars and the individual wires entering each breaker. (Don't do the main breaker yourself.) Do not use tremendous strength. With it switched off, each breaker might be unsnapped from the panel and re-inserted twice; this cleans the contact underneath with the bus bar fins. If breakers fit loosely, there could be burned contacts underneath requiring replacing the breaker and also finding another slot (or a subpanel) for it.
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Last edited by AllanJ; 02-02-2009 at 04:19 PM.
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Old 02-02-2009, 05:52 PM   #25
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HELP - with my breaker box. Interesting issue.


Make sure neutrals and grounds are not in the same lug (with the main off)
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Old 02-02-2009, 05:54 PM   #26
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HELP - with my breaker box. Interesting issue.


Forgive my electronic ignorance... "lug"?

Is that the bar/strip with holes in it that the neutral/grounds screw into?

I asked earlier in this thread if neutral and grounds can be screwed in the same one, and I got an affirmative.

Now I am wondering.
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Old 02-02-2009, 06:11 PM   #27
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HELP - with my breaker box. Interesting issue.


Quote:
Originally Posted by LordX View Post
Forgive my electronic ignorance... "lug"?

Is that the bar/strip with holes in it that the neutral/grounds screw into?

I asked earlier in this thread if neutral and grounds can be screwed in the same one, and I got an affirmative.

Now I am wondering.

They just cant be together in the same hole.
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Old 02-02-2009, 06:31 PM   #28
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HELP - with my breaker box. Interesting issue.


I see.

I have heard different on that too.. (not questioning you, just letting you know what I heard).

So... can two grounds be in the same hole? Can two neutrals?
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Old 02-02-2009, 08:37 PM   #29
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HELP - with my breaker box. Interesting issue.


Quote:
Originally Posted by LordX View Post
I see.

I have heard different on that too.. (not questioning you, just letting you know what I heard).

So... can two grounds be in the same hole? Can two neutrals?
Most panels 2 grounds can be in the same hole, however under no circumstances can more than one neutral be in the same hole. Only one neutral per hole, no exceptions. Check the label on your panel near the neutral bar or on the panel cover to see how many grounds the bar is rated for. Also, make sure if your panel is rated for 2 grounds per hole that you use the same size wire; do not mix and match the wire sizes.
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Old 02-02-2009, 09:01 PM   #30
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HELP - with my breaker box. Interesting issue.


This can't be right; I'd look for recalls or technical service bulletins on this problem.

The internal power supply capacitors that furnish current for your music power rating (vs. your sine wave power rating) should hold up the sound for several tenths of a second.

Since it goes off and on instantly I'd say internal logic is shutting something on and off.

This unit is too touchy.

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