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Old 11-02-2010, 09:40 AM   #1
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Im in the process of adding another room to my welding shop. I know a little about circuits but not too much. I'm wanting to have each 1000w-1200w tools on its own outlet. Should my circuits be 120v or 240v. I know the 240v uses less amps, so i should be able to plug in a smaller tool in the same outlet as each of the 1000w-1200w outlet right? correct me if I'm wrong. im assuming for each circuit for my setup:

120v circuit= 20amps=(1000w-1200w) plus a small tool plugged in this circuit

or

240v circuit=15amps(1000w-1200w) plus a small tool plugged in this circuit

also i will need a total of 6 circuits either 120v or 240v. Please keep in mind that these tools are high wattage. An electrician told me that its best to add a sub panel just for that room.


Last edited by watsupbud; 11-02-2010 at 09:41 AM. Reason: miss typed
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Old 11-02-2010, 09:56 AM   #2
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Do the tools have plugs and cords on them? If they don't list the current requirement and voltage for each power tool. We need to know more about these power tools before we can advise you.

The tools do not sound like like high wattage tools to me. A hair dryer is rated around 1500 watts.


Last edited by J. V.; 11-02-2010 at 09:58 AM.
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Old 11-02-2010, 11:40 AM   #3
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1000- 1200 watts can easily be run on a 15 amp 120 volt circuit. That's only 8-10 amps.
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Old 11-02-2010, 12:57 PM   #4
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In addition, 1000 watts at 120 is still 1000 watts at 240. The ampacity will be different.

Like joed said, a 15 amp circuit will handle these loads.
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Old 11-03-2010, 06:55 AM   #5
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Originally Posted by J. V. View Post
Do the tools have plugs and cords on them? If they don't list the current requirement and voltage for each power tool. We need to know more about these power tools before we can advise you.

The tools do not sound like like high wattage tools to me. A hair dryer is rated around 1500 watts.

They probably won,t but we do sometimes get old equipment which uses lots of wattage. Like adding in a portable ac when the summer time comes around. I just want the shop to run smooth and safe. Thanks
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Old 11-03-2010, 07:01 AM   #6
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Is it best to add a subpanel from the main panel. (its about 50 feet from main box to the new room) Or should I get him to build a box with these circuits 6x15amps on 120v using 1000-1200w and have it plugged into the dryer outlet since we do have a dryer outlet thats not being used and is closer.
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Old 11-03-2010, 07:04 AM   #7
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Cables are not made to be used with plugs on the ends. Flexible cords are not to be used as a substitute for permanent wiring.

The subpanel is the code compliant and best option.
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Old 11-03-2010, 07:30 AM   #8
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Im asking these questions because I recently hired an electrician and i purchase over $600 worth of materials that i did not see in the other room we expanded. Please list, add, or correct me if I'm wrong on the things I will need to get the job done.

I know im going to need:

6x15amp breakers

What size amp service breaker will i need. I know I will need to purchase 2. One from the main breaker and one for the subpanel. I believe they are double pole breakers for each correct? Do i have to find out the total amp in the main first in order to add an amp service breaker. Or how does this work to begin the connection from main to sub.

What size should i get for the wire from the main to the sub? I know depending on the amp service size and distance.

6 Receptacles

Correct wiring gauge size for the 15amp circuits.

Of course the subpanel

If anything is missing please add. I greatly appreciate your time for helping. Thanks in advance
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Old 11-03-2010, 07:30 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Port View Post
Cables are not made to be used with plugs on the ends. Flexible cords are not to be used as a substitute for permanent wiring.

The subpanel is the code compliant and best option.
Ok thanks!
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Old 11-03-2010, 07:51 AM   #10
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You do not need a breaker in your subpanel. You can get a MLO (Main Lug Only) panel to use as a sub. You can get a main breaker if you want a local disconnect. If you get a Main Breaker panel to use as a sub, the size of the breaker can be larger than necessary. Meaning, if you decide on a 60A subpanel, you can get a 100A main breaker panel to use as the sub, as long as you feed it with a 60A double-pole breaker from your main.

15A circuits require 14AWG wire.
20A circuits require 12AWG wire.

It probably wouldn't be much more expensive to just run 20A circuits instead of 15A.

Like you said, the wire size you use to feed your sub will depend on the breaker size you choose to feed it with (in your main panel). It also depends on the type of wire you use. I would recommend a 60A breaker feeding your panel with 4x 6AWG THHN/THWN wires in conduit.
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Last edited by secutanudu; 11-03-2010 at 07:54 AM.
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Old 11-03-2010, 09:23 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by secutanudu View Post
You do not need a breaker in your subpanel. You can get a MLO (Main Lug Only) panel to use as a sub. You can get a main breaker if you want a local disconnect. If you get a Main Breaker panel to use as a sub, the size of the breaker can be larger than necessary. Meaning, if you decide on a 60A subpanel, you can get a 100A main breaker panel to use as the sub, as long as you feed it with a 60A double-pole breaker from your main.

15A circuits require 14AWG wire.
20A circuits require 12AWG wire.

It probably wouldn't be much more expensive to just run 20A circuits instead of 15A.

Like you said, the wire size you use to feed your sub will depend on the breaker size you choose to feed it with (in your main panel). It also depends on the type of wire you use. I would recommend a 60A breaker feeding your panel with 4x 6AWG THHN/THWN wires in conduit.
So i guess your saying if i dont go with the MLO it should look like this:

the 60amp double looks like this im guessing at the store [][]=60a with a wire coming out of each of the [] []

[add 100A Breaker to main]
l l
l l
l l
l l
l l
[60Amp] [double Pole]
l l
[20Amp] [20Amp]
l l
[20Amp] [20Amp]
l l
[20Amp] [20Amp]

Woudnt I need something larger than the double pole 60A for the subpanel?
Because each 20amp breaker will be using about 9amps which is 56amps total? Plus if i add any small tool while the 9amps are being used.



If i go with MLO. It should look like this?


[add 100A Breaker to main]
l l
l l
l l
l l
l l
M L O -B O X
l l
[20Amp] [20Amp]
l l
[20Amp] [20Amp]
l l
[20Amp] [20Amp]
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Old 11-03-2010, 09:33 AM   #12
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Well if you want a 60A subpanel, you have to feed it with a 60A breaker in main, not 100A.The 100A breaker if you get a main breaker subpanel (or whatever size you end up with) would go on the subpanel side.

A 60A breaker in the main panel ensures that the wires feeding the sub never get more than 60A. Oh, and if you do THHN in conduit and 60A, the ground wire can be 10AWG.

If your calculated load is 55A or below, you can use #6 NM cable (6-3 w/ ground) instead of THHN in conduit.

If it were me, I'd run it in conduit - safer.
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Last edited by secutanudu; 11-03-2010 at 09:37 AM.
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Old 11-03-2010, 01:15 PM   #13
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How many tools will you have in operation at the same time? Are they all 9 amp draws?
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Old 11-03-2010, 04:43 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Port View Post
How many tools will you have in operation at the same time? Are they all 9 amp draws?

Yes, majority of the time 9 amps on each circuit will be on at the same time, plus the extra outlet with the 9 amps is open and maybe a small tool with be connected to it like a fan, radio, phone charger, laptop. etc

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