Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Electrical

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 08-10-2007, 10:30 PM   #1
Newbie
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 2
Rewards Points: 0
Share |
Default

Help with electrical sub panel


I know it is kind of long, but any help would be loved very much....

I have a 200 amp electrical panel outside. It has a 2 - 60 amp breakers....one for the furnance and an inside sub panel in the garage. It has a 50 amp breaker for the range. 2 - 30 amp breakers for the water heater and the dryer and one 40 amp for the a/c.

The subpanel that i have in the garage, which is tied to the 60 amp breaker to the outside panel, has 15 - 20 amp breakers for all the outlets in the rest of the outlets in the house and the garage.

I want to install another sub panel in the garage for my woodworking shop. My table saw requires a 25 amp (220) and i want to install another 25 or 30 amp for future use (just in case i need it) and maybe two more 20 amp breakers for regular 110 outlets.

So, my question, if i put a 60 amp breaker in the main panel and then have a 60 or 100 amp subpanel in the garage with a 25 amp, 30 amp, and 2 - 20 amp breakers, would i be overloading my breker box? Also, the distance to my garage to the main panel is between 60 and 70 feet. Would an 8/3 wire be sufficient?

Any help and idea would really really really be appreciated and helpful.

Thanks,
Chris

chrismc77 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2007, 06:40 AM   #2
Master Electrician
 
JohnJ0906's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Baltimore, MD
Posts: 332
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Help with electrical sub panel


8-3 is not sufficeint for a 60 amp sub-panel. You need #6 copper. NOT romex. Use SE cable, or conduit. (#6 romex is 55 amps, #6 SE is 65 amps)

I highly doubt that adding a table saw and a few outlets will overload a 200 amp panel.

__________________
John from Baltimore
One Day at a Time
"Experience is what you get when you were expecting something else"
"The bitterness of low quality lingers long after the sweetness of low cost is forgotten"
JohnJ0906 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2007, 10:44 PM   #3
retired
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Idaho
Posts: 108
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Help with electrical sub panel


You do have a single 200 amp main breaker in the panel box outside, correct? If so, adding more breakers is no problem. If not, you will have to install one in order to add more breakers in that box.
dmaceld is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2007, 10:55 PM   #4
Custom Cabinet Maker
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Netcong NJ
Posts: 1,097
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Help with electrical sub panel


chris: what kind of tablesaw do you have????????? 25 amp 220v is one heck of a lot!!!!!!! My Delta runs 220v and a 15A circuit. It doesn't even draw that much.
skymaster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-12-2007, 12:39 PM   #5
Newbie
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 2
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Help with electrical sub panel


Quote:
Originally Posted by skymaster View Post
chris: what kind of tablesaw do you have????????? 25 amp 220v is one heck of a lot!!!!!!! My Delta runs 220v and a 15A circuit. It doesn't even draw that much.
I just bought a Grizzly 1023slw...it is 3hp 220v single phase...

Also, what exactly does the SE mean when John said to use SE #6?

Thanks again for all the help that you have provided.

Chris
chrismc77 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-12-2007, 12:46 PM   #6
Custom Cabinet Maker
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Netcong NJ
Posts: 1,097
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Help with electrical sub panel


Chris: damn still hard to believe 25 amps @ 220v. That equates to a 50 amp circuit at 110 !!!!!!!! I dont doubt you I think I would double check the manual and if it says 25 I would be calling Grizzly to verify the manual
My Delta contractor is 1.5 hp and at 220 I pull 7.5

I do believe that SE #6 means Service Entrance cable.
JackM
skymaster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-12-2007, 02:36 PM   #7
retired
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Idaho
Posts: 108
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Help with electrical sub panel


Quote:
Originally Posted by chrismc77 View Post
Also, what exactly does the SE mean when John said to use SE #6?
SE is Service Entrance, USE is underground service entrance. If you can route the wire underground and/or through conduit consider using #4 aluminum 3-wire cable. I don't recall what it's commonly called, triplex something or other, but it's 3 wires twisted together and used for service entrance feeds. It can be run in conduit or buried directly. The #4 is more capacity than what you need, but it's the least expensive wire there is for what you need. I bought some to use for a 50 amp temporary service at Lowes for about $1.18/ft. That was for all 3 wires together. Copper #6 will cost close to that for each strand.

If you use aluminum for the feeder be sure to use anti-oxidant compound on the connections in the panel boxes.

dmaceld is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
HELP! Distance between hot water tank and electrical panel? jacknewton Electrical 11 11-05-2011 06:50 AM
This doesnt seem right. JoulesWinfield Electrical 27 07-26-2009 07:40 PM
Circuit breaker panel - Advice needed justtired Electrical 15 12-13-2007 05:55 AM
Splice in Neutral to Panel - OK or Not? allpraisebob Electrical 4 08-12-2006 05:54 AM
Adding new circuit breakers to 100 amp sub panel DrP Electrical 8 05-25-2006 10:05 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.