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-   -   having trouble with the gfci tripping (http://www.diychatroom.com/f18/having-trouble-gfci-tripping-22017/)

paul110h 06-09-2008 02:55 PM

having trouble with the gfci tripping
 
I am trying to plug in a spare fridge in my garage... but it keeps tripping the GFCI. We I plug the fridge directly into the GFCI outlet it trips pretty much instantly, and when I plug the fridge into the normal garage outlet on the other side it trips after about 10-20 seconds of the fridge running.

What can I do?

Thanks
Paul

KUIPORNG 06-09-2008 03:10 PM

Well, the circuit is unable to support your fidge
 
You kind of answer yourself.... base on your experiment... different outlets under different circuit tripped.... or even different outlets under same circuit but one is GFCI protected one is not tripped probably same answer:

there is likely that somthing wrong with the fridge, or the circuit you are testing have loads in it making it unable to handle the extra load...

So your first goal is probably find out if the fridge a good working fridge. If step one is prove positive... then you do further investigation....

to find answer of step one, you can try use a outlet which should have enough capacity to handle the fridge...etc.

jbfan 06-09-2008 03:11 PM

Replace the fridge.

BigJimmy 06-09-2008 03:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by KUI****G (Post 128983)
to find answer of step one, you can try use a outlet which should have enough capacity to handle the fridge...etc.

Disagree. All this proves is that if a ground fault exists, its magnitude is less than the trip rating of the non-GFCI OCPD. The fact that the GFCI (assuming that this is a recept type) trips immediately tells you there is definitely a problem with the refridgerator.

Listen to JBFan. Time to go shopping.

handy man88 06-09-2008 03:50 PM

Yes, you could override this tripping problem by plugging into a regular outlet, but over time, you might get electrocuted or cause a fire in the house.

paul110h 06-09-2008 05:32 PM

Thanks folks, but the fridge has worked fine in the past it was plug into the garage at my old place and it worked fine for a year+

I also replaced the GFCI to eliminate that as a possibility

Any other ideas anyone can think of?

pothiel 06-09-2008 05:42 PM

You should not put it on a GFCI The Code does not require GFCI for refe's

wirenut1110 06-09-2008 05:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by pothiel (Post 129032)
You should not put it on a GFCI The Code does not require GFCI for refe's

If it's in a garage it does. Of course with exceptions.

BigJimmy 06-09-2008 07:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by pothiel (Post 129032)
You should not put it on a GFCI The Code does not require GFCI for refe's

But, it is perfectly fine to do so (the code does not forbid it nor is there an operational issue/incompatibility between the two).

OP-

You mention that it ran for a year, but how old is it? Since it trips the GFCI immediately but runs for a while before tripping out the non-GFCI breaker (is this your case), it sounds like you have a winding short in a motor. The heat from operation can exacerbate this condition to the point where the fault would exceed the breakers trip setting over time. Did you just move it and if so, could it have been damaged in transit?

Jimmy

chris75 06-09-2008 07:15 PM

I agree with the others time for a new fridge, the thing is probably way past its prime to be energy efficient anyways.

chris75 06-09-2008 07:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by pothiel (Post 129032)
You should not put it on a GFCI The Code does not require GFCI for refe's


The codes are also getting stricter on GFCI protection, no more exceptions to the rule.

paul110h 06-09-2008 09:57 PM

Thank You!
 
You're probably right it maybe time to give the old girl a rest.


Thank you all for your input

Paul

handy man88 06-10-2008 12:05 AM

I had the same problem with a toaster oven going bad. Whenever I turned it on, the head of the cord would get hot. Finally, when it was turned on, I smelled smoke and upon further investigation, the GFCI burned. Appliances gone bad can do that to you.

pothiel 06-10-2008 07:39 PM

Refridgerators will not work with a GFCI. When you wire one you never use an GFCI. You will end up with nuisance trips. GFCI do not work well with the compressors. The problem is you are putting it in the garrage. If you wire it in the garrage it must be a single outlet on a separate circuit.

chris75 06-10-2008 08:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by pothiel (Post 129364)
Refridgerators will not work with a GFCI. When you wire one you never use an GFCI. You will end up with nuisance trips. GFCI do not work well with the compressors. The problem is you are putting it in the garrage. If you wire it in the garrage it must be a single outlet on a separate circuit.

Completely untrue, gfci's work just fine with refrigerators. and no such thing as a nuisance trip, unless your life is a nuisance of course.... The 2008 NEC is doing away with the single receptacle rule so now every receptacle located in the garage, basement etc must be GFCI protected, the seperate circuit is not code nor probably needed.

Just for fun... I run my basement freezer, sump-pump, aquarium pumps, heaters & filters all on GFCI's, I have never once had a problem. Not would I think there would be one.


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