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-   -   Has my electrician done a dangerous wiring job? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f18/has-my-electrician-done-dangerous-wiring-job-130454/)

Homervanderjazz 01-18-2012 06:36 AM

Has my electrician done a dangerous wiring job?
 
Hi I recently had an electrician do a bit of re-wiring to a light switch, however he has run the wires horizontally from the light switch to the fuse box. One of my friends has had a look and said this is dangerous as the wires should go up through the ceiling or down through the floorboards. So my question is is this dangerous and should I get them to re do it as my friend says? Thanks

bob22 01-18-2012 06:48 AM

A picture would help a lot.
Which room; are the walls finished or the studs exposed?

jproffer 01-18-2012 07:20 AM

The wires HAVE to run horizontally...otherwise all the electricity will run out. :jester:


But really, what (does your friend think) is the difference?

Horizontal vs. Vertical......who cares?

Snav 01-18-2012 07:20 AM

Horizontal travelers are perfectly acceptable as long as they're secured in place and strung properly. . . sometimes verticals aren't possible at all depending on access.

What's the danger hazard? Hanging pictures or something of that nature?

Whether it's verticle or horizontal the potential to snag a wire is the same - but should be minimal if you're not using a 2" nail to get the job done. Whenever you're puncturing a wall for any purpose you should use a stud finder or electrical-wire detector ot make sure you're safe.

joed 01-18-2012 07:21 AM

Horizontal by itself is not a problem. There could be other contributing factors however.

AllanJ 01-18-2012 07:32 AM

Wires may be run on the surface of the wall in any direction, protected from physical damage using such means as Wiremold(tm) or cylindrical conduit. Wires may be run across a ceiling in any direction but must be fastened to a running board if passing between open rafters or joists less than 1-1/4" from the bottom edges.

Wires may be fished through walls and ceilings and floors in any direction. It is not required to make larger or additional breaks in the surface to allow for stapling or other fastening within.

HouseHelper 01-18-2012 09:35 AM

Horizontal, vertical, up, down, loop-d-loop, it doesn't matter.

Homervanderjazz 01-18-2012 09:39 AM

Re
 
Hi I have tried a variety of attemps to post pictures but it keeps saying size is too big so I am posting a link to where I have posted pictures midway down the page. Please have a look and let me know what your thoughts are. Thanks


http://www.electriciansforums.co.uk/...iring-job.html

if you click on the pictures it should enlarge them

bob22 01-18-2012 09:54 AM

Pictures have more impact than the description.
He cut a channel in plaster to just above lath and ran the cable. I don't think that would pass in the US (evidently the OP is from Europe?).

Hardway 01-18-2012 11:07 AM

unable to view pixs

bob22 01-18-2012 12:52 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Here's one:
Attachment 44276

AllanJ 01-18-2012 12:59 PM

For all intents and purposes that does not work because you need nailing plates to protect the wires. Since there is wood (stud or lath or both) behind the whole length of the cable and the cable is less than 1-3/4 inches behind the finshed wall surface, nailing plates (they're typically 1-1/2 x3 inches with hanging chad like prongs to pound into the stud) must be strung consecutively covering the entire route of the cable.

Hardway 01-18-2012 01:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AllanJ (Post 826841)
For all intents and purposes that does not work because you need nailing plates to protect the wires. Since there is wood (stud or lath or both) behind the whole length of the cable and the cable is less than 1-3/4 inches behind the finshed wall surface, nailing plates must be strung consecutively covering the entire route of the cable.

I have seen this done behind the base board. But then I have seen a space heater in a garage being supplied by a green garden hose laying on the ground from the house.
So I am going to have to say that it won’t pass and agree with Allen.

joed 01-18-2012 05:22 PM

What is your location? The link you posted goes to a UK board.
That installation is not permitted in North America unless you put some protection over the cables. The cables need to be protected. You can not simply plaster over those cables.

Homervanderjazz 01-18-2012 06:09 PM

re
 
Well I have contacted a building standards officer and sent him the pictures, he will get back to me tomo and we will find out what he has to say. I will keep you all posted, I am UK based by the way. Thanks for all the input.


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