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-   -   Hard wire or not to hard wire into switch heater (http://www.diychatroom.com/f18/hard-wire-not-hard-wire-into-switch-heater-171307/)

GRed 02-07-2013 01:48 PM

Hard wire or not to hard wire into switch heater
 
I'm getting my furnace replaced and I been hearing about getting it hard wired into a switch instead of an outlet. Some have said its necessary and others have to protect the warranty from the manufacturer. One even said he didnt and kept blowing thermal coupler and he thinks its because of that...Any ideas on this

Thanks

Jim Port 02-07-2013 01:57 PM

Furnaces are not listed for use with a flexible cord. I have never seen one not hardwired.

A service switch is needed to kill the power while the unit is serviced.

GRed 02-07-2013 02:01 PM

Hard wired
 
Not anymore mine is over 30 yrs old I know it needs to be piped out of the unit. Then it can be flex with a drip leg...I'm referring to the outlet it generally is plugged into..does that need to be hard wired Into a switch to turn off and on when not in use.

TarheelTerp 02-07-2013 02:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by GRed (Post 1111723)
Not anymore.

Oh.
Be sure to come back and tell us how it turns out.

Jim Port 02-07-2013 03:34 PM

Furnaces should not be plugged into receptacles. Are you saying yours was or is?

AllanJ 02-07-2013 05:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by GRed (Post 1111712)
I'm getting my furnace replaced and I been hearing about getting it hard wired into a switch instead of an outlet. Some have said its necessary and others have to protect the warranty from the manufacturer. One even said he didnt and kept blowing thermal coupler and he thinks its because of that...Any ideas on this

Thanks

Blowing the thermocouple has nothing to do with the way the furnace is wired.

Permanent or fixed installations of equipment should not use cords and plugs and receptacles for the electrical connection.

If you wish to power the furnace using a generator connected via extension cord, use a double pole double throw switch for the service switch with the common terminals connected to the furnace lead (hot and neutral) and one traveler terminal group connected to the power feed (hot and neutral). Connect the other traveler terminal group to line going to a male receptacle. The extension cord from the generator is plugged on here.

GRed 02-07-2013 05:21 PM

furnace
 
3 Attachment(s)
yes my furnace is over 30 yrs on and it was plugged in to an outlet. are you saying its required to have a switch?Attachment 65176

Attachment 65177

Attachment 65178

gold flex coming out of the unit.. now it has to be hard piped in then flex from that point with a drip leg. the reason im asking is Im planning to do this myself..and selling our house and dont want a buyer to have to negotiate against it, however, once I do it what are the chances of a buyer asking for a city inspection vs a home inspection, i just talked with a realtor and she said once they see a new furnace they will ask for a city inspection.. I thought...hmmmm im not soo sure about that. I asked the same realtor if I dont change it out what would the inspector say and she said as long as its functional and running it will pass... hmm to me that kinda contradicts what she said previously. what are your thoughts am I wrong?

TarheelTerp 02-07-2013 05:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by GRed (Post 1111838)
my furnace is over 30 yrs on and it was plugged in to an outlet.
are you saying its required to have a switch?

Even 30 years ago it was.

Oso954 02-07-2013 06:05 PM

I don' know whether it is a local code amendment or perhaps a different definition of furnace. But it is quite common (here) for a central heating (forced air) gas "heater" to come with an appliance cord. They are plugged into a fused outlet. Pull the plug to service the unit.

mpoulton 02-07-2013 06:10 PM

When I was a kid in Vermont, the furnaces in both houses we lived in were plugged into fused receptacle/switch combo devices mounted next to the furnace. I think I remember that from a house in Nebraska when I was much younger, too.

k_buz 02-07-2013 06:15 PM

Unless there is a local amendment, or the furnace is listed to be cord and plug connected, it is not legal to cord connect a furnace.

diystephen 02-07-2013 06:59 PM

I've searched on this issue myself in previous years, and there always seems to be an argument between folks in the business. Seems there are inspectors that pass it, and those that won't. I'd venture to guess it's not allowed, but I'm now hearing of areas around the country where it seems to be standard practice (parts of Louisiana, and California are ones I've heard recently.)

When it comes to generator use, I've always thought that a cord and plug solution beats a suicide cord (or any other hack job a homeowner can do.) After all, one of the main reasons homeowners try to backfeed their home is for the furnace.

Missouri Bound 02-07-2013 07:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Oso954 (Post 1111868)
I don' know whether it is a local code amendment or perhaps a different definition of furnace. But it is quite common (here) for a central heating (forced air) gas "heater" to come with an appliance cord. They are plugged into a fused outlet. Pull the plug to service the unit.

I find that very unlikely. All central funaces need to be hardwired and should have a disconnect at the furnace location. Code does not permit plugging it in. Portable heaters are another story.:yes:

Kyle_in_rure 02-07-2013 08:54 PM

In my area, regular 120V natural gas furnaces are almost always plugged into a dedicated outlet with a flexible appliance cord, not hard-wired. They pass inspection too.

Jim Port 02-07-2013 08:58 PM

Kyle, where is here?


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