Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Electrical

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 06-21-2008, 05:17 PM   #16
Once fried, twice shy.
 
elkangorito's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Thailand
Posts: 251
Share |
Default

Grounding VS Bonding


Quote:
Originally Posted by elkangorito View Post
Please explain.
Ok. Obviously the "please explain" is in the "too hard" basket for you.

Allow me to make this easier for you.

Should an appropriately qualified person also be a teacher? If so, what would you charge to give people lessons about electrical principles? Are "qualified" people allowed to officially teach unqualified people? How would you explain "technical detail" to a customer, if they asked?

__________________
Switchboard design engineer & Licensed Electrician (Australia).
elkangorito is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-21-2008, 05:17 PM   #17
Electrical Contractor
 
wirenut1110's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Chester, VA.
Posts: 1,046
Send a message via AIM to wirenut1110
Default

Grounding VS Bonding


Name:  beat a dead horse.gif
Views: 1544
Size:  7.3 KB
wirenut1110 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-21-2008, 05:18 PM   #18
Once fried, twice shy.
 
elkangorito's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Thailand
Posts: 251
Default

Grounding VS Bonding


Quote:
Originally Posted by wirenut1110 View Post
Is that someone trying to have sex with a horse?
__________________
Switchboard design engineer & Licensed Electrician (Australia).
elkangorito is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-21-2008, 05:20 PM   #19
Electrical Contractor
 
wirenut1110's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Chester, VA.
Posts: 1,046
Send a message via AIM to wirenut1110
Default

Grounding VS Bonding


No, it's called "beating a dead horse"
wirenut1110 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-21-2008, 05:26 PM   #20
Once fried, twice shy.
 
elkangorito's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Thailand
Posts: 251
Default

Grounding VS Bonding


Quote:
Originally Posted by wirenut1110 View Post
No, it's called "beating a dead horse"
Bloody hell, you're right Wirenut! No wonder Stubbie is not around. He's sick of beating a dead horse. I think I'll do the same...relax a bit.

Ok BillyD, you & your mates can give all the electrical advice required. I just hope that your advice doesn't kill anyone.

Bye
__________________
Switchboard design engineer & Licensed Electrician (Australia).
elkangorito is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-21-2008, 07:09 PM   #21
Licensed Electrical Cont.
 
Speedy Petey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: NY State
Posts: 6,778
Default

Grounding VS Bonding


elkangorito, what is your point, and what is your purpose? Are you here simply to stir up shyt?

If you see something that is incorrect simply correct it if you can. If it takes some sarcasm to get the point across so be it. You are just being arrogant here instead.

You want to show what a big shot you are come over to Electriciantalk.com and show us your stuff.
__________________
Sometimes I feel like if I answer any more questions it is like someone trying to climb over a fence to jump off a bridge and me giving them a boost.
Answers based on the 2008 & 2011 NEC. If you're on the '14 already I feel sorry for you.
Speedy Petey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-21-2008, 11:04 PM   #22
Registered User
 
Termite's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 6,520
Default

Grounding VS Bonding


Quote:
Originally Posted by elkangorito View Post
"Equipotential bonding" exists for a reason that has nothing to do with immediate "personal" protection.
Not trying to pick your words apart, but that statement is full of holes. You can't call people out for supposedly giving bad information and then make a statement like that. I recognize that you explain your stance on the importance of earthing and bonding, but lack of bonding will kill you just as quick as lack of, or improper earthing/clearing of a fault. They're equally important.

Equipotential bonding grids exist in and around pools for the sole purpose of personal protection. Metal parts are bonded on all sorts of electrical equipment for protection from gradient differences in voltage...I call that personal protection.

Last edited by Termite; 06-21-2008 at 11:11 PM.
Termite is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-22-2008, 11:12 AM   #23
nap
You talking to me?
 
nap's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: sw mi
Posts: 5,407
Default

Grounding VS Bonding


Quote:
Originally Posted by elkangorito View Post
Hi Stubbie.

Are you doing what I am doing? Are you amused by the incorrect advice by the "closet" electricians? I'm totally amused. If they keep up their "good" work, they may get someone killed.

There must be a million electrical threads on the internet. ALL of them attract unqualified people. On the odd occasion, the qualified people are WRONG!!!!! The only way to secure a correct answer is to question the answerer. A "qualified" person should be able to mathematically, physically & chemically give a correct explanation. This explanation can usually be easily checked.

Bonding & Earthing are two different things with two different purposes. This situation exists for most other countries besides America.

"Equipotential bonding" exists for a reason that has nothing to do with immediate "personal" protection. "Earthing" (grounding) is directly connected with "personal" protection. I think that you will find that the Main Neutral conductor is connected to the Main Earth conductor AT THE SWITCHBOARD ("breakerbox" for you yanks or pommies) for the reason of impedance. Quite simply, you now rely on an earth/neutral "return" system. There are 2 current paths back to the supply transformer. These paths are intended to reduce the "impedance" back to the supply source & as such, allow OCPD's to trip quicker than if one return path existed.

By "equipotentially" bonding equipment to the earthing circuit, the chance of extraneous voltages on metallic cased equipment is reduced. Even though this is NOT intended to be a part of the "personal protection" earthing circuit, it does assist in the reduction of possible "personal" earth faults.

Equipotentential Bonding DOES NOT provide "personal" protection when it comes to earthing.
somewhere along the line, I lost track of this post. Now I come back and this yahoo posts some very wrong information. WOW.

I don't even know where to start with your hodge podge of mixing different systems, terms, and design purposes that throw so many diferent systems together that you are right, in a way but only because you have grouped multiple design purposes into one group so at least one of those systems and design purposes does do what you state but the rest have nothing to do with the original statement of purpose.

I even quoted what the NEC states about "earth grounding" yet you still want to argue the point. Oh well.

So, since you are so brilliant (yes, that is sarcastic), please provide mathmeatically, physically (not sure what the hell you mean with this statement), or chemically your (incorrect point) that the earth ground is intended as a return path for current to the transformer supply. I am not sure if you are really aware, but a current on the GEC is not desirable and in fact, efforts are made to remove it if there are such currents


Earth grounding and EGC are two seperate issues and they provide two distinct, but different benefits.
nap is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-22-2008, 11:27 AM   #24
nap
You talking to me?
 
nap's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: sw mi
Posts: 5,407
Default

Grounding VS Bonding


Quote:
Originally Posted by BillyD View Post
I use this as an example and not to imply that electricians are on the same intellectual level as doctors. .
don't make this incorrect assumption BillyD. I know many electricians that are as, or even more intelligent, than many doctors. Intelligence does not dictate the field we are in, it limits what field we can become competent in.

actually, one of my close friends has a PhD, used to be a college professor, used to own a civil engineering firm and is now limiting himself to being a farmer and an electrician.


It is just that doctors are trained in their specific field. Ask a doctor what an amp, volt, joule, impedance, and hysteresis are and most would have no idea. They are not trained in our field so you would not expect them to be familiar with them, just as an electrician would have difficulty following a conversation using medical terms or understanding the systems within our bodies. Doesn't mean either one of them is more intelligent than the other, nor less. All it means is each respective pro studied their field and not the other.
nap is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-22-2008, 12:14 PM   #25
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 149
Default

Grounding VS Bonding


You are right and I did not mean it in a general statement about any job or field. I just did not want elkangorito to think I was comparing him to a doctor. He missed the boat. I am sure he probably knows a lot about electricty and if he wants to help people that is good but don't try and talk down to them or over their heads. No offence to anyone.

BillyD is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Wire size for 300watt trans, 3 way 100ft Al the Diy guy Electrical 16 03-22-2008 08:46 PM
NEC Question Jafsvcs Electrical 1 06-13-2007 05:45 PM
advice on installing equipment grounding bar in main panel pacifier1er Electrical 5 05-29-2007 05:55 PM
Toggle switches: With or without grounding screw? Marekus Electrical 3 11-27-2006 03:48 PM
Which bonding method proper??? Nestor Electrical 2 09-15-2006 06:18 AM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.