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gone_fishing 01-04-2009 05:44 PM

Grounding using plastic boxes?
 
I am rewiring my gutted garage using the blue recepticle boxes. These do not have the ground like metal boxes. How do I ground the circuit?

Thanks!

InPhase277 01-04-2009 05:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by gone_fishing (Post 206937)
I am rewiring my gutted garage using the blue recepticle boxes. These do not have the ground like metal boxes. How do I ground the circuit?

Thanks!

With the bare ground wire inside the cable.

gone_fishing 01-04-2009 05:53 PM

So, just keep twisting the grounds together along the circuit?

joed 01-04-2009 06:05 PM

Yes and connect to the receptacles and switches. No connection to the box when plastic.

handifoot 01-04-2009 06:06 PM

The bare ground wire connects to any conductive material, like the metal yokes on the recepticals and switches with the green ground screw and runs back to the ground bar in the service panel and then, most likely to grounding rod(s). This is to protect any parts of equipment from becoming energized in the event of a short.

As the blue boxes are plastic, there is no need to ground them. Should you use any metal boxes, include them in the equipment grounding path with a pigtail to a ground screw within the box.

kbsparky 01-04-2009 06:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by gone_fishing (Post 206945)
So, just keep twisting the grounds together along the circuit?

To an extent, yes. But you still have to use a listed, pressure-type connector, such as a wire-nut, or crimp sleeve to be Code compliant.

And be sure to use a pigtail from those grounding crimps or wire-nuts to any green terminal on your switches or receptacles. :yes:

Stubbie 01-04-2009 07:08 PM

Quote:

The bare ground wire connects to any conductive material, like the metal yokes on the recepticals and switches with the green ground screw and runs back to the ground bar in the service panel and then, most likely to grounding rod(s). This is to protect any parts of equipment from becoming energized in the event of a short.
The effective ground fault path has nothing to do with ground rods or any other earthing electrode. The bonding of metal parts in a branch circuit to the EGFP is to clear ground faults and shorts as the fault current seeks its source. Ground rods are for lightning and other high voltage events.

handifoot 01-04-2009 07:40 PM

Sorry stubbie, you are the pro here.Just that it gets a little confusing to me as the bare ground wires and the white neutral wires are connected to bars that are bonded together which in turn are connected to the ground rods.

Stubbie 01-04-2009 08:00 PM

1 Attachment(s)
No problem handifoot. My point was only to clarify. System neutral current and fault current seeks the source.... the transformer center tap. It does not flow to the ground or earth via the grounding electode system. The neutrals and grounds are bonded at the neutral bar so that the current can utilize the service neutral to return to the source. I made a diagram to try and illustrate this.....

handifoot 01-04-2009 11:36 PM

Thanks Stubbie, I really appreciate the time you take to educate folks like me:clap:


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