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noquacks 01-06-2013 04:57 PM

Grounding ungrounded outlets
 
People,

Have a few 110v outlets, and only wires feeding them are 2 wire (hot/neutral). House was built in the 40's. I heard one can get grounding if you take a copper wire and connect the green ground screw on outlet to the metal box the receptacle is in. If the receptacle is nailed to wood stud, is this "grounding" of any usefulness at all? If so, how? If not, why?

Thanks!!

gregzoll 01-06-2013 05:34 PM

No, incorrect. Only if the wire feeding it is Armored with the bonding strap, or EMT, then you could use the outer sheath as the ground. Other way was running a ground wire to a cold water pipe, that would be bonded to Earth ground.

Jim Port 01-06-2013 05:45 PM

You cannot just run to a nearby metal water line. The connection can be in the panel where the circuit originates, or on the GEC if the cable does not have the bond strip.

Code05 01-06-2013 05:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jim Port (Post 1087796)
You cannot just run to a nearby metal water line. The connection can be in the panel where the circuit originates, or on the GEC if the cable does not have the bond strip.

True, but you could connect to the pipe at the 5' GEC connection.

Jim Port 01-06-2013 09:17 PM

I was using the tablet and don't have the cut and paste available. I thought within 5' was an option. Thanks.

JKeefe 01-06-2013 09:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by noquacks (Post 1087758)
I heard one can get grounding if you take a copper wire and connect the green ground screw on outlet to the metal box the receptacle is in. If the receptacle is nailed to wood stud, is this "grounding" of any usefulness at all? If so, how? If not, why?

It's not grounded because your studs don't conduct electricity. A functional ground connects the thing that needs to be grounded (in the case your outlet) via a conductive path to something that is the ground (either a wire in the ground or a water pipe). Modern wiring has a ground conductor in it, so an outlet becomes grounded when the electrical path flows outlet > grounding screw > grounding conductor > load center > ground. If you use the jacket of armored cable it can also function as the ground (although I have seen electricians on these boards says that the jacket can rust and become non-conductive over time). Either way there is a metal path from outlet to ground. If you just connect your outlet grounding screw to a wood stud, it doesn't do anything.

Carreiro 01-06-2013 09:34 PM

If you don't have ground you can change the outlet to a GFI.

joed 01-06-2013 09:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jim Port (Post 1087796)
You cannot just run to a nearby metal water line. The connection can be in the panel where the circuit originates, or on the GEC if the cable does not have the bond strip.

You can in Canada. I don't know where SE is but if it is in Canada you could ground to the water line.

noquacks 01-07-2013 12:55 PM

Thanks, people. I figured that was bogus info, to ground to steel box that is only nailed to wood. Sheesh. Now, whether Im in the SE, or Canada, or Africa, a good ground is a good ground, right?? (house is in S Cal, although, Im in the SE)

noquacks 01-07-2013 12:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Carreiro (Post 1087959)
If you don't have ground you can change the outlet to a GFI.

Good tip- guess its an option- to change over a bunch of outlets to GFI......better than smashing up plaster walls.....


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