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Old 06-03-2014, 11:33 AM   #1
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Grounding roof top antenna to CEE


I'm a bit confused about how to best ground a new rooftop TV antenna. It will be on a tripod at the peak of the roof and near the middle of the house.

I've seen it recommended to not run the antenna ground wire through the house but can't find that in the NEC. The ground wire is suppose to be tied to the building ground which is the CEE (concrete encased electrode, some call it the ufer). The CEE is in the basement of course, it is not outside, so there is no way to run the antenna ground wire to the CEE without bringing it into the house.

Shortest path would be to bring it right through the roof (through a ridge vent) straight down inside an interior wall (existing chase that a pvc vent pipe uses) to the basement and over to the CEE.

Is that ok? Or must I run it down the roof over the gutter down the wall and drill into the basement from the outside?

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Old 06-03-2014, 01:49 PM   #2
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Grounding roof top antenna to CEE


I don't know any thing about code for this but when that antenna gets hit by lightning I wouldn't want it running through my house.

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Old 06-03-2014, 01:51 PM   #3
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Grounding roof top antenna to CEE


The NEC does not cover the standards for Lightning Protection Systems (LPS), this is covered by NFPA 780: STANDARD FOR THE INSTALLATION OF LIGHTNING PROTECTION SYSTEMS[/I]

As unrealistic as it may seem it is not against this code to run the LPS conductor in the house. I would avoid tight bends and possible use nylon stand offs, those these are not required.

What size conductor are you thinking of using?
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Old 06-03-2014, 02:13 PM   #4
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Grounding roof top antenna to CEE


you might want to check out the ARRL (american radio relay league) antenna handbook.

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Old 06-03-2014, 02:16 PM   #5
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Grounding roof top antenna to CEE


I know it seems like your asking for trouble. But when it comes direct lightning strikes, not a whole lot of options. There is going to be damage with a direct hit.

So the idea is to reduce the damage as much as possible.

By connecting your antenna to main ground you give the lightning an optional path that hopefully will not damage the house and occupants. Without that path you run the risk that it will find a more direct path to your electronics and could also damage your structure.

No mater what, if you take a direct hit, your going to have issues. This is about reducing those issues.
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Old 06-03-2014, 02:23 PM   #6
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Grounding roof top antenna to CEE


Do you have internet or telephone ? If yes, where are they bonded? Seems there would be an intersystem bonding point where they are connected. You can connect to that.

If none of these are available, you can run it inside.
  • Building or structure grounding electrode system [250.50].
  • Interior metal water piping system, within 5 ft from its point of entrance [250.52(A)(1)].
  • Accessible means external to the building, as covered in 250.94.
  • Metallic service raceway.
  • Service equipment enclosure.
  • Grounding electrode conductor or the grounding electrode conductor metal enclosure.
All this is in article 810 specifically, 810.21
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Old 06-03-2014, 03:00 PM   #7
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Grounding roof top antenna to CEE


I am just trying to follow code and I know that NEC requires grounding of the antenna. I don't know if the NEC requirement is really intended to handle lightning strikes. I'm not trying to set up lightning protection unless that is the point of the code. If so, then my system should be adequate if I follow the NEC requirements.

I still can't find anything in the NEC as to whether it is ok or not to run the NEC required antenna ground wire through the house or whether it should be outside. Being that all new construction has CEEs that seem to always be in the basement it is hard to see how one can keep the antenna ground wire outside the house and still connect to the CEE.

I will use whatever wire size the NEC says. I don't have the NEC in front of me here but I had found that and seem to recall seeing 6 copper. I will also try to look at ARRL and hopefully it won't conflict with NEC as the NEC should address this very common residential system. This isn't some custom radio tower. It's just a residential TV antenna on the roof of a residence.

I appreciate all your input. If anyone finds anything in the NEC with regards to locating this ground wire please let me know.
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Old 06-03-2014, 03:13 PM   #8
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Grounding roof top antenna to CEE


Thanks wirenut. I will look at 810.21 again. I live in the country so no wired internet. I do have phone so I'll check to see if that is grounded to an outside rod. "structure grounding electrode" is the CEE right? Water lines are all plastic, no metal raceways, service equipment enclosure is right next to CEE, and grounding electrode conductors are all in the house and tied to CEE.

So if the phone is connected to an exterior ground rod I can just connect to that and not by continous wire to CEE? Both the CEE and rod should be connected to each other right?

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Originally Posted by wirenut1110 View Post
Do you have internet or telephone ? If yes, where are they bonded? Seems there would be an intersystem bonding point where they are connected. You can connect to that.

If none of these are available, you can run it inside.
  • Building or structure grounding electrode system [250.50].
  • Interior metal water piping system, within 5 ft from its point of entrance [250.52(A)(1)].
  • Accessible means external to the building, as covered in 250.94.
  • Metallic service raceway.
  • Service equipment enclosure.
  • Grounding electrode conductor or the grounding electrode conductor metal enclosure.
All this is in article 810 specifically, 810.21
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Old 06-03-2014, 03:18 PM   #9
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Grounding roof top antenna to CEE


You can put a ground rod outside for the antenna and other communication lines going into the structure. As long as it is bonded to the Ufer. As for running the ground wire through the structure. Look at how Lightning protection is installed. It connects inside the attic space, then from there it bonds to a ground rod outside the structure. The whole time the grounding wire runs inside a wall.

Personally if you have the headroom in the Attic. I would place the antenna in there and then you do not need the Ground protection, along with a Gas Discharge tube on the line at the static block. L-Com.com sells the Lightning protection that would be needed to protect anything downstream from static or direct strike.
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Old 06-03-2014, 03:37 PM   #10
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Grounding roof top antenna to CEE


Quote:
Originally Posted by Know A Little View Post
The NEC does not cover the standards for Lightning Protection Systems (LPS), this is covered by NFPA 780: STANDARD FOR THE INSTALLATION OF LIGHTNING PROTECTION SYSTEMS[/I]

As unrealistic as it may seem it is not against this code to run the LPS conductor in the house. I would avoid tight bends and possible use nylon stand offs, those these are not required.

What size conductor are you thinking of using?
NFPA 780 has nothing to do with home Antenna/Communication systems. Lightning protection requirement in NFPA 780. Was removed as of the 1997 edition. Due to the NEC covers it under 810.21.
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Old 06-03-2014, 04:37 PM   #11
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Grounding roof top antenna to CEE


Yea, just make a good clamp connection at antenna, run big braided copper wire along perimeter (no sharp bends), shortest path, and most important reconfigure you ground rod system. I personally set 3 in a triangular pattern 6 ft apart driven 20ft deep and bond the 3 accordingly

thats about it
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Old 06-03-2014, 05:08 PM   #12
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Grounding roof top antenna to CEE


http://ecmweb.com/code-basics/articl...sion-equipment
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Old 06-03-2014, 05:09 PM   #13
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Grounding roof top antenna to CEE


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Yea, just make a good clamp connection at antenna, run big braided copper wire along perimeter (no sharp bends), shortest path, and most important reconfigure you ground rod system. I personally set 3 in a triangular pattern 6 ft apart driven 20ft deep and bond the 3 accordingly

thats about it
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Old 06-03-2014, 05:38 PM   #14
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http://www.reeve.com/Documents/Artic...ents_Reeve.pdf
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Old 06-03-2014, 05:51 PM   #15
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Grounding roof top antenna to CEE


Quote:
Originally Posted by gregzoll View Post
NFPA 780 has nothing to do with home Antenna/Communication systems. Lightning protection requirement in NFPA 780. Was removed as of the 1997 edition. Due to the NEC covers it under 810.21.
The question was can he run the down wire associated with a possible lighting hit to his antenna, The down conductors for an LPS are commonly run through a house how is this any different. Very common with existing LPS systems for new antennas or dishes to be connected to the LPS system.

Believe me a lightning strike could care less if this is an antenna, a Franklin Rod or the corner of his house when the item takes a direct strike.

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