Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Electrical

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 10-14-2010, 06:23 PM   #1
Newbie
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 21
Rewards Points: 0
Share |
Default

Grounding Question


I just replaced my 100amp 20 slot panel with a 100amp 30 slot panel and I have a question about the grounding. I also have a disconnect fuse\panel in the basement about 3ft from the meter and then the main panel is about 10' from there. The only current ground I have is an 8awg wire attached to my copper pipe and to the ground screw on the disconnect. I have read that if I have a copper pipe buried at least 10 ft out, my ground needs to be attached to the main pipe within 5' of it coming into the basement.

If this is the case, does it need to be grounded to the disconnect or the main 100amp panel?

Also, does the ground and the neutral need to be separated at the main breaker panel because of the disconnect?

Oh, one last question. Do I have to have the grounding rod as well as the copper pipe ground? If so, where is this one grounded to?

Thank, Scott...

smuth10 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-14-2010, 08:06 PM   #2
I=E/R
 
a7ecorsair's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 2,052
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Grounding Question


How does the power get from the meter to your new panel? Do the wires from the meter go the disconnect/fuse box you mentioned first and then to the panel?

a7ecorsair is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-14-2010, 08:13 PM   #3
Newbie
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 21
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Grounding Question


Yes, they do
smuth10 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-14-2010, 09:45 PM   #4
I=E/R
 
a7ecorsair's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 2,052
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Grounding Question


Quote:
Originally Posted by smuth10 View Post
I just replaced my 100amp 20 slot panel with a 100amp 30 slot panel and I have a question about the grounding. I also have a disconnect fuse\panel in the basement about 3ft from the meter and then the main panel is about 10' from there. The only current ground I have is an 8awg wire attached to my copper pipe and to the ground screw on the disconnect. I have read that if I have a copper pipe buried at least 10 ft out, my ground needs to be attached to the main pipe within 5' of it coming into the basement.

If this is the case, does it need to be grounded to the disconnect or the main 100amp panel?

Also, does the ground and the neutral need to be separated at the main breaker panel because of the disconnect?

Oh, one last question. Do I have to have the grounding rod as well as the copper pipe ground? If so, where is this one grounded to?

Thank, Scott...
In your disconnect you should have the ground wire connected to the same bus bar as the neutral from the meter. You should then have four wires going to your 100 amp panel - 2 hots, a neutral, and a ground. In your 100 amp panel the neutral and the ground bus are not connected.
a7ecorsair is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-15-2010, 10:18 AM   #5
Newbie
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 21
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Grounding Question


I can run a ground from the disconnect to the main panel without a problem, but with the way the wires were run to the main panel, there is no way I would be able to separate the ground and neutral. What is the downfall of not having it connected this way? Is there another work around to have this setup so that there is no real danger?
smuth10 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-16-2010, 07:46 AM   #6
I=E/R
 
a7ecorsair's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 2,052
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Grounding Question


Quote:
there is no way I would be able to separate the ground and neutral
Why can't you separate the two bus bars? You may have to extend some of the wires but as long as only one white wire is under a screw on the neutral bar you will be ok. You can put two ground wires under a screw on the ground bar.
What type of wire runs from the disconnect to this panel and what size? Is it copper or aluminum?
a7ecorsair is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-16-2010, 08:18 AM   #7
Newbie
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 21
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Grounding Question


I have plenty of room on the two bars, I just didn't think it was kosher to wire nut extensions inside of the box to run the wires around to the other bar. I will do this as soon as I have a chance. The wire from the disconnect to the main panel is new 2awg alum. 3 wires, the two hots and the common.

I am thinking of running two new grounding rods outside and grounding these to the disconnect and then running a separate ground for the main panel to the copper pipe coming in the basement. I figure two grounds are better than one
smuth10 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-16-2010, 11:40 AM   #8
Licensed electrician
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Maryland
Posts: 7,593
Rewards Points: 20
Default

Grounding Question


As was already stated the feeder to the panel from the disconnect needs to be 4 wires, not 3 like you have.

The ground for the panel comes from the disconnect, not a water pipe.
__________________
Answers based on the National Electrical Code. Local amendments may apply. Check with your local building officials.
Jim Port is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-16-2010, 04:16 PM   #9
Newbie
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 21
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Grounding Question


Alrighty then. Thank you!
smuth10 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-2013, 11:42 PM   #10
Newbie
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Huntsville, AL
Posts: 25
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Grounding Question


So Jim, what you're saying is that from the sub-panel back to the disconnect you need four wires (two hot legs, a neutral, and a ground) but at the disconnect the neutral and the ground can come together? I think what I'm hearing is that between the main panel and the disconnect three wire is ok (two hot and a neutral) but from the disconnect to the sub-panel the ground and the neutral must be separate? Can you explain why this is how it must be?
Keegans is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-14-2013, 05:49 AM   #11
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Virginia
Posts: 452
Rewards Points: 2
Default

Grounding Question


Quote:
Originally Posted by smuth10 View Post
I can run a ground from the disconnect to the main panel without a problem, but with the way the wires were run to the main panel, there is no way I would be able to separate the ground and neutral. What is the downfall of not having it connected this way? Is there another work around to have this setup so that there is no real danger?

You cannot just "run" a ground wire, you must replace the existing cable with a properly sized 4-conductor cable.

In addition you need to verify the neutral/ground bar in the subpanel which will become the neutral bar is not bonded (grounded) to the back box.

Know A Little is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Grounding a Square Box <--newbie question dgates12 Electrical 20 01-06-2010 06:02 PM
Basement Renovation Question KUIPORNG Remodeling 234 08-26-2008 08:19 AM
Anyone want to take a shot at why #6 to attach antenna ground to breaker? Piedmont Electrical 44 01-08-2008 04:11 PM
grounding to water pipe question eastvantrading Electrical 6 12-20-2006 09:49 AM
Question on Grounding ayudi General DIY Discussions 2 12-11-2006 04:14 AM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.