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Old 07-15-2011, 07:20 PM   #1
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Ground Fault protection


As I understand it, one GFCI receptical will protect an entire circuit, as long as its placed first in line coming out of the box. Is this correct? My wife (who's actually pretty sharp about these things), says any recepticle within 3 feet of a water source needs to be GFCI, regardless of whether there's another GFCI breaker on the circuit. Who's right?

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Old 07-15-2011, 07:24 PM   #2
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Ground Fault protection


Don't know where she is getting the 3' from, but a gfci breaker protects the entire circuit.

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Old 07-15-2011, 07:40 PM   #3
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Ground Fault protection


A gfi receptacle can protect anything downstream if the LOAD terminals are used.
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Old 07-15-2011, 09:07 PM   #4
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Ground Fault protection


There is never a requirement that any specific receptacle *be* a GFCI receptacle, only that it be GFCI *protected*. Using an upstream GFCI receptacle or a GFCI circuit breaker is always allowed.
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Old 07-15-2011, 10:43 PM   #5
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Ground Fault protection


Mpoulton is right. The ONLY benefit of a 'local' GFCI rec, is that it is easy to identify when it trips and to reset it.
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Old 07-16-2011, 12:37 AM   #6
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Ground Fault protection


There's that "water source" myth again.

There has never been a "water source" GFI requirement. I have no idea how this myth ever got started.
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Old 07-16-2011, 08:47 AM   #7
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Ground Fault protection


While most areas that require GFCI protection are not related to distance from a water source, there 2 2008 code sections that mention distance from a sink. 210.8(A)(7) Laundry, utility, wet bar sinks, and 210.8(B)(5) Sinks [other than dwelling units]. Both sections list within 6 ft of the edge of the sink (not 3 feet).

No circuit that is already protected by a GFCI breaker will require an additional GFCI receptacle.
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Old 07-16-2011, 12:22 PM   #8
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Ground Fault protection


I appreciate everyone's help.
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Old 07-16-2011, 09:05 PM   #9
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Ground Fault protection


actually .. one thing to be a nit-pickler.. the GFI will not protect the "entire network" .. actually, it is listed how many items it will protect. how many recepticals and how many loads (lights, fans, etc.).. who knows.. maybe your house wiring is crazy and you have tonnes of stuff of of one "network" well in excess of code due to shotty work done long before you moved in.

one big difference between a GFCI receptical protecting a "network" and a GFCI breaker doing the same is cost. it is MUCH cheaper to get a GFCI receptical.

also note that there may be some issues with trying to protect sleeping dwellings with a GFCI (not sure why you would want to.. but i mention it here anyway). because these rooms must be arc fault protected. i don't know if it can ALSO be GFCI protected?

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Old 07-21-2011, 10:54 PM   #10
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Ground Fault protection


Thanks, Knuck. We're running completely new circuits, got the wall torn down to the studs and all the old electric demoed, so won't overload.

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