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Old 03-06-2009, 09:17 AM   #1
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Green Goo


I noticed that on my wall outlets in the kitchen when I removed the pluged in appliance there was some green goo on the wall outlet and also on the appliance plug. Can someone tell where it might be coming from and what I can do to prevent it from coming back. I cleaned it off before. However I am not a rockect scientist but I am thinking liquids and electricty mix.

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Old 03-06-2009, 09:56 AM   #2
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Green Goo


Could it be the pulling lube used by an electrician.
How old are the wiring and outlets?

I answered this question before on a different forum. The source is no longer available, however.

"In the manufacture of electric cables, they use plastic in the cable covers to make them flexible and easier to handle," explained Peter Lamond, the Electrical Safety Officer with the Department of Industrial Relations.

"The release of this green slimy substance comes from this plastic and tends to be set off by high ambient temperatures like those found in hotter climates, like in Queensland, and also in hot places like in walls and ceiling cavities."

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Old 03-06-2009, 11:17 AM   #3
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Green Goo


How old is the wiring and receptacle?
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Old 03-06-2009, 11:38 AM   #4
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Green Goo


Moisture and the copper wiring will result in green oxidation too- as well as lube and copper ox.
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Old 03-06-2009, 12:13 PM   #5
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Green Goo


I think the house is about 40+/- years old. It does have copper wiring. Our toaster oven and coffee pot are pluged in here. This is also next to the kitchen sink. As far as how old is the receptacle? I am not sure if we had changed this one out or not. If we did I dont recall why we would of other then it may have been broken. We reside in Southaven, MS.
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Old 03-06-2009, 01:49 PM   #6
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Green Goo


Are you able to test for power, shut off the circuit, and check the inside of the box?
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Old 03-06-2009, 02:05 PM   #7
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Green Goo


Oh it works alright. There must be power. I mean since we use these for the coffee pot and toaster oven on a daily bases. I just happen to be doing some abnormal deep cleaning and decided to move and clean under them. When I went to unplug them that is when I noticed the Green Goo.
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Old 03-06-2009, 06:34 PM   #8
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Green Goo


Replace the receptacle. I have seen this green goo in an old switch that became corroded. It was actually starting to fail when I saw the goo. I don't know why it was goo, and not just oxidation, but probably somewhere during its life something got into the receptacle.

You said you have a coffee pot and a toaster oven plugged into the receptacle.
That's a heavy draw. I hope the circuit is 20A, #12 wire.
Perhaps when you replace the receptacle, spend the extra money and get a heavy-duty like Hubbel, or at least an industrial Leviton. The Leviton is about $6 at Home Depot. I think the Hubbel is even more, but you won't ever have to replace it again if you install the Hubbel!
Another good name is Bryant.

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Old 03-06-2009, 07:12 PM   #9
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Green Goo


Residue from dishwashing soap? (Do you use Palmolive?)
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Old 03-06-2009, 07:15 PM   #10
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Green Goo


I recently ran into some green goo on a bunch of white wires.

It was wet and the wiring was about 45 years old. Someone told me that it was some kind of chemical reaction in a certain type of insulation. It was only on the white wires.

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Old 03-06-2009, 07:17 PM   #11
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Green Goo


Those wires are all cut! You let all the goo out!!
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Old 03-07-2009, 07:18 AM   #12
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Green Goo


My understanding is that the "green goo" is the platisizer used in the insulation.
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Old 03-07-2009, 07:43 AM   #13
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Green Goo


This was posted on another site:

Quote:
<H1 class=h1eso>Green slime from older electric cables
Quote:

Green exudate seeping from PVC

Issued 4/1996
Reissued 11/2005 and 11/2006

The Electrical Safety Office has investigated the possible safety issues of a green oily substance exuded by some thermoplastic insulated and sheathed cables. The results were that:
  • The affected cables are V60 and V75 type PVC insulated and sheathed cables.
  • The substance is a plasticiser used in the manufacture of the cable.
  • The release of the substance is initiated and exacerbated by high ambient temperatures such as can be found in ceiling spaces and in hotter climates.
  • The substance is not conductive and therefore not liable to electrical tracking.
  • The presence of the substance will not alter the flame propagation characteristics of the cable.
  • The presence of the substance does not necessitate replacement of the cable.
  • Cables should be assessed for replacement only when insulation tests reveal failure or when cracking of the insulation becomes apparent.
  • The green exudate is mildly toxic and can cause burning and irritation, especially to mucous membranes such as in the eyes, nose and mouth.
  • There has been no epidemiological link established with cancer in humans.
  • The substance is not water soluble and should be removed from hands using an oil solvent type of cleanser. Methylated spirits is a suitable solvent for cleaning the substance from switch plates etc. Caution: do not use excessive amounts of methylated spirits as it could create a fire hazard. Power to any electrical equipment and sockets must be turned off at the switchboard, and the methylated spirits should be applied using a dampened cloth.
  • In some cases, such as behind light switches or socket outlets, the amount of exudate can be reduced by forming a drip loop in the cables below the terminal. This must be carried out by a licensed electrical worker only.
Last updated October 31, 2006
</H1>

http://www.deir.qld.gov.au/electrica...lime/index.htm
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Last edited by Bocolo; 03-07-2009 at 07:50 AM.
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Old 03-07-2009, 01:09 PM   #14
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Green Goo


Hmm...I remember working on 1950s bx...it had a green/blue residue in the splices and nuts. That stuff has a distinctive smell...usually when I crack the boxes open.

This was in a room with three furnaces...so the ambient temp. was at a good 75-85F.

Last edited by rgsgww; 03-07-2009 at 01:11 PM.
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Old 03-07-2009, 01:33 PM   #15
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Green Goo


I have seen this a few years ago on an indoor power bar and also a multi plug splitter. Looked a bit like Palmolive but did not seem to have an adverse effect. However it seemed to ooze from inside.

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