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jamiedolan 12-14-2008 04:35 PM

Great stuff around boxes?
 
From an electrical standpoint is there any reason not to use Great Stuff around plastic electrical boxes?

The generic version of great stuff says you can use it around electrical boxes,but the brand name does not.

Any reason not to use it around boxes and romex?

Thanks
Jamie

J. V. 12-15-2008 01:30 PM

I cannot see any problem with Great Stuff, except for the mess. Now, you cannot use it for a fire rated wall in place of fire caulk.

handyman78 12-15-2008 02:07 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by J. V. (Post 198322)
I cannot see any problem with Great Stuff, except for the mess. Now, you cannot use it for a fire rated wall in place of fire caulk.

However- there is now fire rated Great Stuff, slightly more expensive but would compensate for the rating need. It is a darker orange in color.

Termite 12-15-2008 02:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by handyman78 (Post 198340)
However- there is now fire rated Great Stuff, slightly more expensive but would compensate for the rating need. It is a darker orange in color.

No, the orange fire foam is for firestopping and draftstopping...That is a totally different animal than fire assemblies, ratings, and fire separations. Orange fire foam is not a suitable replacement for intumescent putty pads or other listed measures to prevent fire and heat passage through a penetration of a rated assembly. Orange fire foam's listing allows its use in firestopping as required in IRC 602.8 within its listed limitations, but it is not accepted or listed for addressing penetrations in rated walls, floors, and ceilings.

In single family nonrated construction, I see no reason why great stuff or similar expansive foams cannot be used around electrical boxes. If the foam is applied in the box, that would be a code violation. Placement of foam in contact with certain can lights would be an issue as well.

jamiedolan 12-15-2008 03:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by thekctermite (Post 198344)
No, the orange fire foam is for firestopping and draftstopping...That is a totally different animal than fire assemblies, ratings, and fire separations. Orange fire foam is not a suitable replacement for intumescent putty pads or other listed measures to prevent fire and heat passage through a penetration of a rated assembly. Orange fire foam's listing allows its use in firestopping as required in IRC 602.8 within its listed limitations, but it is not accepted or listed for addressing penetrations in rated walls, floors, and ceilings.

In single family nonrated construction, I see no reason why great stuff or similar expansive foams cannot be used around electrical boxes. If the foam is applied in the box, that would be a code violation. Placement of foam in contact with certain can lights would be an issue as well.

Thanks. I just wanted to get it around the outside of a few boxes in the 1/4 plywood wall between my house and garage. Someday perhaps we will get the garage upgraded to rock so it is meets todays code as a fire stop, but for now it is going to stay the way it's been since 63, and I am just going to foam up around the boxes while I have the wall open on the inside of the house garage wall.

I haven't researched it much, but it's my understanding that now when homes are built there are a number of fire stop measures put into place, but back in 63', I don't think they barely did a thing in terms of fire stops.

Jamie

Thanks
Jamie

Termite 12-15-2008 03:58 PM

Jamie, you're correct about fire-resistive measures in the garage nowadays. The common walls and ceilings must be rocked, as well as any structural supports such as exterior walls, headers, steel beams and posts.

What you're doing is fine, and if it prevents air/smoke/flammable gas movement between the house and the garage it is a safer situation than you had before!

jamiedolan 12-15-2008 04:07 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by thekctermite (Post 198385)
Jamie, you're correct about fire-resistive measures in the garage nowadays. The common walls and ceilings must be rocked, as well as any structural supports such as exterior walls, headers, steel beams and posts.

What you're doing is fine, and if it prevents air/smoke/flammable gas movement between the house and the garage it is a safer situation than you had before!

I am putting up some 4mil plastic on the inside as a vapor barrier as well. I used kraft faced, but it seems like the plastic offers a little better seal.

Maybe someday I will get to rocking the garage, I was just thinking about it and I bet it would be over 30 sheets of 10' rock. Plus I'd have to work around my shelves I built in or uninstall them. What a ton of work.

Thanks
Jamie


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