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Old 08-17-2012, 04:34 PM   #1
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GFI's in the Kitchen


How far apart the GFI outlets should be on a Kitchen back splash ? I was told that every 0.9m there should be a power outlets; Is this statement correct ? I'm in Ontario, Canada

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Last edited by lawrence2012; 08-17-2012 at 05:07 PM. Reason: include the location
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Old 08-17-2012, 04:35 PM   #2
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GFI's in the Kitchen


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Originally Posted by lawrence2012 View Post
How far apart the GFI outlets should be on a Kitchen back splash ? I was told that every 0.9m there should be a power outlets; Is this statement correct ?

Thank you
Where are you located?

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Old 08-17-2012, 04:43 PM   #3
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GFI's in the Kitchen


In Ontario, Canada
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Old 08-17-2012, 09:06 PM   #4
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GFI's in the Kitchen


no receptacle can be further than 900mm from the next receptacle following the wall line.
gfci protection not required for microwave plug if it's built in, this has to be a dedicated ciruit if it's a built in microwave.
anything in a 1.5m radius of the sink needs gfci protection
either a 15a two pole gfci breaker can be used as a split receptacle or a 20A gfci circuit.
only two small appliance plugs are allowed per circuit on the countertop and you need to run at least two circuits. some exceptions exist.
any workspace greater than 300mm as measured across the back of the counter requires a receptacle.(ie 350mm countertop between sink and stove requires receptacle)
fridge requires dedicated circuit, does not have to be gfci protected if in the gfci zone. this can also run a clock(single receptacle not duplex)
If you have an eat in area in the kitchen you need a receptacle of the tamper proof variety in the eat in area.cannot be on with kitchen appliance circuits
any penisula or l shape standing off the wall greater than 300mm by 600mm requires a receptacle
same rule applies for an island. gfci protection needed if penisula and island receptacle fall in the gfci zone.
appliance circuits must be leap frogged so that no two receptacles adjacent to each other are fed from the same circuit.
range outlet can't be higher than 130mm to the center of the box and the ground must be positioned either to the left or to the right. box must be secured on two sides and located as close to the center of the appliance location as posible.
no plug can be mounted on any work surfaces facing up under any circumstances.


good luck!!!!!
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Old 08-18-2012, 12:17 PM   #5
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GFI's in the Kitchen


Is it 900mm receptacle to receptacle or no counter space shall be more than 900 mm from receptacle making it 1.8m between receptacles?
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Old 08-18-2012, 01:24 PM   #6
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in dwelling units there shall be installed in each kitchen (i) one receptacle for each refrigerator; (ii) (iii) (iv) (v) (vi) where a gas supply piping or a gas connection outlet has been provided for a free-standing gas range, one receptacle behind the intended gas range location not more than 130mm from the floor and as near midpoint as is practicable, measured along the floor line of the wall space intended for the gas range; a sufficient number of receptacles (5-15R split or 5-20R) along the wall at counter work surfaces (excluding sinks, built-in equipment, and isolated work surfaces less than 300 mm long at the wall line) so that no point along the wall line is more than 900 mm from a receptacle measured horizontally along the wall line; at least one receptacle (5-15R split or 5-20R) installed at each permanently fixed island counter space with a continuous long dimension of 600 mm or greater and a short dimension of 300 mm or greater; at least one receptacle (5-15R split or 5-20R) installed at each peninsular counter space with a continuous long dimension of 600 mm or greater and a short dimension of 300 mm or greater; and at least one duplex receptacle in a dining area forming part of a kitchen; the receptacles specified in Item (d) shall not be located (i) on the area of the wall directly behind the kitchen sink; or (ii) on the area of the counter directly in front of the kitchen sink.

900mm between recptacles.
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Old 08-19-2012, 09:41 PM   #7
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You are wrong in your interpretation.

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no point along the wall line is more than 900 mm from a receptacle measured horizontally along the wall line
No point along the wall more than 900 mm. That means you can put the receptacles 1.8m(1800mm) apart and if you put your rule in the center either direction is 900mm away from a receptacle. You do need a receptacle within 900m of the end of the counter.
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Last edited by joed; 08-19-2012 at 09:43 PM.
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Old 08-19-2012, 09:57 PM   #8
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I stand corrected, thanks. Although I think the 300mm rule plays more often than that one. Not often is there ever 6 feet of open counter space without a sink or appliance to break up the workspace.
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Old 08-20-2012, 10:40 AM   #9
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If this is going to be *your* kitchen, I would recommend "pretend placing" various appliances where they are going to be located. Then also pretend you are using hand held appliances like a mixer or others like a waffle iron. Where would you plug those in? Can opener, etc.?

You may find you need 2 things always plugged in at one location and you would not be able to plug in a hand mixer in that area without unplugging something. In that case install 4 outlets at that location!

In my kitchen I find that things are concentrated in certain areas and 3 or 4 outlets are needed for things which are always plugged in. In one case 6 outlets would be a good idea in a specific area.

So do install the minimum required, but it may be a good idea to install extra outlets in some areas.

And another "thinking ahead" idea... If there is an easily accessible attic above the kitchen, run the wires from each outlet up to junction boxes there. Then if you add some "power hog" appliance in the future, you could easily place a specific outlet on its own circuit in the future.

For example I am not happy with the consumer deep fryers. They take forever to warm up. Restaurant countertop models are 240 volts and I assume they would heat up quicker? But that would take some rewiring.
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Old 08-20-2012, 11:48 AM   #10
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OK .what am I missing? I believe that in Ontario..all kitchen duplex receptacles must be dual dedicated circuits, i.e., each half of the receptacle must have and independent feed from it's own panel breaker. Also, do all of the receptacles have to be GFCI's? I'll be upgrading all of the wiring in a house we are moving into in November, including the kitchen. House has new 100Amp Panel and is open ceiling in the basement so, shouldn't be difficult just a bit of perserverence and good old manual labour. Redoing the "galley" kitchen layout as well. Will run all the wirning then get electrical contractor to complete and have it inspected.
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Old 08-20-2012, 01:47 PM   #11
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GFI's in the Kitchen


Split receptacles went out the window with the new gfci rules. Your allowed a maximum of two receptacles per circuit. These receptacles cannot be adjacent to each other. Anything within 1.5m of the sink has to be either a gfci two pole breaker for 15a split receptacle or a 20 gfci single circuit. You can not have anything else on the same circuit as the countertop receptacles.

If your redoing your house I suggest dropping into home depot and buying the p.s. knight yellow book for 20 bucks. It has full page diagrams on kitchen wiring and pretty much everything else residential as well.
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Last edited by andrew79; 08-20-2012 at 01:50 PM.
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Old 08-20-2012, 04:35 PM   #12
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Thanks Andrew..good name ..my oldest son's name is Andrew and he happens to be an electrician!..but, he's more involved with industrial and he's up in Fort Mac Murray. I will definitely buy the book..You CAN teach an old dog new tricks.. thanks again Techpappy..Industrial Boiler Tech and Commercial Building Mechanical Inspector (retired)
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Old 08-20-2012, 07:23 PM   #13
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GFI's in the Kitchen


There are two options for kitchen receptacles in Ontario. They can be 15amp split wired or they can be 20 amp T slots. The 20 amp option was added when the GFCI requirement was added. This allowed use of GFCI receptacles instead of the GFCI breaker needed for the split wired receptacles.
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Old 08-20-2012, 09:44 PM   #14
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Originally Posted by techpappy
Thanks Andrew..good name ..my oldest son's name is Andrew and he happens to be an electrician!..but, he's more involved with industrial and he's up in Fort Mac Murray. I will definitely buy the book..You CAN teach an old dog new tricks.. thanks again Techpappy..Industrial Boiler Tech and Commercial Building Mechanical Inspector (retired)
I do mostly industrial as well, some commercial, hence the fact I messed up the answer for the countertop spacing. I have to actually look up the resi stuff, don't use it much

Good money to be made up there right now. Best of luck with your reno.

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