Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Electrical

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 02-04-2009, 02:26 PM   #16
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: New Jersey, USA
Posts: 1,202
Share |
Default

GFCI trip form fridge


Actually, it is not recommended to place refrigerators or freezers on a GFCI.
Not sure what you do if one is located in an unfinished basement, where GFCI is required for all receptacles.
I think I would probably go with the GFCI, and a power-failure alarm that is loud enough to hear from upstairs.

FW

__________________

KE2KB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-04-2009, 03:25 PM   #17
DIY'er
 
jamiedolan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Neenah, Wisconsin, USA
Posts: 2,032
Blog Entries: 2
Default

GFCI trip form fridge


Quote:
Originally Posted by Stubbie View Post
So your splitting the multiwire and not sharing the neutrl after the JB??
Right now, it is a single circuit, sitting on a double pole breaker, with nothing but a wire nut on the wire that runs from the other pole on the breaker.

I am sorry I didn't explain it well. The plan is to use the other leg of the multiwire elsewhere via the jbox, but for now, the hot is capped and I have not cut and pig tailed the neutral yet.

The fridge outlet right now is 12awg thhn red via conduit direct run to panel via emt, and 1 white neutral via the same conduit. The THHN comes into the 4x4 that this GFCI is in and is pigtailed to this GFCI, and to a piece of romex that feeds 1 other outlet and a outside light. The outside light and other outlet worked fine prior to pluging in the fridge.

There is nothing on the load side of the outlet, and the hot and neutral are deffiatly connected in the proper places.


Jamie
__________________
Jamie Dolan - Neenah, WI
Jamie Dolan Paw Dogs
Need Help Uploading Photos? Click here.
jamiedolan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-04-2009, 03:26 PM   #18
DIY'er
 
jamiedolan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Neenah, Wisconsin, USA
Posts: 2,032
Blog Entries: 2
Default

GFCI trip form fridge


Quote:
Originally Posted by KE2KB View Post
Actually, it is not recommended to place refrigerators or freezers on a GFCI.
Not sure what you do if one is located in an unfinished basement, where GFCI is required for all receptacles.
I think I would probably go with the GFCI, and a power-failure alarm that is loud enough to hear from upstairs.

FW
Unfinished basement. May have to use a dedicated appliance outlet for it. Jamie
__________________
Jamie Dolan - Neenah, WI
Jamie Dolan Paw Dogs
Need Help Uploading Photos? Click here.
jamiedolan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-04-2009, 03:29 PM   #19
DIY'er
 
jamiedolan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Neenah, Wisconsin, USA
Posts: 2,032
Blog Entries: 2
Default

GFCI trip form fridge


The fridge ran for quite a while over night and I assume into the day today. It triped the P&S GFCI sometime today, the fridge is still kind of cold, so I don't think it was too long ago.

The P&S is brand new. I found the date on the fridge, it was made in 01/ 1998. 11 years old...

Should I just forget it, install a dedicated outlet and move on? I just put a 1/2" setoff via a KO to a handy box and install a single plug unless anyone has any better ideas...

Thanks for all the help.

Jamie
__________________
Jamie Dolan - Neenah, WI
Jamie Dolan Paw Dogs
Need Help Uploading Photos? Click here.
jamiedolan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-04-2009, 03:40 PM   #20
DIYer
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Virginia
Posts: 910
Default

GFCI trip form fridge


Quote:
Originally Posted by KE2KB View Post
Actually, it is not recommended to place refrigerators or freezers on a GFCI.
Not sure what you do if one is located in an unfinished basement, where GFCI is required for all receptacles.
What I did was put the freezer on the first outlet in the circuit, unprotected by a GFCI, and made that a single non-duplex outlet. Then the circuit continued on to a GFCI and all the rest downstream were GFCI protected.

This way only the freezer outlet was without GFCI protection but I also didn't need a fully dedicated circuit. Worked for me.
Gigs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-04-2009, 06:31 PM   #21
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: New Jersey, USA
Posts: 1,202
Default

GFCI trip form fridge


Quote:
Originally Posted by Gigs View Post
What I did was put the freezer on the first outlet in the circuit, unprotected by a GFCI, and made that a single non-duplex outlet. Then the circuit continued on to a GFCI and all the rest downstream were GFCI protected.

This way only the freezer outlet was without GFCI protection but I also didn't need a fully dedicated circuit. Worked for me.
Sorry about that. I forgot about the exception for the single appliance receptacle.
That's what I'm going to need if the washer trips the GFCI I am going to install in the next few days.
I'll have to install two single receptacles, one for the washer, the other for the dryer. Can't use a duplex, because of the plugs on both appliances come out facing down.

If I do that, can I put both single receptacles on the same 20A branch?

FW
__________________

KE2KB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-04-2009, 06:32 PM   #22
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: New Jersey, USA
Posts: 1,202
Default

GFCI trip form fridge


Quote:
Originally Posted by jamiedolan View Post
The fridge ran for quite a while over night and I assume into the day today. It triped the P&S GFCI sometime today, the fridge is still kind of cold, so I don't think it was too long ago.

The P&S is brand new. I found the date on the fridge, it was made in 01/ 1998. 11 years old...

Should I just forget it, install a dedicated outlet and move on? I just put a 1/2" setoff via a KO to a handy box and install a single plug unless anyone has any better ideas...

Thanks for all the help.

Jamie
You might have leakage from the fridge. Maybe it's time to replace it, although I would think 11 years isn't old for a fridge. I've got one that's 35 years old, but not on a GFCI (finished basement). I wonder what might happen if I plug it into the GFCI...

FW
__________________

KE2KB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-04-2009, 06:46 PM   #23
UAW SKILLED TRADES
 
Stubbie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Kansas
Posts: 5,005
Default

GFCI trip form fridge


It would seem it certainly is a problem with the fridge. You would be allowed to not gfci it under 2005 or before code cycles depending on it's location...ie not close to a sink. Moisture getting on the terminal block, if you will, where the power cord is terminated could be tripping the gfci. Condensation can do it also...just some things to check.
__________________
" One nice thing about the NEC articles ... you have lots of choices"

Stubbie
Stubbie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-04-2009, 07:49 PM   #24
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: New Jersey, USA
Posts: 1,202
Default

GFCI trip form fridge


Anyone know why fridges are not grounded (double-insulated instead) when window AC are all required to have an EGC?

When I was a kid, we had a fridge that had its chassis unknowingly connected to line, and if someone touched its handle, and the nearby steam pipe... zap. Full 115V electrocution, although no one was seriously injured.
I was way too young to understand electricity, and my parents didn't have a clue. They just wrapped the handle of the refrig with electrical tape and we all knew never to touch the fridge and the pipe at the same time.

Once, a friend was nearly electrocuted, but someone had the sense to give her a shove to get her off.

If only we had GFCI's back then.

FW
__________________

KE2KB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-04-2009, 08:26 PM   #25
DIYer
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Virginia
Posts: 910
Default

GFCI trip form fridge


Quote:
Originally Posted by KE2KB View Post
If only we had GFCI's back then.

FW
If you had GFCIs back then I'm sure your parents would have bypassed it heh. 120v is unlikely to kill you, but it's not impossible. If you hit the right combo of circumstances it can get you.
Gigs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-04-2009, 08:28 PM   #26
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: New Jersey, USA
Posts: 1,202
Default

GFCI trip form fridge


Quote:
Originally Posted by Gigs View Post
If you had GFCIs back then I'm sure your parents would have bypassed it heh. 120v is unlikely to kill you, but it's not impossible. If you hit the right combo of circumstances it can get you.
Or, when I got older I might have attached an EGC to the faulty fridge and blown the fuse. Then they (my parents) would have banished me from ever playing with electricity again<g>
__________________

KE2KB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-05-2009, 12:16 AM   #27
DIY'er
 
jamiedolan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Neenah, Wisconsin, USA
Posts: 2,032
Blog Entries: 2
Default

GFCI trip form fridge


Quote:
Originally Posted by Stubbie View Post
It would seem it certainly is a problem with the fridge. You would be allowed to not gfci it under 2005 or before code cycles depending on it's location...ie not close to a sink. Moisture getting on the terminal block, if you will, where the power cord is terminated could be tripping the gfci. Condensation can do it also...just some things to check.
I'm going to take a quick look at the fridge and see if I can verify it's connections. I'll check the humidity level, it is about 20' from the laundry room, but it is heating season here, and it is pretty dry in general.

Guess it is just a fridge problem. Does this imply the fridge is dangerous? (i.e. that it may be leaking current to the metal frame).
Jamie
__________________
Jamie Dolan - Neenah, WI
Jamie Dolan Paw Dogs
Need Help Uploading Photos? Click here.
jamiedolan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-05-2009, 09:58 AM   #28
DIYer
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Virginia
Posts: 910
Default

GFCI trip form fridge


Quote:
Originally Posted by jamiedolan View Post
Guess it is just a fridge problem. Does this imply the fridge is dangerous? (i.e. that it may be leaking current to the metal frame).
Jamie
If it only happens when the motor first starts up, i.e. when you first plug it in, and never later on, then it could be a false trip. GFCIs usually aren't wrong though. They have a pretty simple job to do and they normally do it well.
Gigs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-05-2009, 06:11 PM   #29
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: New Jersey, USA
Posts: 1,202
Default

GFCI trip form fridge


Quote:
Originally Posted by Gigs View Post
If it only happens when the motor first starts up, i.e. when you first plug it in, and never later on, then it could be a false trip. GFCIs usually aren't wrong though. They have a pretty simple job to do and they normally do it well.
You know what Chris75 would say about "false GFCI trips", but we won't wake him, will we<g>

FW
__________________

KE2KB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-05-2009, 06:16 PM   #30
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Iowa
Posts: 1,543
Default

GFCI trip form fridge


False trips?

They do trip for a reason...don't know what your talking about

rgsgww is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Help My Admiral Refrigerator is leaking water Cuwillis Appliances 10 03-25-2014 08:21 AM
GFCI Question Mdbuilder Electrical 6 06-19-2008 03:15 PM
Gfci Stays Trip CAJUN_MAN Electrical 6 12-14-2007 11:49 AM
GFCI questions 5circles Electrical 4 11-05-2007 08:24 PM
GFCI outlet vs. breaker - GF trip speed LanterDan Electrical 2 01-09-2007 06:05 AM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.