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-   -   GFCI & Single Pole Switch combo (http://www.diychatroom.com/f18/gfci-single-pole-switch-combo-42144/)

II Weeks 04-09-2009 11:16 PM

GFCI & Single Pole Switch combo
 
I have a Hubble GFCI/ single pole switch combo and from the back it looks like a normal GFCI with two brass screws and two silver BUT with two black wires coming out of the bottom. ( was hoping for terminals)I looked at the Hubble site and cant find a wiring diagram. I tried the light (black and white ) wires on the two wires coming out of the back but nada.

Anyone have a clue on this one, it would be appreciated. Thanks

PaliBob 04-10-2009 05:42 AM

Here is the Hubbell datasheet for the current model:
http://www.hubbellcatalog.com/HomeSe...asp?PN=GFSP15I

Do you have a meter ?

II Weeks 04-10-2009 06:55 AM

I'll have to get back to you on that model number but that looks like it and yeah, I have a meter and I tested a lot of different combination s with those wires

dSilanskas 04-10-2009 06:56 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by II Weeks (Post 257614)
I have a Hubble GFCI/ single pole switch combo and from the back it looks like a normal GFCI with two brass screws and two silver BUT with two black wires coming out of the bottom. ( was hoping for terminals)I looked at the Hubble site and cant find a wiring diagram. I tried the light (black and white ) wires on the two wires coming out of the back but nada.

Anyone have a clue on this one, it would be appreciated. Thanks


Well lets see. You need the neutral to go on the sliver screw that is obvious for the GFCI. And the rest is like a single pole switch. Power goes to one copper screw and the light goes to the other. Now are you sure you have power there and if you do it is possible that the device is not good anymore.

HouseHelper 04-10-2009 07:03 AM

The screws should be designated as line and load (silver-neutral, brass-hot). The two wires are for the hot and switched hot to whatever it is you want to control. What wires are in the box now (color, function, number)?

darren 04-10-2009 08:37 AM

I wonder why on the product sheet they show the plug upside down, i better go and have a talk with them. I am just kidding of course.

Stubbie 04-10-2009 09:33 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by II Weeks (Post 257655)
I'll have to get back to you on that model number but that looks like it and yeah, I have a meter and I tested a lot of different combination s with those wires

And the results were??? And how did you test them?

MY guess is the device is fine and you wire it as Househelper has already stated. If you bought it new it should have a wiring diagram in the box or on the box itself.

Like he said what wires/cables are in the box and what is their function?...Incoming power with neutral.... black and white switch loop...? And don't forget the possibility of a burned out light bulb...:)

PaliBob 04-10-2009 11:52 AM

Darren, I know you were just kidding about the GFCI being upside down. When 3 prong receptacles were just getting real popular most manufacturers showed the ground pin on top. I believe the reason was that since the ground pin on a plug is longer, it would be easier to visually line up the plug with the receptacle.
http://www.hubbell-wiring.com/Press/PDFS/H5212.pdf

Trivia
Quote:

from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Domesti...gs_and_sockets
The three-prong plug was invented by Philip F. Labre, while he was attending the Milwaukee School of Engineering (MSOE). It is said that his landlady had a cat which would knock over her fan when it came in the window. When she plugged the fan back in, she would get an electric shock. Labre figured out that if the plug were grounded, the electricity would go to earth through the plug rather than his landlady. He applied for and was issued a patent for grounding receptacle and plug on June 5, 1928.
and from the same source, a historical note on Hubbell:
Quote:

......The original two blade electrical plug and socket were invented by Harvey Hubbell and patented in 1904. He left one socket hole bigger than the other, so that people would not electrocute themselves by putting a plug upside down into a socket.
sorry to digress but this stuff is really fun

darren 04-10-2009 01:06 PM

Hey Bob thanks for that link to wikipedia, when i have more time i am going to read through it.

The idea of haveing ground up is safety bonus as well, if you were usueing stainless plates and for some strange reason the plate fell off the first prong it wll hit is the ground.

I was pulling wire in once and was pulling on the fish tape and letting it fall behind me. Directly behind was a worn out plug and our extension cord was half hanging out. So when the fish tape went back it landed squarly on the hot and neutral with a nice little bang and a good scorch mark in our fishtape.

II Weeks 04-10-2009 05:59 PM

1 Attachment(s)
thanks guys for all the feedback. Sorry I was at work and couldnt respond sooner.
Heres what worked:

Black feed went to "Line" AND the black wire from the GFCI/Switch that is closest to the terminal. ( Why this isnt done internally, I dont know)

The white feed AND the white light go to the silver side marked line.

The black from the light then goes to the remaining black wire from the GFCI.


Works fine but what a pain in the arse. Lesson learned besides this, DONT THROW AWAY UNFAMILIAR SWITCH BOXES! Im sure the wiring diagram was in there.

Once again guys, thanks and save this crib note, it might come handy one day.

use these, it helps

SD515 04-10-2009 06:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by II Weeks (Post 257940)
....
Black feed went to "Line" AND the black wire from the GFCI/Switch that is closest to the terminal. ( Why this isnt done internally, I dont know)....


Usually it's not done internally by the manufacturer because they don't know what the switch is going to control in the end. Most switches control lights, and since lights don't have to be GFCI'd, they can save a few pennies by not doing it. If you want the load of the switch to be GFCI protected, just attach one of the switch lead wires to the black (hot) terminal of the 'load' side of the GFCI, and the other switch lead wire to the black wire going to the load. Also attach the white (neutral) wire going to the load to the white terminal of the 'load' side of the GFCI. The GFCI will then 'see' the load, and protect it accordingly.

II Weeks 04-10-2009 06:44 PM

that makes sense. Thanks SD515.

::saving to notes::

SD515 04-10-2009 06:57 PM

:thumbsup:


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