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bob9785 07-08-2011 05:05 AM

GFCI and Single Pole Switch
 
I have an outlet that I'm replacing with a GFCI (its an old house with no ground wires). This outlet is connected to a single pole switch. The power (2 wires, black and white) goes to the outlet and then there are another 2 wires (black and white) going from the outlet to the switch. Is it possible to wire this? What would I need to do to get this working?

Everything I tried either trips the GFCI when I turn off the outlet or just trips the whole breaker when I reset the GFCI.

AllanJ 07-08-2011 05:21 AM

Does it trip even if nothing is plugged into the outlet and any light also connect to the switch has its lamp unscrewed?

Double check your wiring in the outlet box to have: White from power cable to line side silver or white (or receptacle body side with larger prong slots) of receptacle unit. Black from switch cable to line side gold or black (side with smaller prong slots) of receptacle. Other two wires connected to each other. Nothing connected to load side terminals of receptacle unit. All ground wires (green and/or bare) to each other with an extra length of bare wire connected to receptacle green screw if no green wire already provided.

jbfan 07-08-2011 06:31 AM

You can not wire this gfci up.
Modern GFCI receptacles require power to be able to reset.
When you turn the switch off, kill power to the gfci, then you have to reset it everytime you need it.

You can lose the switch if you need gfci protection.



I was incorrect about this info, so please disregard.

HouseHelper 07-08-2011 09:43 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jbfan (Post 681869)
You can not wire this gfci up.
Modern GFCI receptacles require power to be able to reset.
When you turn the switch off, kill power to the gfci, then you have to reset it everytime you need it.

You can lose the switch if you need gfci protection.

Not sure that's correct... yes, you need power to initially reset the GFCI, but unless it trips, it should power up each time the switch is turned on without having to be reset.

brric 07-08-2011 09:56 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by HouseHelper (Post 681988)
Not sure that's correct... yes, you need power to initially reset the GFCI, but unless it trips, it should power up each time the switch is turned on without having to be reset.

Agreed. That has been my experience.

AllanJ 07-08-2011 07:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jbfan (Post 681869)
You can not wire this gfci up.
Modern GFCI receptacles require power to be able to reset.
When you turn the switch off, kill power to the gfci, then you have to reset it everytime you need it..

Are you sure?

That would mean that in case of power failure, all the GFCI units in the house would trip and need to be reset when power is restored. Increase the chance of food spoilage if a refrigerator had to be plugged into a protected receptacle and then did not get its power back automatically when power was restored.

I don't recall this happening in my house, however all the GFCI's are more than 4 years old.

bob9785 07-08-2011 10:03 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AllanJ (Post 681835)
Double check your wiring in the outlet box to have: White from power cable to line side silver or white (or side with larger prong slots) of receptacle unit. Black from switch cable to line side gold or black (side with smaller prong slots) of receptacle. Other two wires connected to each other. Nothing connected to load side terminals of receptacle unit. All ground wires (green and/or bare) to each other with an extra length of bare wire connected to receptacle green screw if no green wire already provided.

Thanks! That was the issue, the wires were not setup correctly. They originally (just purchased the house), had pig tails for the black wire from the outlet and black wire from the switch, and that would be reversed anyway for a normal outlet, I think.

But this setup works with the GFCI, and the GFCI does not trip when the switch is turned off.

(I'll also mention that these were all brand new Leviton SmartLock GFCI's purchased at home depot a couple days ago.)

jbfan 07-09-2011 10:40 AM

See my edit in post #3!

tdfulk 07-16-2011 11:05 AM

Here is a diagram for a switched receptacle. It is not GFCI but the wiring principals are the same http://www.howtoelectric.com/diagram...wiring-diagram


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