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Old 02-03-2009, 04:09 PM   #1
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GFCI requirements


Does anyone know if GFCI are required in all kitchen outlets in Canada? I have read that the NEC does but I know up here there are quite a few small differences?

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Old 02-03-2009, 04:45 PM   #2
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GFCI requirements


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Does anyone know if GFCI are required in all kitchen outlets in Canada? I have read that the NEC does but I know up here there are quite a few small differences?
In Ontario we are required to have 3 split receptacles in the kitchen. Each one fed by 2 pole, 15 amp breakers. This requires a separate 14/3 run to the panel. GFCI recepts. cannot be split! If you would like GFCI, a 2 pole, 15 amp GFCI breaker would have to be used!

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Old 02-03-2009, 04:57 PM   #3
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In Ontario we are required to have 3 split receptacles in the kitchen. Each one fed by 2 pole, 15 amp breakers. This requires a separate 14/3 run to the panel. GFCI recepts. cannot be split! If you would like GFCI, a 2 pole, 15 amp GFCI breaker would have to be used!
Thanks. Mine are run as split receptacles, but I have never seen a kitchen plug as a GFCI. It appears that its common in the US.
ps
Its ok to run 2 seperate 14/2 wires to the split plug right?
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Old 02-03-2009, 05:36 PM   #4
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GFCI requirements


In BC only plugs within 1.5m of a sink need to be GFCI. I have never heard of running a split receptacle with 2 14/2 cables. I don't know if it is a code violation though.
GFCI code only applies to new work. You are not required to retrofit your old receptacles unless you are renovating the kitchen.

Current code allows for 15 amp split receptacles OR 20 amp T slots. It is your choice which type or combination of the two you want to use.
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Old 02-03-2009, 05:47 PM   #5
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GFCI requirements


Two 14/2 cables would work! Its a bit more expensive though! However, split recepts. MUST be fed from a 2 pole, ganged breaker!
Its considered dangerous to have two voltage sources in box, without a dual disconnect!
Otherwise, the home owner may put a tester into one outlet, turn off the supply breaker and assume that the power is off. Then, when removing the receptacle, they get electrocuted!
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Old 02-03-2009, 06:00 PM   #6
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GFCI requirements


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Two 14/2 cables would work! Its a bit more expensive though! However, split recepts. MUST be fed from a 2 pole, ganged breaker!
Its considered dangerous to have two voltage sources in box, without a dual disconnect!
Otherwise, the home owner may put a tester into one outlet, turn off the supply breaker and assume that the power is off. Then, when removing the receptacle, they get electrocuted!
Thanks for the info guys. I assume the ganged breaker means the ones where the switches are connected, making them both turn on or off at the same time, which is what I have.
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Old 02-03-2009, 06:07 PM   #7
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GFCI requirements


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Thanks for the info guys. I assume the ganged breaker means the ones where the switches are connected, making them both turn on or off at the same time, which is what I have.
Yes! So that all the power to the receptacle is turned off!
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Old 02-03-2009, 06:25 PM   #8
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GFCI requirements


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In BC only plugs within 1.5m of a sink need to be GFCI. I have never heard of running a split receptacle with 2 14/2 cables. I don't know if it is a code violation though.
GFCI code only applies to new work. You are not required to retrofit your old receptacles unless you are renovating the kitchen.

Current code allows for 15 amp split receptacles OR 20 amp T slots. It is your choice which type or combination of the two you want to use.

Joe.,

I thought they don't allowed the split receptacles anymore I know they used in exsting installments but for new construction I doubt it can you confirm this one ?

Merci,Marc
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Old 02-03-2009, 06:26 PM   #9
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GFCI requirements


Just to add the GFI in the kitchen would have to be a 20A GFI with 12 gauge and on a 20A breaker.

How much are you upgradeing in your kitchen, there a few differneces in requirements between the NEC and Canadian Electrical Code for your kitchen circuits. If you need to know more let us know.
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Old 02-03-2009, 07:23 PM   #10
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GFCI requirements


You can use either 20 amp or 15 split. The 20amp was added I beleive to make GFCI protection easier/cheaper near the sink.
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Old 02-04-2009, 04:19 PM   #11
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Joed i have been only in the trade for a few years but i know in the 2002 code book before the GFI rule came in you would have been able to use the 20A t-slot in place of the 15A split. So when the GFI rule came in they had to go to 20A because you obviously can't have a split GFI.
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Old 02-04-2009, 07:39 PM   #12
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GFCI requirements


You can still use 15amp split away from sink with no GFCI. You can also use 15amp split near a sink IF you use a double pole GFCI breaker. It's too expensive so no one does that though. At least in Ontario you can.
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Old 02-04-2009, 09:58 PM   #13
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You can still use 15amp split away from sink with no GFCI. You can also use 15amp split near a sink IF you use a double pole GFCI breaker. It's too expensive so no one does that though. At least in Ontario you can.
Thats the way I understood it too. Thanks.

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