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Old 08-31-2012, 12:46 PM   #1
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GFCI overload


What happens if I have a 15A GFCI receptacle and I connect a 2000W heater (16.6A) to it?

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Old 08-31-2012, 12:51 PM   #2
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GFCI overload


GFIs do not trip due to overload. A 15 amp GFI can be on a 20 amp circuit.

What size is the circuit feeding the GFI?

Fifteen amps is 1800 watts. A breaker can hold 125% for over an hour.

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Old 08-31-2012, 12:55 PM   #3
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GFCI overload


GFI's do not protect againt over loads, breakers or fuses do that.
Why would you even think about plugging that heater in that circut knowing it's going to case an overload.
Not a great plan unless it's 12-2 wire and a 20 amp breaker.
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Old 08-31-2012, 12:58 PM   #4
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GFCI overload


The 2000 watt heater will have a 20 amp plug and would not fit a 15 amp gfci.
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Old 08-31-2012, 01:06 PM   #5
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GFCI overload


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The 2000 watt heater will have a 20 amp plug and would not fit a 15 amp gfci.
I have a picture that shows it can be done if you try hard enough.
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Old 08-31-2012, 01:09 PM   #6
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GFCI overload


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I have a picture that shows it can be done if you try hard enough.
Oh.... I love pics.... please share!
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Old 08-31-2012, 01:11 PM   #7
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GFCI overload


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I have a picture that shows it can be done if you try hard enough.
YEA, but I was thinking that he wasn't going to try that hard.
I think we have a couple of microwaves like that at work.
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Old 08-31-2012, 01:15 PM   #8
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GFCI overload


Lets just say pliers and a twisting motion were involved. The pic really isn't clear enough.
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Old 08-31-2012, 01:22 PM   #9
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GFCI overload


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Lets just say pliers and a twisting motion were involved. The pic really isn't clear enough.
I kind of figured that's what transpired. I've seen a few of those installs.
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Old 08-31-2012, 01:55 PM   #10
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GFCI overload


Thanx to all who answered. The reason I'm asking is because I have a 1800 watt heater that you plug into a wall. That's exactly 15A. I'm preparing a rental unit. You can't always control what happens in a rental unit. If the tenant connects something bigger, say a 2000W heater, then I wanted to know if the GFCI receptacle would act as a circuit breaker. I guess not judging from your answers.
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Old 08-31-2012, 02:00 PM   #11
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GFCI overload


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Originally Posted by jackwashere View Post
Thanx to all who answered. The reason I'm asking is because I have a 1800 watt heater that you plug into a wall. That's exactly 15A. I'm preparing a rental unit. You can't always control what happens in a rental unit. If the tenant connects something bigger, say a 2000W heater, then I wanted to know if the GFCI receptacle would act as a circuit breaker. I guess not judging from your answers.
A GFCI contains no over current device.

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