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Old 01-24-2011, 08:13 PM   #1
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GFCI Outlets in Series


Okay, so....I have one GFCI outlet that looks like the standard GFCI outlet with the test and reset button.
All three of the Kitchen countertop outlets as well as one on the wall by the floor AND the outlet on the half bath counter AND the outlet on the full bath counter upstairs are all wired in series to this GFCI outlet between the dining room and kitchen.
My question is.....
I am changing all of the outlets in my home from ugly old beige to white....changing toggle switches to rocker switches, etc.
since none of the other outlets wired in a series to that one GFCI outlet have the reset and test button, do I just change them with normal duplex outlets or can I change them for GFCI outlets? My home inspector assured me at purchase that they were up to code since they were wired in series, and they do function properly....if any moisture is detected in the outlets wired in series, it trips the GFCI in the dining room and I have to go to that outlet to reset everything.
Any special considerations?

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Old 01-24-2011, 08:28 PM   #2
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GFCI Outlets in Series


As long as the downstream outlets off of the GFCI are wired to the Load side, yes you can change. You only need one GFCI per circuit, not multiple ones after the main one.

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Old 01-24-2011, 08:39 PM   #3
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GFCI Outlets in Series


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As long as the downstream outlets off of the GFCI are wired to the Load side, yes you can change. You only need one GFCI per circuit, not multiple ones after the main one.
Thank you so much for your response. But could I put GFCI outlets in for the change so I can press reset buttons at the outlet that actually tripped vs. running downstairs to the dining room each time it happens....
doesn't happen a lot, but in upstairs bathroom with hairdryers, etc next to sink....

I replaced them with regular outlets for now...and just duplicated the wiring configuration they had.....

But I think....visually...to buyers (as I am beginning some upgrades with selling in the next few years) it will make sense to see GFCI outlets at these locations.

What do you think?
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Old 01-24-2011, 09:18 PM   #4
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GFCI Outlets in Series


With GFCI outlets chained together, it's essentially random which one along the chain will actually trip on a ground fault, so it won't necessarily be the one that the wet or defective appliance was plugged into.

The standard outlets downstream of the existing GFCI should ideally have "GFCI Protected" stickers on them so people know that they are protected appropriately for where they are located.
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Old 01-24-2011, 09:34 PM   #5
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With GFCI outlets chained together, it's essentially random which one along the chain will actually trip on a ground fault, so it won't necessarily be the one that the wet or defective appliance was plugged into.

The standard outlets downstream of the existing GFCI should ideally have "GFCI Protected" stickers on them so people know that they are protected appropriately for where they are located.
I understand that it wouldn't "matter" per se....however...if I am in the upstairs bathroom splashing water on my face and then it comes to be that a hairdryer won't turn on from that outlet.....well, then I know I tripped that outlet because the water I splashed certainly didn't travel down a flight of stairs through the living room, into the dining room and trip the GFCI outlet on the outside wall....
So, as elementary as my question may seem....aside from the stickered notation COULD I wire GFCI outlets to replace the ones in series OR would I still have to traipse downstairs to the dining room regardless of what outlet tripped the ground fault?

I'm looking to consider aesthetics, convenience and electrical appropriateness....
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Old 01-24-2011, 10:03 PM   #6
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GFCI Outlets in Series


You should be able to wire the circuit so that all the outlets are independent. You will need to pigtail all your connections instead of using both the LINE and LOAD. So take your incoming hot wire and pigtail it to the outgoing hot as well as to the wire going to the LINE hot terminal. Same for the neutral wires. In this configuration you won't use the LOAD terminals. You will need to make sure all outlets in the circuit are GFCI as now all the downstream outlets won't be protected.
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Old 01-24-2011, 11:52 PM   #7
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GFCI Outlets in Series


just rember those gfci's are 15-20$ each depending if they are 15 or 20 amp.

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