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Old 10-03-2011, 08:51 AM   #1
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GFCI code requirements


Hi all,

I am finishing a basement that will have a wet bar and a bathroom, and I'm getting ready to run the electrical. I have a question about the general code requirements when it comes to GFCI's.

In a book I'm reading about finishing basements, it says that the GFCI "must be on a separate 12/2-wire home run to the panel."

Does this mean that the only outlets that can share a circuit with the GFCI are those fed off of the GFCI's load terminal?

Thanks for your help.

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Old 10-03-2011, 09:22 AM   #2
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GFCI code requirements


Bathrooms have their own rules..
One 20 amp circuit can support all the bathroom receptacles in the house with the first one have a GFCI and the rest connected to the load.
OR
One 20 amp circuit dedicated to each bathroom for all electrical in it with receptacle(s) having GFCI


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Old 10-03-2011, 12:45 PM   #3
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GFCI code requirements


And all receptacles within 6' of that wet bar must be GFCI protected, but do not have to be on a dedicated circuit. As A7 said- do not put these on the bathroom circuit.
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Old 10-03-2011, 02:41 PM   #4
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GFCI code requirements


The bar sink will have 3 outlets within 6 feet of it so I will have protection on all 3 of those.

The bathroom is very small with a single outlet and a light. I guess my question is, can I put anything else on this bathroom circuit or must I dedicate one to that room alone?

There will be 8 sconce lamps and a pool table light for lighting, and then about 10 wall outlets.

I was planning on one circuit for the lights but do all of the wall outlets need their own circuit or can I share any of them on the wet bar or bathroom circuits?

Thanks.
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Old 10-03-2011, 08:09 PM   #5
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GFCI code requirements


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Originally Posted by Richo View Post
The bar sink will have 3 outlets within 6 feet of it so I will have protection on all 3 of those.

You only need one GFCI receptacle here, if not using a GFCI breaker. Put the source on the 'line' of the GFCI, then the outgoing cable to the next recpt on the 'load' terminals. Wire the 2nd and 3rd as any other duplex would be wired.
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The bathroom is very small with a single outlet and a light. I guess my question is, can I put anything else on this bathroom circuit or must I dedicate one to that room alone?

If you’re putting the light on with the receptacle, then the circuit has to stay in the bathroom. If you put the receptacle on a 20A circuit by itself (without the light[s], or other equipment), then that can feed other receptacles in other baths. Only baths, and only receptacles. But that frees up the lighting circuit to come and go to other rooms.
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There will be 8 sconce lamps and a pool table light for lighting, and then about 10 wall outlets. I was planning on one circuit for the lights but do all of the wall outlets need their own circuit or can I share any of them on the wet bar or bathroom circuits? Thanks.

The ‘10 wall outlets’ cannot come off the circuit that has the bath receptacle(s) on it. It can however be on with the wet-bar outlets, and won’t be required to be GFCI protected unless within 6’ of a sink. These 10 outlets could also be on the same circuit as the bath light, if and only if, the bath receptacle(s) is not also on it. In this ‘pool table/wet bar area’ I’d probably put the lights on one circuit, the 13 receptacles on another (possibly even split them on 2 separate circuits…depends on what you plan to run off them), and put the entire bath on its own.
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Old 10-03-2011, 08:13 PM   #6
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GFCI code requirements


Quote:
Originally Posted by Richo View Post
Hi all,

I am finishing a basement that will have a wet bar and a bathroom, and I'm getting ready to run the electrical. I have a question about the general code requirements when it comes to GFCI's.

In a book I'm reading about finishing basements, it says that the GFCI "must be on a separate 12/2-wire home run to the panel."

Does this mean that the only outlets that can share a circuit with the GFCI are those fed off of the GFCI's load terminal?

Thanks for your help.
First thing is, throw that book out and get a copy of the NEC. I personally would not trust the majority of the DIYer type home books out there, other than using to keep a leg of a table propped up, so that it does not wobble.
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Old 10-03-2011, 08:17 PM   #7
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GFCI code requirements


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...other than using to keep a leg of a table propped up, so that it does not wobble.
Gotta alot of faith in that book, huh? Think it's even good for that?
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Old 10-03-2011, 08:26 PM   #8
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Kyle, I do not even place faith in Black & Decker's Complete Home wiring guide for some of the stuff they show. That is why I keep coming back here and pay attention to everything that the full time sparky's state, and place more trust in the NEC, than someone's interpretation in a book, which we all have seen is not any good.
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Old 10-03-2011, 08:37 PM   #9
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Old 10-03-2011, 11:12 PM   #10
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GFCI code requirements


SD515, the information you provided was exactly what I needed, and very helpful.

Based on what you told me, the stuff written in the book I have is correct, just not explained in enough detail. The book covers every phase of a basement remodel so it's not ready for the wobbly table yet

Since there are no other baths to wire, I will just put the bath outlet and light on its own circuit, the rest of the lights on another, and then half the outlets on the circuit with the bar GFCI and the other half on another circuit.

Thanks for all your replies

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