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-   -   GFCI Code? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f18/gfci-code-46208/)

rick208 06-08-2009 11:48 AM

GFCI Code?
 
I had my safety inspector do a walk through the other day at work, and he is telling me that I have to have a GFCI for the coke machine, refer., and microwaves in our breakroom. Basicaly he said every recep. should be GFCI protected.

Is this right?

Sorry if I am asking a question that has been beat to death. I did do a search, but didn't really find what I was looking for.

Thanks,
Rickey

Jim Port 06-08-2009 12:04 PM

Under the 2008 NEC the following locations would need GFI protection for personnel; Bathrooms, Kitchens, Rooftops, Outdoors, and if the receptacle was within 6' of the outside edge of a sink.

300zx 06-08-2009 12:06 PM

Commercial occupancies. Per 210.8, you must install GFCI protection for all 15A and 20A, 125V receptacles located in bathrooms, rooftops, and kitchens in commercial/industrial facilities.

hayewe farm 06-08-2009 01:48 PM

Now the question is, what constitutes a Kitchen?

ScottR 06-08-2009 02:04 PM

Kitchen. An area with a sink and permanent facilities for food preparation and cooking.

-- New for 2008 NEC. (If that's applicable in your area).

IMO the microwaves are not permanent*, so it's not a kitchen. (Do you even have a sink in there?) But I guess that's open to interpretation.

*Edit: Err, unless they are permanently mounted/built in, of course.

rick208 06-08-2009 02:08 PM

Thanks for the replys guys.

I guess the refer compressor kicking on, isn't enough of a fluctuation to cause the GFCI to trip?

tincan44 06-08-2009 02:41 PM

A Safety Inspector is usually not the same as a County/City Electrical inspector.
Your employer and or insurance company may have much more strict requirements than the NEC.

You could ask your Safety Inspector to show you the Code he is quoting from. They usually like to be respected as a Teacher.

NEC Art. 90.4 Enforcement.
This Code is intended to be suitable
for mandatory application by governmental bodies that exercise
legal jurisdiction over electrical installations, including
signaling and communications systems, and for use by
insurance inspectors. The authority having jurisdiction for
enforcement of the
Code has the responsibility for making
interpretations of the rules, for deciding on the approval of
equipment and materials, and for granting the special permission
contemplated in a number of the rules.
By special permission, the authority having jurisdiction
may waive specific requirements in this
Code or permit
alternative methods where it is assured that equivalent objectives
can be achieved by establishing and maintaining
effective safety.
This
Code may require new products, constructions, or
materials that may not yet be available at the time the
Code

is adopted. In such event, the authority having jurisdiction
may permit the use of the products, constructions, or materials
that comply with the most recent previous edition of
this
Code adopted by the jurisdiction.

GFCI
NEC Art. 210.8 (B) Other Than Dwelling Units.
All 125-volt, singlephase,
15- and 20-ampere receptacles installed in the locations
specified in (1) through (5) shall have ground-fault
circuit-interrupter protection for personnel:
(1) Bathrooms
(2) Commercial and institutional kitchens—for the purposes
of this section, a kitchen is an area with a sink and permanent
facilities for food preparation and cooking
(3) Rooftops
(4) Outdoors in public spaces—for the purpose of this section
a public space is defined as any space that is for
use by, or is accessible to, the public

Exception to (3) and (4): Receptacles that are not readily
accessible and are supplied from a dedicated branch circuit
for electric snow-melting or deicing equipment shall be
permitted to be installed in accordance with the applicable
provisions of Article 426.
(5) Outdoors, where installed to comply with 210.63

I hope this info helps.

Yoyizit 06-08-2009 04:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rick208 (Post 284498)
Thanks for the replys guys.

I guess the refer compressor kicking on, isn't enough of a fluctuation to cause the GFCI to trip?

In principle, no.
http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&c..._nhi=&safe=off

DangerMouse 06-08-2009 04:40 PM

reefer? you musta been a Navy man?

DM

rick208 06-08-2009 09:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Yoyizit (Post 284561)

I think I will keep my refrigerator the way it is. I would hate to walk in on a Monday morning to find the gfi tripped.:eek:

rick208 06-08-2009 09:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DangerMouse (Post 284577)
reefer? you musta been a Navy man?

DM

I am no navy man. i just work in the meat industry where there is refrigerated trucks, refrigerated rooms, refrigerated coolers, refrigerated freezers, and even refrigerators in the breakroom. Thats a lot of refrigeration so I like to short hand it a bit.:wink:

Gigs 06-09-2009 08:58 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rick208 (Post 284721)
I think I will keep my refrigerator the way it is. I would hate to walk in on a Monday morning to find the gfi tripped.:eek:

You should definitely install the GFCI outlet.

Just make sure that if the GFCI should happen to break as soon as the inspector leaves, you don't accidentally replace the refrigerator GFCI with a regular outlet. That would be bad, of course. :laughing:

Scuba_Dave 06-09-2009 09:04 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rick208 (Post 284422)
I had my safety inspector do a walk through the other day at work, and he is telling me that I have to have a GFCI for the coke machine, refer., and microwaves in our breakroom. Basicaly he said every recep. should be GFCI protected.

Is this right?

Sorry if I am asking a question that has been beat to death. I did do a search, but didn't really find what I was looking for.

Thanks,
Rickey

I think you would need to make your safety Inspector happy
Work places tend to be inspsected closer then homeowners work around here.

Jim Port 06-09-2009 12:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rick208 (Post 284721)
I think I will keep my refrigerator the way it is. I would hate to walk in on a Monday morning to find the gfi tripped.:eek:


The UL standard for acceptable leakage is many times lower than the trip level for a GFI. If it were to trip it is doing its job. Which would you rather have, a spoiled refer of food or someone getting shocked or worse?

Even sump pumps are required to be GFI protected. Dead people are worse than a flooded basement.

Yoyizit 06-09-2009 12:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jim Port (Post 284975)
The UL standard for acceptable leakage is many times lower than the trip level for a GFI. If it were to trip it is doing its job. Which would you rather have, a spoiled refer of food (at likelihood ~50%) or someone getting shocked or worse (at likelihood 1 in 250,000)?

Even sump pumps are required to be GFI protected. Dead people are worse than a flooded basement.

Run a ground wire from the metal fridge shell to ground. No more shock danger.


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