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-   -   gfci breaker (http://www.diychatroom.com/f18/gfci-breaker-151378/)

carmst 07-24-2012 01:21 PM

gfci breaker
 
........

MisterZ 07-24-2012 04:02 PM

Are the wires hooked to the correct screws?
It makes a difference which set of screws you use.
One pair is for the gfi outlet, and the other pair to supply gfi protection to another device.
Wired upside down will result in non-gfi protected outlet.

curiousB 07-24-2012 04:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by carmst
gfci breaker does not trip when tested
, the panel breaker does
why?

Is the white pigtail wire of the gfci connected to the neutral buss bar or wire nutted with the load white wire. It won't test if the pigtail doesn't go to the buss bar.

carmst 07-24-2012 10:06 PM

Yes curious they are connected correct. I have 4 gfci's and none of them are triping. they eeach have their own 20 amp breaker in the panel ande all of the breakers willl trip but nopt any of the gfci's. I bought them from wal mart. could they possibly all be defective?

carmst 07-24-2012 10:08 PM

Msiter z they are in the correct place. and as i told curious, none of the 4 gfci's will trip
This is all new wireing and a new panel box.

any ideas?

MisterZ 07-24-2012 10:11 PM

It is quite possible they are defective. Four in a row may be stretching it, but its possible.
Just curious, how are you testing these?

carmst 07-24-2012 10:27 PM

.......

brric 07-25-2012 04:58 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by carmst (Post 973669)
I am using a #14 wire stripped 1/2 inch on both ends and holding it with rubber coated side cutters. This is correct am I right? Like a kid sticking a bobby pin in it except with rubber to protect me

OMG! That's brilliant!

kbsparky 07-25-2012 05:03 AM

Let me get the straight: You're "testing" your GFCI receptacles with a dead short between the slots of the outlets?

That will certainly blow the circuit breaker. And quite possibly damage the GFCI circuitry in each device.

What happens when you press the "test" button on those outlets?

andrew79 07-25-2012 06:46 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by carmst
I am using a #14 wire stripped 1/2 inch on both ends and holding it with rubber coated side cutters. This is correct am I right? Like a kid sticking a bobby pin in it except with rubber to protect me

While your at it why dont you try it with a capacitor instead of a wire. If your going to try and hurt yourself might as well do it right.

danpik 07-25-2012 06:52 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by carmst (Post 973669)
I am using a #14 wire stripped 1/2 inch on both ends and holding it with rubber coated side cutters. This is correct am I right? Like a kid sticking a bobby pin in it except with rubber to protect me

The OCPD is doing exactly what it should be doing in this case. Protecting the circuit from a dead short. GFCI's do not trip in the event of a dead short, thet trip when current leakage is detected. The circuitry in a GFCI monitors the incoming and outgoing current flow to see if it is the same. When the current flow back thru the neutral is lower than the hot then the device senses it and trips. In a dead short, the current flow on the neutral is the same as the hot so the GFCI will not see the event.

busman 07-25-2012 07:19 AM

Anyone want to nominate this person for a Darwin award?

jeffnc 07-25-2012 08:25 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by danpik (Post 973779)
The OCPD is doing exactly what it should be doing in this case. Protecting the circuit from a dead short. GFCI's do not trip in the event of a dead short, thet trip when current leakage is detected. The circuitry in a GFCI monitors the incoming and outgoing current flow to see if it is the same. When the current flow back thru the neutral is lower than the hot then the device senses it and trips. In a dead short, the current flow on the neutral is the same as the hot so the GFCI will not see the event.

Finally, someone who understands how GFCI works. I've talked to licensed electricians who do not understand this.

This is why GFCIs do NOT protect you from electrocuting yourself if you touch the hot and neutral on the same device. No current is leaking to a "ground" outside of the circuit.

What the OP described is working exactly like it is supposed to. Assuming he is shorting the hot to the neutral, then the panel breaker should trip and the GFCI should not. This is actually a valid test I suppose, to make sure your GFCI is working correctly.

A lot of people also think a GFCI needs to be connected to ground to work correctly. Maybe GFCI is a bit of a misnomer because it confuses a lot of people. Instead of GFCI maybe it should be CLCI - Current Leak Circuit Interruptor. Or EGFCI - External Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter.

jbfan 07-25-2012 08:30 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by busman (Post 973790)
Anyone want to nominate this person for a Darwin award?

Seconded!:thumbsup:

curiousB 07-25-2012 09:33 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by carmst (Post 973659)
Yes curious they are connected correct.

How do you arrive at this? You haven't said anything to convince me of it.

A GFCI breaker should trip when the test button is pressed if only it is plugged into the panel and the neutral pigtail is terminated on the neutral bus. Nothing needs to be connected on the load side. I would sort out that most simplest scenario before even connecting a load.

Honestly, you don't seem to be very knowledgeable in such matters and since GFCIs are for protection this might be one time to call up a professional. Do you really want protection devices that don't protect? Who in your family can you live without?


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