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Old 11-30-2010, 05:19 AM   #16
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Generator/Transfer Switch Install Questions


I found a picture of one we did with the junction box.
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Old 11-30-2010, 09:25 AM   #17
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Generator/Transfer Switch Install Questions


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I use a rigid nipple because of the diameter of pvc terminal adapters makes for a much bigger hole if you come out of the side of the panel through the stud.
That's just what I'm going to do except I can't punch that big a hole in the stud, so I'm going to set the 6x6 beneath, protruding just as you suggested, and get into the main panel from the bottom, where it's unobstructed.
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Old 11-30-2010, 12:27 PM   #18
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Generator/Transfer Switch Install Questions


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What's the big deal with the permit?
Permits make it legal install and protect you should anything happen and you need to file a homeowners claim.


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Service is already in place. From an electrical perspective this is a relatively simple project.
Simple does not change the fact it must be inspected and the POCO will want it checked out for sure. It's not only your life, but think about them.

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Your point is well taken. But for me, good judgment trumps legal, every time.
Proof your judgment is suspect at minimum.
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Old 11-30-2010, 12:31 PM   #19
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Generator/Transfer Switch Install Questions


[quote=J.
Proof your judgment is suspect at minimum.[/quote]

Tsk tsk. There's no call to get nasty.
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Old 12-05-2010, 08:46 AM   #20
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Generator/Transfer Switch Install Questions


OK Everyone. Here was my compromise. I hired a local career electrical contractor (friend of a friend) for review of my plans and follow-up after completion. I got the job completed in one long day. And it all works perfectly.

I swapped the two pole breakers in the setup for all single poles and came up with 5 20 Amp circuits and 7 15 Amps. 10kW is more than enough for standby power even in a relatively large house. The original electrician laid out the circuits in a very logical way.

I'm glad I took everyone's advice to get some input as I had one pair of 20 Amp circuits running on a common neutral. The electrician showed me how to identify those circuits and move them correctly so they were in phase.

Special thanks to Wirenut for the advice on the 6x6 box to connect the flush mount load center to the surface load center. Worked like a charm.

If I get motivated, I'll send some pics.

One item to note. The original GE flush mount load center, circa 1986, was NOT designed for stranded wire. The neutral bar set screws bottom out before adequate pressure is applied to the wire, especially with #14 conductors on the 15 Amp circuits. I had to double up on all the stranded neutrals to get enough pressure on the wires. This is typical of GE and a very obvious design flaw.

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Old 12-05-2010, 04:11 PM   #21
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Generator/Transfer Switch Install Questions


And here are couple of pics. Done.

One thing that did surprise me a bit was the capacity of the meter. I added up all the NG loads including generator (156 cfh), furnace (115 cfh), water heater (38 cfh), and range/oven (60 cfh). I ran the generator up to about 70% load, then turned on all the other gas appliances. The total gas load at the meter was 225 cfh on a 250 cfh rated meter. So I was pleasantly surprised to find the small meter carried the whole load without a hiccup. And it appears the rated loads are overstated by about 10% or else my NG is delivering well over 1000 btu per cf.

As I said before, this is an eazy breezy project that can be done in a couple of days by anyone with a modicum of building and electrical knowledge. Use an electrical contractor or get a permit if it makes you more comfortable. You'll sleep better knowing a pro has looked over the work.
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Last edited by Highball; 12-18-2010 at 10:42 AM.
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