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Old 07-17-2012, 07:21 PM   #16
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Generator to Home wiring...





You could do someting like this, coming out of a box with a cord clamp and then that 50 amp plug-cord combo from lowes/hd that you were talking about.

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Old 07-17-2012, 07:28 PM   #17
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Yep, a junction box like what's in your picture, except attached to an interior wall in the shed, with a 6/3 cable coming out of it into a l14-50r plug head, I like it! Also will have a 120v outlet in that junction box. I would have the 1.25" pvc tubing going into the back of that box from the outside. Will have to calk it real good.

This is starting to come together!
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Old 07-17-2012, 08:12 PM   #18
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...and, TBH, I couldn't stomach the up-front/all-at-once install cost of a NG version.
But would you consider LP?
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Old 07-17-2012, 08:15 PM   #19
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I hear you on the fuel...

Funny enough, although I wouldn't have to deal with the refueling issue, natural gas turned out to cost as much, or more than, gasoline...
Where I am they are close. I was using around $40/day in gasoline and around $45 (estimated based on published usage) in natural gas. But having suffered through the same storm you did, on Saturday morning I sat in line for an hour to get gas at one of two stations in a 20 mile radius to have power. Sunday the line was shorter, but still over 30 minutes.

There should always be natural gas. Look at the bright side though, I saved about $75 in electricity.
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Old 07-17-2012, 08:29 PM   #20
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Where I am they are close. I was using around $40/day in gasoline and around $45 (estimated based on published usage) in natural gas. But having suffered through the same storm you did, on Saturday morning I sat in line for an hour to get gas at one of two stations in a 20 mile radius to have power. Sunday the line was shorter, but still over 30 minutes.

There should always be natural gas. Look at the bright side though, I saved about $75 in electricity.
We're just outside the city of Annapolis. The city itself, rarely loses power. They didn't lose it for Irene, nor this Derencho... however where we are, if there's a black out, we're in it...

The absolute funniest part of this whole thing was that after Irene, my wife was neutral at-best, about buying any generator at all.

After the Derencho, she was the one on the phone looking for hotel rooms... I almost fell of the coach with laughter when I saw the look on her face when she was told a room at the Best Western was going to cost $600 for the night.
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Old 07-19-2012, 10:51 PM   #21
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Regarding gasoline:

I live in the country, so gas is not piped in. To install any type of natural gas generator, I would have needed to have had a propane tank installed, fill it up, and let it sit there unused, perhaps for years, until the next catastrophe. So it really only made sense for me to go with a gasoline generator.

When I bought a bigger generator after Irene (a portable, 7KW), my dealer told me to put two years of stabilizer in the gas. He said that his experience with the engines on the brand I bought (Robin Subaru) is that their engines are very reliable, and that old, stabilized gas will still work after a year.

In any case, I keep 35 or 40 gallons of gas in my barn for the generator. I put two years worth of stabilizer in the gas, and buy 89 instead of 87, because I've heard that the stabilizer can reduce the octane a smidgen. I date the gas cans with the fill up date. My computer reminds me to run the generator once a month, and I usually do a brief test run on it more often than that.

For me, the big advantage of gas is that I can use it in other devices. I use the gas in my snowblower and lawn mowers, and if I have any old gas remaining after six months, I dump it 5 gallons at a time into our cars. In that way, I can always have a fresh supply of gas for my generator. Propane and diesel would have to be reserved for the generator - I have no other use for them.

Yes, it would be a pain to get gas if all power was out for 50 miles, but that didn't even happen during Hurricane Irene, the worst hurricane to hit our area in 120 years.

As a side note, during Hurricane Irene, those with propane generators where I live emptied their tanks after about three days, and the trucks were unable to get to their homes to fill them, because there were no truck passable roads to many houses. People were able to get gasoline in via ATV's in most cases. I guess there is never an energy source that is going to be available during all types of emergencies.

Is anyone buying stock in generator manufacturers? They always seem to be out of stock these days, and we keep getting hit with bizarre power-knocking-out natural disasters in places that have never seen them before.

Last edited by Arnold Ziffel; 07-19-2012 at 11:18 PM.
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Old 07-19-2012, 11:13 PM   #22
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.... Global Warming?

As far as stail fuel goes... I keep up to 15 gallons around and use in riding mower, line trimmer, pressure washer and what ever other small engines there are around the house. Though this generator has 16 gallon tank I really don't expect to have all the fuel on hand when a blackout actually hits. More likely I'd only have a couple gallons available.

As far weird weather.... Man... It really is something else this season. :/

Last edited by ngcreese; 07-19-2012 at 11:22 PM.
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Old 07-19-2012, 11:36 PM   #23
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Arnold...what do you do for heat? No gas? Is it all electric?
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Old 07-20-2012, 06:34 AM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Arnold Ziffel View Post
Regarding gasoline:

I live in the country, so gas is not piped in. To install any type of natural gas generator, I would have needed to have had a propane tank installed, fill it up, and let it sit there unused, perhaps for years, until the next catastrophe. So it really only made sense for me to go with a gasoline generator.
I understand your predicament but man that is a lot of gas to be jockeying around, like an extra chore for life. I'm of the opinion that a back-up generator is nice for the escentials and a little comfort during an outage. I would think a large enough propane tank used sparingly would get a person through the most severe power outages without needing a refill.
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Old 07-20-2012, 09:33 AM   #25
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Arnold...what do you do for heat? No gas? Is it all electric?
I have two oil-forced hot air furnaces, with both tanks in the basement, plus a woodstove. In a winter emergency, the woodstove will heat most of the ground floor, although surprisingly, my generator seems to be able to power the two furnaces plus refigerators and other bare essentials without overstraining it. Because of the woodstove, we can get by with one or at times no furnaces on during the winter.
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Old 07-20-2012, 11:50 AM   #26
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I understand your predicament but man that is a lot of gas to be jockeying around, like an extra chore for life. I'm of the opinion that a back-up generator is nice for the escentials and a little comfort during an outage. I would think a large enough propane tank used sparingly would get a person through the most severe power outages without needing a refill.
You're probably right that the propane tank would take me through most emergencies, but I was too cheap (wife didn't want to spend the money I spent for the portable generator as it was) to install a propane tank and pay to fill it. It would be an additional expense, and the propane would not be used by anything but the generator. I'm not sure about upkeep, but I figured that a propane tank that sat for long periods might require periodic maintenance. I. One more thing that could go wrong when the power did go out. I could be wrong.

Managing 7 gas cans isn't that big a deal, and as I said, I use the gas for other things. Right now, I'm using a few gallons a week between lawn mowers and a pump we're using to take water out of the river and water the grass we needed to replant when Hurricane Irene turned the 1 acre field behind my house into a giant sandbox and boulder pit.
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Old 07-20-2012, 04:10 PM   #27
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You lease a LP tank, therefore maintainence is taken care of by the supplier. When your oil furnaces need replacement you should consider the LP route. Much cleaner.
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Old 07-24-2012, 03:11 PM   #28
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Guys thanks again for you input on my project. I've kicked off building the shed. Paver base, followed by course gravel foundation is in. 2x6 Shed floor boards with half inch spaces between them sitting atop a pair of 4x4s is done. Walls are framed.

For electrical I went with a 15 foot 6/4 50 amp cable with an l14-50 plug head at one end and a c6364 twist lock connector at the other end. Will be mounting a CS6365 50 amp inlet box inside the shed. Connecting to the inlet box and running along / tacked to my fence line will by 6/3 UF-B cable, into my basement and connected to my transfer switches.
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Old 08-23-2012, 08:13 AM   #29
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Guys thanks for the wiring advice! Here's some pics from my Generator Shed project...


My 78 year old dad came up from Florida to help with the heavy lifting...


Happened to discuss wiring with my brother in-law, who owns a Solar Power company in CA... and we was like, "You NEED to bury those lines...." So... 18" deep and 10feet long trench was dug (...by pop!) I laid the 2" PVC. #6 and #10 THWN wires were pulled through.



The fiberglass insulation and a gable vent fan help with the cooling. Not shown, is the secondary muffler and flexible wrapped exhaust piping.


Early testing of the flexible stainless steel piping and the secondary muffler. Wow, what a difference in exhaust noise reduction!



Roof and generator in place... both tasks ended up needing two people to get 'er done... thanks again pop!



Weather resistant external power outlet installed...



Weather resistant 240V, 50Amp inlet, along with additional power outlets (for trickle charging the starter battery...).



Closer shot of the wiring... You can see the wrapped exhaust tubing better in this shot. I'll be putting some more distance between it and the wiring, along with putting some additional aluminum soffet venting between the piping and any wood nearby...

Last thing todo is cut and hang the doors... just in time for Hurricane season here in MD...


Last edited by ngcreese; 08-23-2012 at 08:59 AM.
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Old 08-23-2012, 03:10 PM   #30
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That setup looks very nice. You should be in good shape for the next hurricane, derecho, snowmageddon etc.

The only small thing I see wrong is that the wires coming out of the ground in the LB should be run in conduit of some sort all the way to the inlet box and the outlet box. You could use flexibile liquidtight or maybe even ent tubing to do that.

I would also keep a close eye on the temperature in there while it is running. A outdoor thermometer insdie there would help with that. You might even consider a termal switch wired in series with the low oil shutoff system which would protect the generator from cooking itself to death if the fan failed.

Aside from those little nitpicks, it looks like a very professional job and should serve you well.


Last edited by Auger01; 08-23-2012 at 03:12 PM.
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