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-   -   Garage/Workshop Receptacles (http://www.diychatroom.com/f18/garage-workshop-receptacles-18429/)

mr500 03-12-2008 11:28 PM

Garage/Workshop Receptacles
 
What does it say in the code book about GFIC in a workshop. I plan on running 3 circuits for plugs. 1 down each side wall and one across the back wall. Do I need 3 GFIC, 1 on each run? How exactly does that play out with the code.

Also, are they they be connected at the start of the run OR in the middle, or does it matter as long as they are there and working??

Mike

mr500 03-12-2008 11:32 PM

oops Thats GFCI

InPhase277 03-13-2008 01:22 AM

Only receptacles in a residential garage need to be GFCI protected, not a workshop. Unless the receptacle is within 6' of a sink. Otherwise, it would be permissible to use standard outlets at your work bench. However, I would still recommend using GFCIs. Install them at the first outlet on the circuit, and protect the rest downstream.

InPhase277

CowboyAndy 03-13-2008 06:40 AM

So what is the criteria for something to NOT be a residential garage? What if I turn my garage into a workshop and don't park my car in there? Is it still a garage? What if it is an outbuilding that has a garage door, but has never been used as a garage but more of a workshop? Is GFI protection still required?

Speedy Petey 03-13-2008 07:11 AM

They are required in a workshop, shed, potting shed, outhouse, pump house, etc, as well.

210.8 Ground-Fault Circuit-Interrupter Protection for Personnel

(A) Dwelling Units
All 125-volt, single-phase, 15- and 20-ampere receptacles installed in the locations specified in (1) through (8) shall have ground-fault circuit-interrupter protection for personnel.

(2) Garages, and also accessory buildings that have a floor located at or below grade level not intended as habitable rooms and limited to storage areas, work areas, and areas of similar use

jbfan 03-13-2008 09:22 AM

I have 3 circuits to my garage/workshop, and have a gfci at the begining of each circuit. I have only tripped a gfci in the shop one time.

jrclen 03-13-2008 12:17 PM

You can install GFCI circuit breakers on each of those 3 circuits. Or install a GFCI receptacle outlet in the 1st location in each circuit and connect the down stream receptacles to the load terminals of that GFCI to protect those receptacle outlets. Wiring them incorrectly gives you no protection.

CowboyAndy 03-13-2008 12:19 PM

Quick question, is there a limit as to how mant receps a gfi recep can protect?

jrclen 03-13-2008 05:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CowboyAndy (Post 107271)
Quick question, is there a limit as to how mant receps a gfi recep can protect?

No limit

mr500 03-13-2008 05:50 PM

Ughh. Kinda wish I would have bought the GFi breakers instead of regular ones. But then, they came with the panel as a package deal lol. Not that I cant wire the plugs in, just easier to pop in a breaker.



This stuff gets expensive fast don't it

Mike

jrclen 03-13-2008 08:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mr500 (Post 107383)
Ughh. Kinda wish I would have bought the GFi breakers instead of regular ones. But then, they came with the panel as a package deal lol. Not that I cant wire the plugs in, just easier to pop in a breaker.

This stuff gets expensive fast don't it
Mike

Yes it can get expensive in a hurry. And the GFCI breakers can be pricey also. The GFCI receptacles will do the job just fine.

mr500 03-13-2008 09:34 PM

I guess GFCI plugs is what it will be. Ill put one on each line. rather spend that money and not burn something up.

Thanks

Mike

mr500 03-13-2008 09:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jrclen (Post 107381)
No limit


I had one "electrician" make a comment that if you put too many plugs after a GFIC, one might get pre mature tripping? ANYONE ever heard of this? :eek:

Speedy Petey 03-14-2008 07:08 AM

Yes, I have.
There is no legal limit, just like residential receptacles on a circuit, but there is common sense limit.
Grounded outlets, especially receptacles, have a certain amount of "leakage" to ground. This is normal. Add up too many and it is enough to nuisance trip a GFI.

CowboyAndy 03-14-2008 07:18 AM

So what is a "safe" amount?


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