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Old 07-28-2010, 09:45 AM   #1
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Should I put two garage door openers on a dedicated circuit? And if I put them on a circuit protected by a gfci upstream, would they cause much nuisance tripping? Thanks
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Old 07-28-2010, 09:48 AM   #2
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If I had space for a dedicated breaker I would do it.

GFI protection is required under the 2008 NEC. Tripping should not be an issue. I would however put the GFI where I could reset it without needing a ladder if it were to trip.
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Old 07-28-2010, 02:30 PM   #3
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Regarding it "tripping"....dont think it would be a problem. However, I would prefer them on seperate cct's. Simply for the fact that if the cct trips one day (maybe from a problem NOT located in the garage) at least u still have the 2nd door powered up and working normally.

my 2 cents
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Old 07-28-2010, 05:01 PM   #4
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Yup, I'm going to install my doors on 2 seperate circuits
That way if one kicks out I can still open the other door
I'll locate GFCI's where I can reach them, then the load side will feed outlets on the ceiling
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Old 07-29-2010, 12:42 PM   #5
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I read elsewhere that an NEC table claims a 1/2 hp motor draws 9.8 A at 120V. A single 20A circuit could handle two openers but 3/4 hp motors are becoming more popular. (I just installed one on my other garage door and like it much better!) Upon further reflection, I should probably split my openers onto 2 circuits...

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Old 07-29-2010, 03:15 PM   #6
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I'd think motors have a generic exemption to GFCI protection because the normal capacitance from the motor windings to the motor shell [ground lead] causes several mA to flow.
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Old 07-29-2010, 03:30 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yoyizit View Post
I'd think motors have a generic exemption to GFCI protection because the normal capacitance from the motor windings to the motor shell [ground lead] causes several mA to flow.
So what are you trying to say? That we shouldn't follow the NEC because you think motors are exempt?
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Old 07-29-2010, 03:35 PM   #8
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Quote:
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I'd think motors have a generic exemption to GFCI protection because the normal capacitance from the motor windings to the motor shell [ground lead] causes several mA to flow.
There is no exception under the 2008 NEC for the GFI protection.

Also UL has limits on acceptable motor leakage that is about 1/10 of the trip level of a GFI.
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Old 07-29-2010, 03:38 PM   #9
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So what are you trying to say? That would shouldn't follow the NEC because you think motors are exempt?
There was a guy, possibly on this forum, who had his washing machine tripping a GFCI. After a very lengthy thread the OP said that the manuf. confirmed that his machine was exempt.

Last edited by Yoyizit; 07-29-2010 at 04:36 PM.
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Old 07-29-2010, 04:31 PM   #10
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Quote:
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There was a guy, possibly on this forum, who had his washing machine tripping a GFCI. After a very lengthy thread the manuf. confirmed that his machine was exempt.
I find it hard to believe that the washer was exempt from the UL standard or that someone paid extra to get their machine listed under a different standard. Show me the proof.
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Old 07-29-2010, 05:00 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yoyizit View Post
There was a guy, possibly on this forum, who had his washing machine tripping a GFCI. After a very lengthy thread the OP said that the manuf. confirmed that his machine was exempt.
The manufacturer is in no way, shape, or form an authority to make that determination.

It's like a Black and Decker saying that I could plug one of their toasters into a 50amp circuit wired with 18 gauge zip cord.

The exemption for garage door openers is no longer in the NEC (as far as 2008), what a manufacturer said over the phone does not change that.
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Old 07-29-2010, 05:12 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Proby View Post
The exemption for garage door openers is no longer in the NEC (as far as 2008)
Did the NEC give a rationale for removing this exemption?

In general, are the reasons for NEC decisions available anywhere on the Net?

Just curious. Very curious.
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Old 07-29-2010, 05:15 PM   #13
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Quote:
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Did the NEC give a rationale for removing this exemption?

In general, are the reasons for NEC decisions available anywhere on the Net?

Just curious. Very curious.
Join Mike Holt's forums, they got all the answers you'll need
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Old 07-29-2010, 05:16 PM   #14
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Seems like the motor technology has changed
http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&s...=&oq=&gs_rfai=
and not the GFCI technology.

The code violation questions/articles in the back of EC & M are the closest I'd like to get to Mr. Holt and his gang. . .

And, for some Holt gossip, it seems that a former member of their forum who was subsequently banned is probably the same person who sued his high school for the right to pass out Creationist literature. And won.

Last edited by Yoyizit; 07-29-2010 at 05:28 PM.
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Old 07-29-2010, 05:59 PM   #15
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When I wired my garage four summers ago, I put all the outlets on GFCIs (of course). I have yet to have a ground fault. I've run a table saw with a 3/4H.P. 60+ year old motor, a band saw, skil saws, a drill press, air compressors, wire feeds, and numerous other portable 120V tools. I can't see where ground faults are a problem with motors.
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