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Old 04-11-2013, 07:13 PM   #1
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Fuses in stove actually blow up!


Got an old 1950's RCA Victor Hot Range stove - apparently it was working up until 5 years ago and has been in storage since. I replaced the fuses in them with the exact same that were in there because nothing was working. Two of the elements now work fine. The oven doesnt work and two of the other elements actually blew up the fuses - I mean the top blew right off.

My question - is this a normal blown fuse that just happen to blow the glass top right off or is something else going on here? I've never seen a fuse just break in half. The fuses I put in the stove were brand new. I read that a faulty element can cause the fuse to 'blow'.

Second question - How do I get the broken fuse out?

Thanks to all for reading and thanks in advance for any advice!

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Old 04-11-2013, 07:42 PM   #2
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Fuses in stove actually blow up!


I had a shorted eliment blow the pot off the stove, the door on the breaker panel flew open and the breaker exploded.
It's a dead 220 volt short.

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Old 04-11-2013, 10:22 PM   #3
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Fuses in stove actually blow up!


Definitely a dead short. Don't test it again until you've identified the problem and are confident you actually solved it. The controls may be damaged from the fault current, too.
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Old 04-11-2013, 10:32 PM   #4
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Fuses in stove actually blow up!


Sorry, I should have explained the set up a bit better. The stove is wired directly from its box/circuit breaker. Meaning the cable comes straight from the box and into the stove - there's no outlet. The fuses I was talking about are the fuses in the stove and not the box. Two of the elements work just fine, even after the other two elements blew their fuses (in the stove).

So a dead short (from my understanding) would not be the problem here, no? Isn't a dead short usually involve the main wire from the box and not the appliance? Just asking.
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Old 04-11-2013, 10:35 PM   #5
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Fuses in stove actually blow up!


You have " bolted " 240 volt short circuit so you will have to take the look at the wiring harness and all the conductors to make sure they are not damaged.

As far for the control devices I belive they are pretty much done for it when you have hard short circuit there.

What kind of fuse ya refering to the screw in type or cartage fuse ?



Or



Note: there is serveral size to use and to replace you have to match what it was in the exsting format.

That will make the differnce on how to remove and replace it.

Merci,
Marc
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Old 04-11-2013, 10:36 PM   #6
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Fuses in stove actually blow up!


Quote:
Originally Posted by joecaption View Post
I had a shorted eliment blow the pot off the stove, the door on the breaker panel flew open and the breaker exploded.
It's a dead 220 volt short.
Just a kind reminder it is NOT 220 actually it is 240 volts for correction on ya.

Merci,
Marc
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Old 04-11-2013, 10:45 PM   #7
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Fuses in stove actually blow up!


It's the standard screw type fuses that stoves use. As I said, half the stove works fine which would mean that the problem isn't in the main fuse box but somewhere in the stove.

The main wire comes into the stove (two hots and a ground) and those are fine. Again, I don't think the problem would be here because the entire stove would be affected and not just two elements.

Anyone have any opinions as to whether a faulty element can cause a short and a blown fuse? Would having an improper fuse amperage in the stove cause this? I merely replaced the fuses with the same type that were in there before, perhaps some of those were wrong also.
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Old 04-11-2013, 10:59 PM   #8
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Fuses in stove actually blow up!


The only time I do ever see the screw in fuse used for auxlary receptale it will be in the front of the stove somewhere so therefore somewhere along that circuit is comperised.

I know I did used have old GE stove it was simair to the old style RCA stove and the plug fuse was used for the receptale and light on the panel that was about it.

The rest of the burner circuit is protected by the larger range fuse or breaker so that is the only protection you will have.

So if you don't have two burner come on at all so pretty much the control dail or button is done for it.

You can able check for short circuit but you will have to pry the burner lid cover up to see what is going on ( one serious warning turn the power supply to the stove off first before you get into this part )

Merci,
Marc
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Old 04-11-2013, 11:38 PM   #9
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Fuses in stove actually blow up!


Thanks! It's an old stove so I figure there can't be too much wrong with it. It's at the cottage so I just had a bit of time to play around with it but I'm going back there this weekend. All in all the stove uses 11 fuses. There's one light (maybe one in the oven too - I didn't check), four burners and of course - the oven. All the fuses are accessible by a lower front panel.

The dials definitely work on the two burners the short out. I tested out the burner after it blew the fuse by...replacing the fuse and during the dial on. As soon as the burner goes on the fuse blows.
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Old 04-11-2013, 11:42 PM   #10
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Fuses in stove actually blow up!


Quote:
Originally Posted by meneermalik View Post
Thanks! It's an old stove so I figure there can't be too much wrong with it. It's at the cottage so I just had a bit of time to play around with it but I'm going back there this weekend. All in all the stove uses 11 fuses. There's one light (maybe one in the oven too - I didn't check), four burners and of course - the oven. All the fuses are accessible by a lower front panel.

The dials definitely work on the two burners the short out. I tested out the burner after it blew the fuse by...replacing the fuse and during the dial on. As soon as the burner goes on the fuse blows.
As far you know which burner cause the fuse to blow out you will have to trace that circuit to see if anything causing a short even bad heating element can do the same thing.

I am not too suprised with the age of the old stove more likey one of the conductors ( wire ) is allready brittle and if you move them they can crack open up so the only way you can fix them is use the appalice rated conductors ( do not use the orinarly household conductors they are not rated to work in very hot spot if you do they will short out as soon the insluating materals melt down.)


But some case it may be a good time to get a better stove to replace the old one due some case you may not able find the parts anymore.
Merci,
Marc
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Old 04-12-2013, 12:10 AM   #11
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Fuses in stove actually blow up!


This stove obviously has some hard shorts in it !
Could be elements or wiring.
Get the stove megger tested !
This willl reveal if it is the elements or
the internal wiring.
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Old 04-12-2013, 12:15 AM   #12
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Fuses in stove actually blow up!


I figured I'd do it the old fashion way. Replace one of the elements that I know blows a fuse with one that I know works. If the fuse doesnt blow and the element works then case solved. If it still blows the fuse then I guess I gotta start looking at the wiring inside the stove.

I read that stoves use 20amp fuses for the elements and this is a general rule, is this true? Would having an improper amp cause it to blow?
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Old 04-12-2013, 12:19 AM   #13
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Fuses in stove actually blow up!


Quote:
Originally Posted by meneermalik View Post
I figured I'd do it the old fashion way. Replace one of the elements that I know blows a fuse with one that I know works. If the fuse doesnt blow and the element works then case solved. If it still blows the fuse then I guess I gotta start looking at the wiring inside the stove.

I read that stoves use 20amp fuses for the elements and this is a general rule, is this true? Would having an improper amp cause it to blow?
It been very long time if I did recall the fuse rating but I know the small burners useally run on 15 amp fuse but larger burners useally go either 15 or 20 amp ( the supply voltage will affect this part )

But a good simple test is use the DVM and with the power off and disconnect the conductors from burners and check for line to ground fault with a hard short circuit it will show up with DVM.

Techallywise It will be a good time to check the conductors for any other damage as well.

Merci,
Marc
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Old 04-12-2013, 12:20 AM   #14
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Fuses in stove actually blow up!


Quote:
Originally Posted by meneermalik View Post
I figured I'd do it the old fashion way. Replace one of the elements that I know blows a fuse with one that I know works. If the fuse doesnt blow and the element works then case solved. If it still blows the fuse then I guess I gotta start looking at the wiring inside the stove.

I read that stoves use 20amp fuses for the elements and this is a general rule, is this true? Would having an improper amp cause it to blow?

NO !

The fact that the fuses blow so viololatly
says you have a good old fashioned short circuit,
known as a "hard short".
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Old 04-12-2013, 12:12 PM   #15
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Fuses in stove actually blow up!


Quote:
Originally Posted by joecaption View Post
I had a shorted eliment blow the pot off the stove, the door on the breaker panel flew open and the breaker exploded.
It's a dead 220 volt short.
Holy crap! Where's the smiley with a brown stain in his pants when you need it?

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