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Old 12-31-2011, 06:23 PM   #1
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"fused on both sides"


I'm planning to install a new cooktop, and the instructions say to connect a 40-amp circuit fused on both sides of the line. What does "fused on both sides of the line" mean?

I understand that I need a separate circuit, 4 or 3-wire (I'll use 4), 8-gauge wire and 40 amp breaker. The oven that was removed was connected to a 40 amp breaker/circuit, so I should be able to use what is in place ( but may replace wire since it is 50-60 yrs old).

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Old 12-31-2011, 06:28 PM   #2
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"fused on both sides"


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Originally Posted by ddrayson View Post
I'm planning to install a new cooktop, and the instructions say to connect a 40-amp circuit fused on both sides of the line. What does "fused on both sides of the line" mean?

I understand that I need a separate circuit, 4 or 3-wire (I'll use 4), 8-gauge wire and 40 amp breaker. The oven that was removed was connected to a 40 amp breaker/circuit, so I should be able to use what is in place ( but may replace wire since it is 50-60 yrs old).
I assume it means both hots are fused/breakered.

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Old 12-31-2011, 06:31 PM   #3
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"fused on both sides"


Double pole breaker connected to both hots lines. The neutral and ground do not get fused.
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Old 01-01-2012, 01:26 AM   #4
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"fused on both sides"


On the 120v mains system,
To get the 240v required by your cooktop/stove
you need 2 X hots, cause 2 x 120 =240.
So both hots or sides need to be protected !
fuses are not recomended,
cause if one blows but not the other,
back feeding will occur.
This is why they use two breakers linked together.
When one blows the other is shut off also !
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Old 01-01-2012, 03:36 AM   #5
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"fused on both sides"


"Fused both sides" just means that both hot conductors must have overcurrent protection. This is a code requirement anyways, and you'd have a hard time installing a circuit from a modern breaker panel that isn't. You must use a 4-wire circuit, though. 3-wire feeds for appliances that require a neutral connection have been a code violation for many years now. Only existing installations are grandfathered.
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