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Old 01-16-2009, 11:16 AM   #1
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flux and corrosion question???


I wasn't sure which area to post this in, since it's a general question about the affects of flux, but I thought there would be enough people in this area that are worried about corrosion.

I work in lab and we're trying to coat some stuff with a low melting point solder that we've made on sight. We can only get the solder to wet well when we use a flux with it. The issue is that I'm concerned about what affect the flux has on the brass that we're soldering with it. What I mean is the flux between the solder and the brass. Does this stuff just burn off and do nothing? Or, does it stay on the material and can this cause corrosion beneath the solder?

I ask this because I know to always clean off the excess flux after soldering, but what about the stuff that's underneath?

Many thanks in advance.

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Old 01-16-2009, 12:03 PM   #2
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flux and corrosion question???


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Originally Posted by niqolas619 View Post
I wasn't sure which area to post this in, since it's a general question about the affects of flux, but I thought there would be enough people in this area that are worried about corrosion.

I work in lab and we're trying to coat some stuff with a low melting point solder that we've made on sight. We can only get the solder to wet well when we use a flux with it. The issue is that I'm concerned about what affect the flux has on the brass that we're soldering with it. What I mean is the flux between the solder and the brass. Does this stuff just burn off and do nothing? Or, does it stay on the material and can this cause corrosion beneath the solder?

I ask this because I know to always clean off the excess flux after soldering, but what about the stuff that's underneath?

Many thanks in advance.
Not really sure, but I believe the flux is evaporated by the heat of the solder, and any that isn't is likely displaced. In other words, there is no flux between the solder and the material, otherwise it would be a weak joint. Millions of electrical and plumbing connections are held together with solder with no problems. What is it that you are soldering that concerns you about corrosion?

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Old 01-16-2009, 01:35 PM   #3
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flux and corrosion question???


InPhase277 is correct. I worked in electronics for 30 years, and we used rosin core flux almost exclusively.
The flux burns off way below the melting point of solder, so there is none in the solder or between the solder and the surface being soldered.

Most rosin core fluxes do not cause corrosion, but an acid flux will.
You should be OK with just using a flux remover after the job is done.
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Old 01-16-2009, 01:54 PM   #4
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flux and corrosion question???


flux is used as a lubricant to allow the solder to flow into the connection. It will not harm anything if properly applied. Many poor connections are made by applying too much flux. This makes for a weak joint which will eventually fail.
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