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Old 05-24-2012, 05:58 AM   #16
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Fluorescent light on garage door?


I think Jack's idea is your only valid option....I just looked at the pic of your door....no windows.....

One of the issues of having a light on the door is the cord...which usually ends up getting caught in something....
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Old 05-24-2012, 08:42 AM   #17
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Fluorescent light on garage door?


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Many of the t-8 tombstones have a twist in / locking device to hold the bulbs. They won't easily fall out, but a 4' piece of glass is easy to break. If I was going to do it I would use the protective sleeves and wire a plug to the fixture so it can be unplugged when not in use or when the door is to be moved. I wouldn't chance a cord flexing with each door operation. (but I like the dock light idea better)
I checked out those protective sleeves, they look pretty good. Also found a place that makes clips for the bulb itself but did not see anything for locking the sockets.

Oh yes I will be using an extension core with a plug. My thinking is it would start at the ceiling about 4' from the front of the garage, then to the top of the door and then down to a clamp at the lamps.
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Old 05-24-2012, 08:47 AM   #18
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Fluorescent light on garage door?


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I checked out those protective sleeves, they look pretty good. Also found a place that makes clips for the bulb itself but did not see anything for locking the sockets.
The sockets I refer to are primarily on T-8 fixtures. The socket itself rotates with the bulb and clicks in at 90 deg. which automatically positions the lamp and also prevents it from falling out.
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Old 05-26-2012, 09:33 AM   #19
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Fluorescent light on garage door?


Despite some good advice on why putting lights on a moving door is not a good idea, Puttster goes ahead. I hope he does not come back and ask how to do fuel gas piping
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Old 05-26-2012, 09:39 AM   #20
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Fluorescent light on garage door?


given a choice of a moving light with/without extension cord id rather have this

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Old 03-19-2013, 11:45 PM   #21
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Fluorescent light on garage door?


Follow up here.... went with sockets and individual bulbs for light. Worked out great, perfect height for shining down under the hood.

Used an in-line switch, here is a video.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ibBS2...ature=youtu.be

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Old 03-20-2013, 10:10 AM   #22
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Fluorescent light on garage door?


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Originally Posted by puttster View Post
Follow up here.... went with sockets and individual bulbs for light. Worked out great, perfect height for shining down under the hood.

Used an in-line switch, here is a video.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ibBS2...ature=youtu.be

puttster
I only see a few problems hear, and possibly some bad ones.

1. Zip cord is not made for frequent flexing. I would have used SOOW, or at the very least SJOOW cord that is made for flexing and usually used on items like vacuum cleaners and power tools, even high bay lights that swing back and forth.

2. Zip cord= Not grounded. You should've grounded the fixture, especially if it's metal and on a metal garage door. If the fixture shorts out, then your gonna have a nice 120v bite waiting for you or the next victim that touches and connected metal nearby.

3. With the way the wire is, it looks like it could get pinched or wear out on the hooks. Especially the zip cord that has no outer overall jacket. It only has 1 piece of insulation for both conductors.

Really, if this were my garage. I would've just used a halogen work light on a tripod. 500w halogen will make everything under the hood show. Shadows? No problem. Add another one on the opposite side. The work lights are cheap at $35 a pop. Adjustable height and tilt. If you don't need both on each tripod, they have a separate switch on each fixture.

http://www.homedepot.com/p/Workforce...9#.UUnRNhyHuSo
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Old 03-20-2013, 10:55 AM   #23
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Fluorescent light on garage door?


Thanks for your review, Sean. When I do some mods I will follow your advice. Re the grounding: the lights are low wattage flourescents, do you think an in line fuse would be a good idea? Or maybe there is a switch with a fuse built-in?

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Old 03-20-2013, 11:25 AM   #24
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Fluorescent light on garage door?


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Thanks for your review, Sean. When I do some mods I will follow your advice. Re the grounding: the lights are low wattage flourescents, do you think an in line fuse would be a good idea? Or maybe there is a switch with a fuse built-in?

puttster

Grounding is always a must, with most metal products. Doesn't matter what is connected to it. It's not for the device safety, it's for yours.

If you'd like to put an inline fuse in, sure, go ahead. It ain't gonna hurt. I'm not sure if they sell one that has a switch, but all connections have to be in a rated J-box. Which means, no, you can't just "open air splice" and inline fuse on. It has to be in a junction box closed up.

Make sure the wiring for the light is also in an appropriate junction box, usually for applications like this or where used with a flex cord, an outdoor weatherproof junction box it used, where all holes are sealed up (if its metal, ground it).

Make sure the cord also has a strain relief. Not a "NM cable" connector. But a compression/watertight strain relief. You may see those around on drop boxes in some stores. Those are more made for periodic movement. They look like this:


Also, try to plug the unit into a GFCI outlet for extra protection against a short. If you can't change out the outlet because of a fridge or garage door opener plugged in, they sell plug in GFCI units.

I don't mean to raise the costs for you of this project. But, it should be done in a safe way. Is this project to code? No, not really. In the end, is it going to at least be safe? Well, if you follow common sense, wire it correctly, and use the right items, hopefully yes........but that all depends on your part. No one here can babysit how it is put together and see every bit of detail as you work on it. Let's say you put it together fine and the cord gets pinched on the garage door, or wears out prematurely on the hook. *Poof-Zap*. Well, things happen. And mounting a light like this on a door, with that kinda cord arrangement isn't a normal wiring procedure, nor is it very......."Safe"

Flexible cord really isn't allowed for permanent use. But, there is always a debate over this. And the type of cable does have it's use. They're used sometimes for drop boxes, hanging light fixtures, etc. Anywhere that it is moved frequently.

Personally, I would've just mounted a strip light on the door with bulb covers, a hook for the cord when not used, and plugged it in when needed and called it a day. Or used halogen tripod lights. But, since we've already gone this far......
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Old 03-20-2013, 12:01 PM   #25
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Fluorescent light on garage door?


Imade the electrical box initially with a recepticle, so I could plug the extension cord into it on an "as needed" basis. But I did not like the look of the plug on both ends of the zip cord. I am interested in safety! Only alternative I could think of was an in-line switch.
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Old 03-20-2013, 12:59 PM   #26
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Fluorescent light on garage door?


I have done this before, and while not "normal", it isn't that big a deal. I bought a (actually two) fixture with a wrap around lens that totally encloses the lamps. I used a trouble light reel attached just about where the garage door opener is. I attached the cable to the top of the upper door panel, and then ran it straight down to the fixtures. Do not clamp the cable anywhere except at the top of the door and at the fixture entry.

I mounted the fixtures where I wanted, wired everything up, and then took zip ties and installed them around the bulbs and fixture. Don't tighten them too tight, just tight enough so the lamps don't want to rotate out of the tombstones (they probably won't anyway, but it's just a little insurance). I then installed the wrap around lens, and secured the lens to the fixture with four screws into the sheet metal.

I had that setup for about six years, and never even replaced a bulb. Those two lights were on a separate switch (actually a switched receptacle in the ceiling) so they were not used all the time. The wrap around lens is nice for normal physical protection, and it would contain the lamps if for some reason they did break loose from the sockets, though mine never did.

I dismantled the setup before I sold the house and turned the cord reel into a hanging receptacle.

Professional disclaimer: Don't try this at home. Yes, this is a bit unorthodox, it looks weird, and it would never meet any NEC codes or UL listings.... but sometimes you just gotta do what you gotta do.
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