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-   -   Fishing Cable (http://www.diychatroom.com/f18/fishing-cable-173335/)

sirsparksalot 03-01-2013 08:16 PM

Fishing Cable
 
Guys, please take a look at this article, and tell me what you think about the method he's using to run the cable horizontally across the wall studs by notching the studs.

My thought is that this has to be too close to the drywall (or edge of the studs) to be safe from someone sometime opening the wall and cutting into the cable.

http://www.familyhandyman.com/DIY-Pr...-By-Step#step1

EDITED: Actually, step 5 (or photo 5) is what I'm concerned with.

k_buz 03-01-2013 08:28 PM

Hack, but legal.

sirsparksalot 03-01-2013 08:42 PM

Hard to believe. I mean I know we run 'em perpendicular through holes, but then we drill 'em 1/2" back. This run seems awful close for my comfort.

Well anyway, the reason I ask is I have to do the same thing as in the article, with a ceiling light fixture and a switch drop, so what would be a better way? I don't want to duplicate this guy's work.

EDIT: BTW no attic access for me.

silversport 03-01-2013 09:05 PM

I would (and have many times) cut out bigger sections of drywall so that holes can be drilled.

joed 03-01-2013 09:09 PM

Because he uses the nail plates it is legal. But how does he fit the drywall piece back. The hole is solid metal, no place to put a screw.

k_buz 03-01-2013 09:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by joed (Post 1127858)
because he uses the nail plates it is legal. But how does he fit the drywall piece back. The hole is solid metal, no place to put a screw.


pl500

sirsparksalot 03-01-2013 09:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by joed (Post 1127858)
Because he uses the nail plates it is legal. But how does he fit the drywall piece back. The hole is solid metal, no place to put a screw.

Joel, Yeah, I didn't even consider that, but he could probably use one of those 4x4 or 6x6 drywall patches.

But to the main point, even using nail plates, the cable is still, imo, subject to damage, being ran so close to the edge. I'm suggesting that if, in the future, someone wanted to use a keyhole saw to open the drywall, for whatever reason, or even to hang a picture (I know it's quite low on the wall, but still), the cable will definitely get damaged.

Dorado 03-01-2013 10:11 PM

The article should recommend leaving slack between studs or making the notches extra wide so the cable has a better chance of being pushed away from a cutting tool. And a long custom made nail guard could extend from one stud to another.

Isn't there a rule about not drilling through a stud too close to the edge? I remember there was something you can't drill through too close to the edge. A notch like that seems like it would violate that rule.

k_buz 03-02-2013 05:33 AM

You guys are overthinking this. Look at it this way. When you fish a wire vertically in a stud space, how do you control where the wire lays?

J. V. 03-02-2013 11:03 AM

Repairing drywall does not require a stud anyway. Cut a piece to fit. Screw a 1x1 behind the board so it is longer than the board. (sticks out of the sides).
Put piece into wall and screw into the board sticking out the sides.
I guess you guys never punched a hole in the wall?................LOL

jbfan 03-02-2013 07:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by J. V. (Post 1128180)
Repairing drywall does not require a stud anyway. Cut a piece to fit. Screw a 1x1 behind the board so it is longer than the board. (sticks out of the sides).
Put piece into wall and screw into the board sticking out the sides.
I guess you guys never punched a hole in the wall?................LOL

A big hole is easier to patch than a small hole.

When I have to cross a ceiling, I try to cut a hole on every other joist,
That way I can drill from both sides.

jcrack_corn 03-02-2013 11:55 PM

that article is more than stupid, it is just wrong.

i takes far more time to chisel the stud away for a notch to run wires, and to cut a sh/t ton of holes.

just do what normal people do, cut out a ~6-8" channel the horizontal length of the run...drill the studs...run the wire, and replace a big ole piece of drywall (6-8" wide by xx feet long) an mud/tape it all to perfection....you were never there.


it is sooo easy to fix those long narrow drywall patches because you can skim the entire area, so all you are doing is feathering the edges.....

sirsparksalot 03-03-2013 12:34 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by k_buz (Post 1127974)
You guys are overthinking this. Look at it this way. When you fish a wire vertically in a stud space, how do you control where the wire lays?

Thanks, k_buz, but you did say hack (and I agree). :yes:

NOW, since I need to do something similar, what's your method, using those same photos?

sirsparksalot 03-03-2013 12:38 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jbfan (Post 1128534)
A big hole is easier to patch than a small hole.

:confused1:

Quote:

Originally Posted by jbfan
When I have to cross a ceiling, I try to cut a hole on every other joist, That way I can drill from both sides.

So you'd drill a big enough hole in order to get a right-angle drill in there? And I was thinking that instead of holes at different heights, I'd just cut across the top of the wall, and two spots on the ceiling. ??

hammerlane 03-03-2013 09:10 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by joed (Post 1127858)
But how does he fit the drywall piece back. The hole is solid metal, no place to put a screw.

Since when have electrician become concerned with making work easier for the drywallers???:laughing::laughing:


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