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Old 08-31-2012, 04:23 PM   #16
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I've never seen one with a tether but is sounds like a good idea if there is a place and chance for the device to roll away. My grill is constrained by the deck rails (it is on a deck upstairs above the generator). No place for it to go, certainly past its 10' flex line. The generator brake is pretty positive. But maybe I'll do a tether sometime. It wouldn't be good if it went over the side of that lower deck. Only a 2 1/2' drop but it would be a bear to get back up. Not to mention the gas leak. But the wheel brake is really good. Probably won't have a power outage for a couple years anyway....

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Any gas grill i've seen has a tether shorter than the flexible gas hookup.

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Old 08-31-2012, 04:28 PM   #17
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It is natural gas provided by Washington Gas utility. Maybe they strip out the H2S? I haven't checked the code here recently but all the houses built when mine was use continuous copper tubing indoors. Connects to black iron mainfolds and appliance terminations with flare fittings. Never had any corrosion issues. Not sure if the code has changed here since I haven't been into any new construction recently.

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What type of gas? LP or natural? LP industry still uses copper tubing. Natural gas industry doesn't. The reason is corrosion. Propane is a byproduct of natural gas. It is stripped of all gases and hydrocarbons but propane. Natural gas is nothing but a mix of hydrocarbons comprised mainly of methane. But one of the other components of natural gas is hydrogen sulphide which is corrosive to copper. So unless you are using LP or "town" gas, there is going to be hydrogen sulphide in your gas.

Paint the black iron.
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Old 08-31-2012, 04:42 PM   #18
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They may. Where I am too much gas is coming straight into the distribution systems from the wells. Wells are supposed to have H2S strippers on them, but many times the owners don't put in the reactant on a regular basis or not at all. Then they will do it when they get caught, but around here, no one is checking. So the gas has a >2ppm concentration of H2S.

If your gas company is using processed pipeline gas, it may very well have enough stripped out of it.

How old is your house? Copper tubing was used in the past for natural gas, but it has been banned my many jurisdictions.
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Old 08-31-2012, 04:52 PM   #19
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House is 15 years old... in Montgomery County MD. Pretty tightly regulated here which for stuff like this is a good thing. I will assume that copper is still OK or there would be thousands of homes with gas leaks and needing new piping.

They seem to be proactive on these things. Another example is treating the water to minimize pinhole leaks in copper water piping. Not so lucky one county up where they aren't so rigorous. I have friends up there with houses my age having water leaks all over. Never heard of any gas issues up there... I think they also have washington Gas.

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They may. Where I am too much gas is coming straight into the distribution systems from the wells. Wells are supposed to have H2S strippers on them, but many times the owners don't put in the reactant on a regular basis or not at all. Then they will do it when they get caught, but around here, no one is checking. So the gas has a >2ppm concentration of H2S.

If your gas company is using processed pipeline gas, it may very well have enough stripped out of it.

How old is your house? Copper tubing was used in the past for natural gas, but it has been banned my many jurisdictions.
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Old 08-31-2012, 05:26 PM   #20
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I found this dicsussion of using copper with nat gas that cites the universal plumbing code. Very interesting... It does mention that copper may not be used if H2S is above a certain limit.

http://www.copper.org/applications/f...ial_copper.pdf
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Old 08-31-2012, 06:50 PM   #21
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Found this in the WSSC Plumbing and Fuel Gas Code which your county has adopted:





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106.2.2.3 Repairs to Gas Piping. Repairs to gas piping shall not be exempt work, and shall require a permit and inspection.

No matter what I or anyone else here thinks, the inspector has the final say.
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Old 08-31-2012, 09:43 PM   #22
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Here it's flared fittings not sweat or compression.
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Old 09-01-2012, 03:48 AM   #23
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No matter what I or anyone else here thinks, the inspector has the final say.
Absolutely not. No inspector ever has the final say on anything. Inspectors are agents of the authority having jurisdiction, which is the municipality that has adopted the relevant code. The municipality has the final say on the adoption of the code. A court of law has the final say on the interpretation of that code.
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Old 09-01-2012, 06:37 AM   #24
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Yes, here indoors it is soft copper with flared fittings to iron manifolds and terminations. I guess full iron piping is also allowed but I haven't seen it.

Reading that article I linked above it says the UPC allows copper pipe and fittings for natural gas if they are high temperature brazed. I assume this is a fire safety issue because a small fire might melt a soft solder joint and make a bad situation worse.

Not sure if the code differentiates between indoors and outdoors here but I will check. I am personally comfortable with my setup since it is outdoors. In theory I could just run a flex rubber hose form the original exterior stub and gas valve to my grill or generator. What I have done is a lot better than that.

But I am going to redo the piping to meet the code when I get a chance. I am thinking galvanized iron would be the way to go and should be pretty easy to put together. I have the tools I need except for a die to cut pipe threads on 3/4" iron pipe for the long runs. A lot of the termination fine work can be done with available threaded nipples and tees.

I am also going to get the proper rubber flex hose. I was going to get one locally but all the box stores have are 1/2" 10 foot length. US Carb has what I need.
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Old 09-01-2012, 07:34 AM   #25
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You cant run galvanized pipe like you mentioned. Just run Black iron. I know your worried about it rusting but there are miles of black pipe run on top of commercial buildings all over with no issues.
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Old 09-01-2012, 07:50 AM   #26
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I've been looking into that issue and the IGFC which my area has adopted does allow galvanized. I also found lots of discussion with strong opinions that galvanized should not be used because the zinc may flake to others that said that was a misconception. In any case the IGFC makes no distinction between the 2. I am going to call the gas company here to see what they say.

Also as I mentioned above the IGFC allows brazing with copper tubing and fittings. But that would be a PITA. I can braze a bit and have done some HVAC work. But don't want to mess with the 10 or so joints I need to do.

Another interesting thing I saw in the IGFC is that press connect fittings that meet ANSI LC-4 are allowed. I wonder if that is like the Shark Bites or similar? I need to look into that.

But I am thinking the black or galv steel will be the easiest and cheapest route as well as being the "gold standard". I still need to research the black vs. galvanized thing some more.

I appreciate your input on how the black seems to hold up outdoors.

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You cant run galvanized pipe like you mentioned. Just run Black iron. I know your worried about it rusting but there are miles of black pipe run on top of commercial buildings all over with no issues.
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Old 09-01-2012, 09:23 AM   #27
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I appreciate your input on how the black seems to hold up outdoors.
Just go look at your gas meter. It most likely will be a gray service riser up to a valve, then a regulator. The rest should be black iron. It may be painted, but it should be black iron.
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Old 09-01-2012, 09:59 AM   #28
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D'oooohhh! Why didn't I think of that?

The riser is unpainted and rusty. It goes to the 2 psig regulator then steel pipe to the meter and out of the meter, all painted "meter gray" and looks pretty good. I suppose it is black steel under the paint. This connects with a flare nut directly to the soft copper line that goes to supply the manifold in the utility room.

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Just go look at your gas meter. It most likely will be a gray service riser up to a valve, then a regulator. The rest should be black iron. It may be painted, but it should be black iron.
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Old 09-01-2012, 11:06 AM   #29
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This place I found has good prices on NG/LP hoses and free shipping:

http://www.equipsupply.com/families/...e-Hoses?page=1
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Old 09-01-2012, 08:25 PM   #30
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I went back and did all the grill/generator piping over using black steel. I wouldn't have gotten to it this soon except when I was in Lowes this morning the kid told me they custom cut and thread the pipe right there in the store. Sweet! So off I went to measure... I only needed 3 custom pieces and some assorted nipples, elbows and tees. It came out really nice. Seems like overkill outdoors but I am more conscious of meeting the code now than in my younger days. I'll post up some pics when I get a chance.

As an FYI... my 15 year old copper rig looked fine inside. No crud, no noticeable corrosion. It didn't have a drip leg and I never had a problem with the grill. The gas here must be pretty clean and free of H2S. Oh well, off to the recycle yard for that stuff.

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