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Old 08-31-2012, 10:50 AM   #1
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Finished generator project


Here is my setup with a Yamaha 4500 generator with US Carburetion tri-fuel conversion hooked up to natural gas and plugged into a Reliance 10 circuit manual transfer panel.

The 4500 watt output is plenty for my needs. I had to turn a bunch of stuff on including the microwave and a/c blower to get near max load. I may pick up a small room a/c next spring for my bedroom and keep it around for outages as this generator will supposedly start and run up to a 13000 BTU unit (without a lot of other stuff at the same time).

Nice and quiet, too. Best of all no trips to the gas station! Let PEPCO do its worst!



Generator hooked up to NG line with quick disconnect


Power inlet box


Main electric panel and Reliance transfer switch panel indoors

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Old 08-31-2012, 01:40 PM   #2
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Looks nice.

We can't run gas in copper like that here.

US Carburetion sells hoses to go make the connection in various lengths. I have one about 6 years old which is in good shape (kept out of the sun). I would think that the metal line is going to work harden and fail on you after a few "moves."

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Old 08-31-2012, 01:45 PM   #3
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We can't run gas in copper like that here.
And there is a reason. Copper can easily corrode when (I say when because it will) come into contact with a dissimilar metal. Then you have a leak.

Should have used black iron. Also not sure that flex is rated for outdoor and/or non-protected use.
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Old 08-31-2012, 01:50 PM   #4
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There also should have been a tee with a caped off nipple on the end of the line for trash in the line to fall into.
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Old 08-31-2012, 01:53 PM   #5
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I dont like the copper either, and have NEVER seen it run like that...
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Old 08-31-2012, 02:15 PM   #6
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The copper is probably not to code, and it really should have a drip leg since this setup pushes all water and debris straight into your regulator. That yellow flex is not intended for movable applications, just for stationary appliances. It will fail from repeated flexing. You need flexible rubber hose rather than corrugated tube.
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Old 08-31-2012, 02:17 PM   #7
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The copper is probably not to code, and it really should have a drip leg since this setup pushes all water and debris straight into your regulator. That yellow flex is not intended for movable applications, just for stationary appliances. It will fail from repeated flexing. You need flexible rubber hose rather than corrugated tube.
And something to secure the generator from moving when hooked up.
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Old 08-31-2012, 02:24 PM   #8
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Gas here is run with soft copper tubing indoors. Only black iron is in the gas manifold and the terminations and drip legs to the furnace and water heater. Is the hard copper more susceptible to corrosion? Seems like iron pipe outside would just be a rust fest.

My BBQ grills have been running on the same stuff for 15 years w/o issue and no leaks... I just replaced the main straight run of pipe to the grill (and now generator) with the new larger diameter pipe. The old piece was not corroded internally that I could see. There are no dissimilar metals anywhere except for the brass quick connects.

BTW, this gas line does not tap into any original interior or exterior gas lines. It merely comes off an existing stub/gas ball valve that sticks out of the rear siding as installed by the builder.

Good idea on the drip leg. I'll go back and add that sometime. I can't see that the gas range corrugated tube would be much of a problem for very occassional outdoor use. But I might replace it with the one US Carb offers sometime.

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I dont like the copper either, and have NEVER seen it run like that...
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Old 08-31-2012, 02:26 PM   #9
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It actually has a locking wheel brake.

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And something to secure the generator from moving when hooked up.
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Old 08-31-2012, 02:26 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by raylo32 View Post
Gas here is run with soft copper tubing indoors. Only black iron is in the gas manifold and the terminations and drip legs to the furnace and water heater. Is the hard copper more susceptible to corrosion? Seems like iron pipe outside would just be a rust fest.

My BBQ grills have been running on the same stuff for 15 years w/o issue and no leaks... I just replaced the main straight run of pipe to the grill (and now generator) with the new larger diameter pipe. The old piece was not corroded internally that I could see. There are no dissimilar metals anywhere except for the brass quick connects.

BTW, this gas line does not tap into any original interior or exterior gas lines. It merely comes off an existing stub/gas ball valve that sticks out of the rear siding as installed by the builder.

Good idea on the drip leg. I'll go back and add that sometime. I can't see that the gas range corrugated tube would be much of a problem for very occassional outdoor use. But I might replace it with the one US Carb offers sometime.
I dont know gas codes... so my opinion is pretty worthless.
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Old 08-31-2012, 02:32 PM   #11
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I dont know gas codes... so my opinion is pretty worthless.
Copper may be used for gas applications, it just can't have sweated joints and fittings.
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Old 08-31-2012, 02:40 PM   #12
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Even outside? Is the reason for this that the continuous soft tube eliminates the chance for a micro leak at joints? Or is there a specific problem with solder/gas chemistry and interaction? Just thinking that a micro leak outside would not be anywhere near the issue it would be indoors. Not that I have any since all the joints were leak checked. I'd hate to go back and redo with the continous tubing. Interesting that the gas company comes by monthly to read the meter that about 10 feet away from where the pipe is and has not raised an issue with my grill line for 15 years. Damn... I'd hate to have to go back and redo it all with soft tubing.

And just a P.S. edit. I would never under any circumstances run hard copper/sweated gas piping like this indoors.

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Copper may be used for gas applications, it just can't have sweated joints and fittings.
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Old 08-31-2012, 02:46 PM   #13
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Cute, but I like my Honda 5500 and 2500.Depending on the weather.
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Old 08-31-2012, 03:04 PM   #14
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It actually has a locking wheel brake.
Any gas grill i've seen has a tether shorter than the flexible gas hookup.
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Old 08-31-2012, 03:23 PM   #15
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Gas here is run with soft copper tubing indoors.
What type of gas? LP or natural? LP industry still uses copper tubing. Natural gas industry doesn't. The reason is corrosion. Propane is a byproduct of natural gas. It is stripped of all gases and hydrocarbons but propane. Natural gas is nothing but a mix of hydrocarbons comprised mainly of methane. But one of the other components of natural gas is hydrogen sulphide which is corrosive to copper. So unless you are using LP or "town" gas, there is going to be hydrogen sulphide in your gas.

Paint the black iron.

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