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Old 09-04-2009, 08:48 PM   #1
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Exterior Lighting Junction Box


I'm planning on installilng some coach lights on my garage. My plan is to use a 4" square box with a RACO 756 mud ring (4" Square Box Fixture Cover, Raised 5/8", Ears 2-3/4" O.C.)

Is a 2-3/4" screw mount spacing what most fixtures use? I could also use a 4" pancake box which has the ears at 3-1/2" OC. How does one know which one to use? Do you just have to pick the fixture first?

I think using a box with a round fixture cover will be the easiest to install since I can just use a hole saw to cut a hole in the siding. Instead of having to trace an octagonal box and cut it with a jigsaw or something.

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Old 09-04-2009, 10:29 PM   #2
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Exterior Lighting Junction Box


Most fixtures have a crossbar that can attach to either the 4" octagon box, or the mud ring which emulates a 3" octagon box. Both attach with 8-32 machine screws.

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Old 09-05-2009, 08:58 AM   #3
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4" square w/mud ring or pancake should work, but might consider using a round 'old-work' cut-in box.
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Old 09-05-2009, 10:13 AM   #4
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No need to cut holes with this style mounting block.

http://www.arlcatalog.com/Siding/Sid...Box%20Kits.htm
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Old 09-05-2009, 05:39 PM   #5
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Jim, the siding is T1-11. That mount looks like it works best with lap siding.

Last edited by romexican; 09-05-2009 at 05:41 PM.
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Old 09-05-2009, 07:13 PM   #6
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You could still use that style block. You would just break off the flange outside of the box.
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Old 09-06-2009, 11:46 AM   #7
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I would just use ceiling mud rings (round) instead of receptacle mud rings, then any fixture will work. You are going to recess the boxes and rings right? Dry location?
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Old 09-06-2009, 08:07 PM   #8
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Okay sliding is T1-11, RIGHT.

Buy a 4" ocatagon box x 2-1/8 deep, get it with the romex clamps.

Next take 3/8 drill with a bit big enough so that a 1-1/2" galv. sheet rock
screw will pass thru.

Next take the drill and place the octagon box on it side.

Drill hole thru side of metal oct. at an angle, close to box edge.

Repeat this proces three more times, for the three other sides.

Yes, I know an octagon box has a total of eight sides.

But you just need four sides, I use the side that is the widest.

This way, the exterior light fixture, will always cover the box.
And you can you a hole saw to make the open for the fixture box.

Happy drilling.

Last edited by Ranger31; 09-06-2009 at 08:11 PM.
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Old 09-07-2009, 11:22 AM   #9
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Exterior Lighting Junction Box


Quote:
Originally Posted by Ranger31 View Post
Okay sliding is T1-11, RIGHT.

Buy a 4" ocatagon box x 2-1/8 deep, get it with the romex clamps.

Next take 3/8 drill with a bit big enough so that a 1-1/2" galv. sheet rock
screw will pass thru.

Next take the drill and place the octagon box on it side.

Drill hole thru side of metal oct. at an angle, close to box edge.

Repeat this proces three more times, for the three other sides.

Yes, I know an octagon box has a total of eight sides.

But you just need four sides, I use the side that is the widest.

This way, the exterior light fixture, will always cover the box.
And you can you a hole saw to make the open for the fixture box.

Happy drilling.
You know better than to drill holes, or alter a j-box, by drilling holes in it.
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Old 09-07-2009, 01:13 PM   #10
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Exterior Lighting Junction Box


Might have leared from 220/221
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Old 09-08-2009, 11:58 AM   #11
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Exterior Lighting Junction Box


Maybe. Even in plastic boxes.
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Old 09-08-2009, 05:16 PM   #12
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Exterior Lighting Junction Box


J.V., before you make blanket statement, you need to show proof
that what I suggested, is a violation the metal J. Box UL. listing.

So start a new thread on this topic.






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Old 09-08-2009, 05:28 PM   #13
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Exterior Lighting Junction Box


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romexican
Best. username. ever.


Quote:
How does one know which one to use?
This is an issue which bugs the hell out of me. Most things are standard in the electrical manufacturing industry but for some reason we ended up with 3/0 and 4/0 boxes. Pisses me off

If all fixtures had cross bar style mouting hardwars, it wouldn't be an issue. I have spent 30 minutes futsing with a fixture that should have taken 3 minutes to mount, just because the mounting method doesn't line up with the box type/holes.

Having the fixture before you install the box is a HUGE help.

Last edited by 220/221; 09-08-2009 at 05:32 PM.
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Old 09-09-2009, 12:42 PM   #14
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Exterior Lighting Junction Box


Quote:
Originally Posted by Ranger31 View Post
J.V., before you make blanket statement, you need to show proof
that what I suggested, is a violation the metal J. Box UL. listing.

So start a new thread on this topic.






"On the internet, anyone can say anything on any subject even if
what they say it not true, some people will believe then."
Ranger,
Don't get your panties in a wad. Did you not see the laughing face? I know metal boxes are drilled every day in this trade. I have never ever though twice about drilling holes in metal boxes for mounting and for punching. Now, plastic is another story. Calm down friend.


Last edited by J. V.; 09-09-2009 at 12:44 PM.
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