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Old 07-01-2013, 06:24 PM   #1
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Exposed 10/3 wire in basement - add conduit?


I am running a new circuit for my clothes dryer. The dryer was previously in a very difficult location, requiring awkward runs of exhaust pipe through the ceiling. I am moving the dryer to the location directly below the exhaust vent, so I can just do a straight single vertical run of dryer vent pipe.

The dryer was previously hardwired directly into a circuit breaker sub panel feeding from the main breaker box. A run of 10/3 NM already exists and feeds into this breaker box. For some reason, the dryer was previously hardwired directly into this breaker box as well. I've already rewired the dryer with a cord with a plug.

The wall the dryer will sit against is poured concrete and uneven, so I was planning to mount a board on the wall to provide a stable mounting surface for a 220v socket.

Since this is all in the basement though, I'd feel a lot better having the final run of this 10/3 cable be inside EMT conduit. I already have a plan for what to do, but I need to know if this would be allowed by code.

What I want to do is remove the subpanel breaker box (since it's not needed, there's already a breaker back at the main panel), and then mount a metal ceiling box at this old location and run the 10/3 into it securing with a standard cable clamp. Then I want to use this ceiling box as a junction to transition into the EMT conduit, which will bring the new 10/3 cable from this junction to the new location on the wallboard.

This would be a lot more clean than stapling more 10/3 cable across the joists and down the board, but I also don't want to have to pull out all the old 10/3 and run EMT conduit all the way back to the main breaker box. Not to mention, it's already pretty crowded over there and I might have to replan some other wire runs to actually get a 10/3 wire inside conduit to situate itself nicely at the main breaker.

So... Can I do what I want to do (use a metal junction box to transition from bare NM to conduit) legally by code?

I live in southern MN in the US.

Thanks,

F

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Old 07-01-2013, 08:20 PM   #2
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Exposed 10/3 wire in basement - add conduit?


Yes, you can changeover from NM to EMT in a junction box. This box will have to remain accessible. It will need to be atleast 17.5 cu in assuming no internal clamps are included.

If you plan on running 10/3 NM Cable in conduit, the conduit would be required to be 3/4", if you wanted to use Individual #10 THHN wires in the conduit, you could use 1/2".

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Old 07-01-2013, 08:50 PM   #3
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Exposed 10/3 wire in basement - add conduit?


Thank you!

I was planning on running 10/3 NM inside 3/4" conduit since the knockout on my surface mount outlet is sized for 3/4" to begin with. I will use a plain box with knockouts and connect the grounds together as well as to the box. The basement is unfinished so I'll just secure the box to a joist and it will be accessible.

Thanks again!

F
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Old 07-01-2013, 09:17 PM   #4
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Exposed 10/3 wire in basement - add conduit?


If you are running the NM in the EMT, you do not need a box at the transition. You are using the EMT as a sleeve not as a raceway.
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Old 07-01-2013, 10:38 PM   #5
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Exposed 10/3 wire in basement - add conduit?


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Originally Posted by rjniles View Post
If you are running the NM in the EMT, you do not need a box at the transition. You are using the EMT as a sleeve not as a raceway.
I read it as he has exsisting 10/3 and needs a jbox
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Old 07-01-2013, 11:47 PM   #6
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Exposed 10/3 wire in basement - add conduit?


Yes, I have a run of 10/3 WITHOUT conduit coming into the room up to a breaker subpanel that I'll be removing since there is already a breaker at the main panel. Thinking back, I think the reason for this extra breaker panel is that in the past the run was hooked to the "range" portion of my old cartridge fuse load center (I do not have an electric range). This just gave extra protection. Now with basically the same breaker back at the main panel, no need for a second breaker at the dryer itself especially now that I'm switching to a 220v plug rather than a hardwired dryer.

I don't want to mess with the existing 10/3 because there's really no reason to. I just want to transition INTO conduit in the utility room for the run across the ceiling and down to the dryer's new location.

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Old 07-02-2013, 02:58 AM   #7
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Exposed 10/3 wire in basement - add conduit?


Could he also use 10/3 MC from jbox to Dryer receptacle so as to not having to deal with EMT?
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Old 07-02-2013, 11:04 AM   #8
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Exposed 10/3 wire in basement - add conduit?


Quote:
Originally Posted by fdmillion View Post
Yes, I have a run of 10/3 WITHOUT conduit coming into the room up to a breaker subpanel that I'll be removing since there is already a breaker at the main panel. Thinking back, I think the reason for this extra breaker panel is that in the past the run was hooked to the "range" portion of my old cartridge fuse load center (I do not have an electric range). This just gave extra protection. Now with basically the same breaker back at the main panel, no need for a second breaker at the dryer itself especially now that I'm switching to a 220v plug rather than a hardwired dryer.

I don't want to mess with the existing 10/3 because there's really no reason to. I just want to transition INTO conduit in the utility room for the run across the ceiling and down to the dryer's new location.

F
This box you call a "breaker subpanel" is most likely the means of service disconnect for your hardwired dryer, and would have been located within sight of the appliance. Some service disconnects may use switches that look like a normal circuit breaker, but may or may not provide overcurrent protection.

If you are relocating and converting your dryer to plug-in cord/receptacle, that will now be your means of service disconnect. Your new circuit may need to conform with current code and be wired such that neutral and ground is not bonded at the dryer.
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Old 07-02-2013, 02:45 PM   #9
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Exposed 10/3 wire in basement - add conduit?


The OP has changed the dryer to cord and plug connection. It does not require a disconnect.

If the cable is long enough I too would just sleeve it down to the receptacle.
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Old 07-02-2013, 04:20 PM   #10
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Exposed 10/3 wire in basement - add conduit?


The neutral and ground were NOT bonded at the old subpanel.

A simple 2-position 30 amp loadcenter was mounted behind the dryer in its old location. Inside, the 10/3 comes in, the neutral was tied to the neutral bus bar, the ground was tied to a separate ground bar, and the two hots went into the terminals that connect to the breaker. Coming out, the dryer's cable itself was hardwired, with its two hots connected directly to the breaker, its neutral to the bus bar, and its ground to the ground bar. As others said, I agree that this was being used as a disconnect since (for whatever reason) the dryer was hardwired directly into the breaker panel.

I simply re-corded the dryer to use a plug, and since this subpanel does not appear to be anything other than a secondary disconnect, I eliminated it, since unplugging the dryer is now the means of disconnect. ;-)

Thanks again for all the tips!

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