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Old 11-15-2008, 07:02 PM   #1
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EMT - Tools & Tips


I have managed to make some pretty decent looking bends in conduit. I have a bit of trouble figuring out how to get that nice little offset, like what is used for a outlet box on a concrete wall. Any tips or suggests on making that bend? Other suggesting on bending EMT are welcome.

I have been using screw set connections. Have these mainly replaced the old indenter fittings? If not, do you know who makes the indentor tools? I have been looking around, but have not found the tool or the fittings.

Jamie

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Old 11-15-2008, 07:20 PM   #2
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Originally Posted by jamiedolan View Post
I have managed to make some pretty decent looking bends in conduit. I have a bit of trouble figuring out how to get that nice little offset, like what is used for a outlet box on a concrete wall. Any tips or suggests on making that bend? Other suggesting on bending EMT are welcome.

I have been using screw set connections. Have these mainly replaced the old indenter fittings? If not, do you know who makes the indentor tools? I have been looking around, but have not found the tool or the fittings.

Jamie
Not sure what you mean by "indenter" fittings. But a box offset is not something that can be measured. There is no formula for it. It is just a practice thing. I usually put the pipe in the bender with about 1/2" sticking past. Bend to less than 10 degrees, turn it over, slide it forward a bit, and bend again. Like I said, it just takes practice.

Take a couple sticks and cut them into 3 ft. sections. Then bend until you get it.

Greenlee also make a tool for bending box offsets, but unless you are bending alot, it isn't worth it.

EDIT: oh! Indenter... duh...


Last edited by InPhase277; 11-15-2008 at 08:28 PM.
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Old 11-15-2008, 07:21 PM   #3
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I haven't seen the indenter fittings in many years. They were popular years ago, and occasionally I'll see them in a remodel.

As stated above, bending box offsets just takes practice.

Rob
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Old 11-15-2008, 10:04 PM   #4
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I haven't seen the indenter fittings in many years. They were popular years ago, and occasionally I'll see them in a remodel.

As stated above, bending box offsets just takes practice.

Rob
2 other quick conduit questions. Is there a tool that helps put the nut onto the ends? I have a couple things I use like a screw driver and a hammer, but wondering if there is a better way.

I have been looking for a sleeve that goes inside the conduit at the end, like a bushing inside the condiut at the end. My old EMT in my home has this. The big box stores don't seem to have this, only external plastic bushings. Does anyone make and use the inside bushings / sleeves anymore? I clean / ream out my pipes really well, but it still isn't perfect and I can understand why they used a sleeve on my old stuff.

Jamie
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Old 11-15-2008, 10:20 PM   #5
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2 other quick conduit questions. Is there a tool that helps put the nut onto the ends? I have a couple things I use like a screw driver and a hammer, but wondering if there is a better way.
Klein makes locknut pliers, cat. # D333-8. But for occasional use, a screwdriver and linemans pliers is all most folks need.

Quote:
I have been looking for a sleeve that goes inside the conduit at the end, like a bushing inside the condiut at the end. My old EMT in my home has this. The big box stores don't seem to have this, only external plastic bushings. Does anyone make and use the inside bushings / sleeves anymore? I clean / ream out my pipes really well, but it still isn't perfect and I can understand why they used a sleeve on my old stuff.

Jamie
If you cut the pipe square, and ream, the insulated throat of the connector is all that is needed. I do not know where to find an insulated insert.
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Old 11-15-2008, 11:02 PM   #6
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Klein makes locknut pliers, cat. # D333-8. But for occasional use, a screwdriver and linemans pliers is all most folks need.

If you cut the pipe square, and ream, the insulated throat of the connector is all that is needed. I do not know where to find an insulated insert.
I use a pipe cutting took, so it is square. I ream with the cutter tool, but then also use a file.

I just searched and found the Klien for about $28, not too bad. I just searched for lock nut pliers and found a Channellock brand lock nut pliers for $16.95 at lowes. I like those nuts to be on there really nice and tight.

Thanks
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Old 11-16-2008, 11:56 AM   #7
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I have the klien pair and do not like them. I have seen the channellock brand at lowes and think it would work better.
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Old 11-16-2008, 12:06 PM   #8
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I have the klien pair and do not like them. I have seen the channellock brand at lowes and think it would work better.
Thanks very much for the tip. I was ready to go get the Klein one in a little bit. I saw the channel lock one on lowes web site and thought about it, but was going to opt for the Klien brand.

I will head to lowes and pick up one of the Channel Lock ones.

I have a couple of the lock nuts I can't get as tight as I want, and some old ones that are really hard to get off.

Thanks
Jamie
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Old 04-29-2011, 03:39 AM   #9
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EMT electrical conduit is the most popular of its kind used because it is inexpensive compared to the others and it is much more light weight. If you are a beginner working with EMT electrical conduit, here are a few tips to help guide you along the way to help make the process go smoothly.
Many people forget to turn off the power supply when they are beginning a job with electricity. Make sure that before you do anything you shut off any power that is going to that area as well as any water source to avoid any problems or damage.
The easiest way to go about cutting the tubing for your electrical conduit is to use a vise and a hacksaw. You will want to find a hacksaw that has at least 18 teeth if not more to be the most efficient. Using the vise to hold it you can cut easily.
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Old 04-29-2011, 05:58 PM   #10
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as for the channel lock brand lock nut pliers, I have them and like them but i always thought i would like kliens better.
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Old 04-29-2011, 07:31 PM   #11
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The electricians which worked for my company used a device the called a "kicker". I do not know it's official name, but any electrical supply house should be able to get you one. They used it for surface mounted boxes and when a pipe had to go around a pipe.
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Old 04-30-2011, 07:52 AM   #12
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You mean this ?

These are sweet if you are doing alot of box offsets. Unfortunately the price is pretty sweet too...nearly $300.
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Old 04-30-2011, 09:53 AM   #13
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Yep, that's it. I imagine if you do enough industrial surface mount it could pay for itself.....eventually.
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Old 04-30-2011, 10:09 AM   #14
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You mean this ?

These are sweet if you are doing alot of box offsets. Unfortunately the price is pretty sweet too...nearly $300.
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Yep, that's it. I imagine if you do enough industrial surface mount it could pay for itself.....eventually.
Yep I have them in two size verison one at half inch and other one is at 3/4 inch verison and they are not cheap but it worth it if you doing do alot of it in commercal building or industrail locations,

However some Metros area they will required conduit in the resdentail area which I know Chicago for a fact they do require that and couple other cities as well depending on the building classifaction is.

Merci,
Marc
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Old 04-30-2011, 10:17 AM   #15
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I agree Marc. If I could get them both for $300, I would. Still looking for that deal though...

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