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Old 07-05-2012, 10:34 AM   #16
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Electrified Pool


I don't know if anyone makes a Stay Out of the Pool alarm, but here are the basics, at least in principle. If I had a pool I probably would have done this.

-Put 3 stainless steel spikes in the ground in an equilateral triangle pattern with the pool in the middle and measure the voltage between each spike.

-Measure your pool voltages.

-Divide the max spike voltage, e.g., 3v, by the max pool voltage, e.g., 1.5v, to get the ratio (in this case, 2).

Mike Holt says over two pool volts is a problem so in this case a spike voltage of over 4v may mean "stay out of the pool".

For $20 in parts an audible alarm could be hooked up to monitor these voltages. It'd be several comparators with their outputs in a wired-or configuration.
If your pool is not yet built you could run insulated wires in the pool concrete to monitor critical points directly without using ground spikes.
You are looking for voltage differences between places that people may touch.


Last edited by Yoyizit; 07-05-2012 at 10:52 AM.
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Old 07-05-2012, 05:01 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yoyizit View Post
You are looking for voltage differences between places that people may touch.
A properly designed and installed bonding sytem will put all of these voltage gradients into the same potential and eliminate the shock potential.
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Old 07-05-2012, 05:47 PM   #18
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A properly designed and installed bonding sytem will put all of these voltage gradients into the same potential and eliminate the shock potential.
In principle, yes.

I wonder how many old and new pools show over 2v during a power-line-down condition, for whatever reason. This is not easily tested.
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Old 07-05-2012, 07:09 PM   #19
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Originally Posted by Yoyizit View Post
In principle, yes.

I wonder how many old and new pools show over 2v during a power-line-down condition, for whatever reason. This is not easily tested.
None if they have a EBG, as for older pools, impossible to calculate real statistics.

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