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Old 10-21-2011, 01:59 AM   #16
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Electrician best practice questions


I would use 2 separate holes everytime

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Old 10-21-2011, 07:31 AM   #17
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The best thing to do is sometimes hire the right person for the job
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Old 10-21-2011, 10:53 AM   #18
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The best thing to do is sometimes hire the right person for the job


It sounds like he is doing a decent job with his wiring. No need to hire it out if he isn't hacking it up


One other big thing with home owners is the inside of a box. What i do is leave the romex long at first. Strip the wire back to about 1/2 inch from where it enters the box. Many home owners will only strip what they need and it looks like hell. You want to leave just enough sheath on the cable that if the cable moved the individual wires won't become exposed outside the box, I believe code says 1/4 inch minimum. I leave about a half inch. Then pair up the wires that you are going to wire nut together. Push them around so they are paired neatly together. One wire might be heading straight out the box and the other wire might have to travel across the back of the box to the other wires. After you have them paired neatly. Cut them off at roughly 8 inches. Next I strip the wires a little long. About an inch. Twist them up with hour linemen pliers so that the stripped portion is twisted up tight (don't twist up the rest of wire, just where its stripped) after your wires are twisted, cut the exposed copper off to about a half inch. Then tighten your wirenuts


Ah, this is turning in to a novel. I'll have to take some pictures. My original point was, just make it neat and tidy inside your boxes as well.
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Old 10-22-2011, 10:20 AM   #19
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Thanks Jimmy! I'll do my best to do a tidy job inside and outside the boxes. Actually, hubby said to me the wiring I did last weekend is now the neatest section in the whole house (and we know that most of the existing wiring was done by electricians). That made me feel pretty good about taking on the project. Plus, I'm getting a lot of help from online community as well as county inspectors.
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Old 11-11-2011, 04:18 PM   #20
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I have another question that needs immediate answer since I'm pulling the cables right now.

I have no trouble fitting >2 cables through one 3/4" hole that I drilled through the sole plate and subfloor. However, it somehow dawned on me that I don't remember seeing anywhere with >2 cables through one hole in the existing wiring. I remember hearing somewhere you cannot staple more than 2 cables at each staple, and wonder if similar rule applies to feeding cables through holes. So, is it okay I feed more than two cables through one bore hole in the studs or top/sole plates?

Hope to hear back soon. Thank you.
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Old 11-11-2011, 04:32 PM   #21
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I try to stay at 3 or less, so you are ok.
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Old 11-11-2011, 04:33 PM   #22
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Should've asked Mr. Google before I posted in a haste. I think I found the answer, at least for my situation where the cables I deal with are 12/2, 14/2, or 14/3's and I won't have more than 3 cables through one hole. So, I should be fine.

For others' benefit, following are a couple of links Mr. Google gave me:
http://ths.gardenweb.com/forums/load...4216270.html?9
http://ths.gardenweb.com/forums/load...123523574.html

Edit: oh, jbfan, thanks for the speedy reply!!!
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Old 11-11-2011, 04:48 PM   #23
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I try to stay at 2 cables per hole. Not to say I wouldn't put another one through the same hole if I had to. Usually its pretty easy to pop a new hole
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Old 11-11-2011, 10:30 PM   #24
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Great! Now that we've gotten the holes behind us, I have two other best-practice questions to ask.

1) What kind of screws do you use to secure this kind of adjustable boxes to studs?





I was thinking about using regular drywall screws (easy to break in), but I also have these screws I could use. Any requirements here I need to be aware of?









2) In, the above box, I've spliced all the wires and left the pigtails out ready for a receptacle. What's the best way to label here? Does my box look inspection ready?
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Old 11-11-2011, 11:54 PM   #25
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Great! Now that we've gotten the holes behind us, I have two other best-practice questions to ask.

1) What kind of screws do you use to secure this kind of adjustable boxes to studs?


I was thinking about using regular drywall screws (easy to break in), but I also have these screws I could use. Any requirements here I need to be aware of?

Use those pan head screws, drywall screws break off too easy. Drywall screws are for mounting drywall, not doing electrical work. Not to say i havnt used them on occasion, but i try not to. Those pan head screws are actually the exact ones i prefer

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2) In, the above box, I've spliced all the wires and left the pigtails out ready for a receptacle. What's the best way to label here? Does my box look inspection ready?
I don't label anything in a house. I just pigtail the wires out so they are ready for devices to be hooked up. If i come to a box mounted a foot off the floor and it has a white, a black, and a bare copper. Throw a receptacle in and its done. I wouldn't look at a label if there was one. Same thing in switch boxes. Come to a box and there is a red and a white wire with a black wrapped around it, i know its a 3 way. No reason to have a label

In the electrical panel on the other hand, i label everything. I also label things if its not going to be straight forward in the future.
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Old 11-12-2011, 08:55 AM   #26
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I agree with Jimmy. Pan heads are the first choice, but drywall screws work too. Being the pine stud is usually soft enough, drywall screws do ok, but you do have to be more attentive to avoid breaking them.

Generally I don’t label things in the outlet boxes either unless it’s something out of the ordinary. 3-ways get the common wrapped around the travelers, 4-ways…wrap each pair of travelers around themselves, then wrap the sets around each other. Something not mentioned...boxes that get a GFCI receptacle I strip the black & white of the line side, then you’ll know later which cable is line side.
At the panel, all cables get identified. I write the name of the circuit on the sheath with a sharpie. Later, I cut that section and make a sleeve out of it, and slip it over the ‘hot’ wire before landing it on the breaker. When the panel is done, just match up the panel directory to the breakers and label the directory.
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Old 11-12-2011, 10:27 AM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jdwired View Post
The best thing to do is sometimes hire the right person for the job
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Originally Posted by jimmy21 View Post
It sounds like he is doing a decent job with his wiring. No need to hire it out if he isn't hacking it up
I agree.....been following this thread....at one point in my life I had the same questions.

I've also realized that sometimes the quality of work done by the "right person" is not up to my standards. It may be correct.....but not always as neat as it could be.

With that said....I personally enjoy doing the wiring and plumbing in my house (moving my sewer line over 1.5' is the exception). And because I did it....I know where everything is.

Regarding wire markers.....I have a Panduit labeler....I make labels with the CB # on it...so when I open up a box, I know what breaker that wire comes from. I also mark the Neutral so that I know which one it is in the load center.

I also tend to use a lot of CB's....good way to isolate smaller sections of the house. And I never put wall sockets and lights on the same breaker....I don't like being left in the dark.

I don't have some of the problems your having....I tend to use a lot of THHN stranded wire in conduit. Easier to pull and I can add ckts later....well, actually....I usually pull a couple of spares so it's not an issue.
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Old 11-12-2011, 10:39 AM   #28
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I also mark the Neutral so that I know which one it is in the load center.
Excellent advice. No one does it, but it sure does make sense. Most people assume all the neutrals are the same and it does not matter which white you use. Thanks for bringing that up. You might have just taught a lot of people something they did not know.
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Old 11-12-2011, 12:22 PM   #29
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Sound advice. Thank you. I am not satisfied with how the existing wiring was laid out and run (done by electricians) in this old house, I'm particular about how things should look in the end, and I don't feel comfortable telling others (incl. my own husband) what to do, so I took on this whole house wiring project on my own... just like all the other things in my life (wonder why I'm always so busy).

The house had 7 circuits in total, and now it'll have 22 once all are hooked up. Talk about a CB for everything . I pulled all the circuits to the panel and hired an electrician to do the panel upgrade. He's not all done yet -- he did hook up the complete circuits (vs. the open circuits that will require rough in inspection), and will still need to come back and install a second 12"x12" junction box behind the panel for cable clamping.

Since I marked every Romex cable end, so all he needed to do was to cut the sleeve off and slide it down the hot, but he didn't do that for all the circuits that were hooked up. No big deal. I knew I wanted to have the breakers arranged a certain way and I would like to mark all the neutrals too. So, instead of demanding him to do what I wanted, I think I'll just let him do his job. After that, I'll redo everything at the panel -- move, label, and dress the wires however I want .
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Old 11-12-2011, 12:36 PM   #30
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Okay, enough of a control freak's confession, one more question. At my sewing center, I was going to use IKEA LED strip for under cabinet lighting. My question is can I cut off the wall plug, separate hot and neutral wires and connect them at a regular wall switch? (Can I have the transformer inside the cabinet?) I believe it can be done technically, but I wonder if that's to NEC standard. If not, what's the right way to hardwire the LED strip?



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